Who Are the Dividend Aristocrats in 2021?
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Who are the Dividend Aristocrats in 2021?

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The Dividend Aristocrats in 2021

Legendary investor George Soros once said, “Good investing should be boring”. But an increase in volatile themes today suggests this maxim has gone ignored by at least some market participants.

From a high level, we can view investments on a spectrum. Volatile assets like cryptocurrencies and SPACs are more on the exciting side of things. The boring side is likely where Dividend Aristocrat stocks lie.

The data above, from Sure Dividend, looks at all 65 Dividend Aristocrats, ranking them by their yield, sector, and years of growth.

What are Dividend Aristocrats?

The U.S. Dividend Aristocrats are a basket of 65 stocks in the S&P 500 index. These companies have been growing their dividend per share consecutively, for a minimum of 25 years.

This is easier said than done, since companies often distribute dividends quarterly. To pay and grow a dividend in the long run implies a business model that can withstand varying economic environments, including setbacks like market crashes.

Though dividend stocks may not carry the same excitement as other investments, studies show that dividends represent over 50% of total S&P 500 market returns.

CompanyDividend YieldYears Dividend GrownSector
AT&T, Inc.6.9%36Communication Services
Exxon Mobil Corp.6.1%38Energy
Chevron Corp.5.1%33Energy
International Business Machines Corp.4.9%25Technology
Abbvie Inc4.8%49Healthcare
Realty Income Corp.4.2%26Real Estate
People`s United Financial Inc4.1%28Financial Services
Federal Realty Investment Trust4.0%53Real Estate
Consolidated Edison, Inc.4.0%47Utilities
Amcor Plc3.9%36Consumer Cyclical
Franklin Resources, Inc.3.7%41Financial Services
Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc3.5%45Healthcare
Leggett & Platt, Inc.3.3%47Consumer Cyclical
Kimberly-Clark Corp.3.3%49Consumer Defensive
Cardinal Health, Inc.3.2%33Healthcare
Coca-Cola Co3.1%58Consumer Defensive
PepsiCo Inc3.0%49Consumer Defensive
3M Co.3.0%62Industrials
Essex Property Trust, Inc.2.9%26Real Estate
Genuine Parts Co.2.7%65Consumer Cyclical
General Dynamics Corp.2.6%28Industrials
Procter & Gamble Co.2.5%64Consumer Defensive
Johnson & Johnson2.5%58Healthcare
Archer Daniels Midland Co.2.5%46Consumer Defensive
Aflac Inc.2.5%39Financial Services
Atmos Energy Corp.2.5%37Utilities
Cincinnati Financial Corp.2.4%60Financial Services
Clorox Co.2.3%43Consumer Defensive
VF Corp.2.3%48Consumer Cyclical
Sysco Corp.2.2%51Consumer Defensive
Colgate-Palmolive Co.2.2%57Consumer Defensive
McDonald`s Corp2.2%45Consumer Cyclical
Emerson Electric Co.2.2%64Industrials
Hormel Foods Corp.2.1%55Consumer Defensive
Air Products & Chemicals Inc.2.1%39Basic Materials
Nucor Corp.2.0%47Basic Materials
Illinois Tool Works, Inc.2.0%46Industrials
T. Rowe Price Group Inc.2.0%34Financial Services
Chubb Limited2.0%27Financial Services
Automatic Data Processing Inc.1.9%46Industrials
NextEra Energy Inc1.9%25Utilities
Medtronic Plc1.8%43Healthcare
Caterpillar Inc.1.8%26Industrials
Walmart Inc1.6%48Consumer Defensive
McCormick & Co., Inc.1.5%34Consumer Defensive
A.O. Smith Corp.1.5%27Industrials
W.W. Grainger Inc.1.5%49Industrials
Linde Plc1.5%28Basic Materials
Abbott Laboratories1.4%49Healthcare
Dover Corp.1.4%65Industrials
Stanley Black & Decker Inc1.4%53Industrials
Target Corp1.3%53Consumer Defensive
PPG Industries, Inc.1.3%49Basic Materials
Becton, Dickinson And Co.1.3%49Healthcare
Pentair plc1.3%44Industrials
Lowe`s Cos., Inc.1.2%57Consumer Cyclical
Albemarle Corp.1.0%26Basic Materials
Brown-Forman Corp.1.0%31Consumer Defensive
Expeditors International Of Washington, Inc.1.0%26Industrials
Ecolab, Inc.0.9%35Basic Materials
Cintas Corporation0.9%38Industrials
Sherwin-Williams Co.0.8%42Basic Materials
S&P Global Inc0.8%48Financial Services
Roper Technologies Inc0.5%28Industrials
West Pharmaceutical Services, Inc.0.2%27Healthcare

Numerous companies on this list have brand value that stretches all over the globe—including the likes of McDonald’s, Coca-Cola, and Walmart.

Vast global recognition and branding power is in part why these companies can generate cash flows to pay dividends for decades on end. For instance, 94% of the world population recognizes Coca-Cola’s logo.

Zooming In

Divident Aristocrats Sector Analysis Supplemental 2

The 65 Dividend Aristocrat stocks break down into 11 sectors. Across sectors, Industrials is the most crowded, consisting of 14 companies, with an average yield of 1.6% and a dividend growth duration of 43 years. Popular stocks in this sector include 3M and Caterpillar.

Next is the Consumer Defensive sector, containing 13 companies like Clorox, Target, Pepsi, and Procter & Gamble. The average yield is 2.2%, with an average growing duration of 49 years.

The highest yield by sector belongs to Energy, at 5.5%, but is only made up of only Chevron and Exxon Mobil. Their dividend track record may falter in the years to come, due to transitions away from the oil business. Just last year, Big Oil firms reported record net income losses, and Exxon was booted from the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA).

The Consumer Cyclical sector has been increasing their dividend for an average of 50 years, the longest of any sector. Lowe’s and McDonald’s are involved in this category.

Businesses for Today and Tomorrow

Although the Dividend Aristocrats list is published every year, the companies on the list are a stable bunch, meaning changes are fairly infrequent.

In a market climate in part shaped by low rates and compressed yields in the fixed income space, Dividend Aristocrats might be a particularly attractive alternative for investors with a longer-term outlook.

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The World’s Biggest Real Estate Bubbles in 2021

According to UBS, there are nine real estate markets that are in bubble territory with prices rising to unsustainable levels.

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Ranked: The World’s Biggest Real Estate Bubbles in 2021

Identifying real estate bubbles is a tricky business. After all, even though many of us “know a bubble when we see it”, we don’t have tangible proof of a bubble until it actually bursts.

And by then, it’s too late.

The map above, based on data from the Real Estate Bubble Index by UBS, serves as an early warning system, evaluating 25 global cities and scoring them based on their bubble risk.

Reading the Signs

Bubbles are hard to distinguish in real-time as investors must judge whether a market’s pricing accurately reflects what will happen in the future. Even so, there are some signs to watch out for.

As one example, a decoupling of prices from local incomes and rents is a common red flag. As well, imbalances in the real economy, such as excessive construction activity and lending can signal a bubble in the making.

With this in mind, which global markets are exhibiting the most bubble risk?

The Geography of Real Estate Bubbles

Europe is home to a number of cities that have extreme bubble risk, with Frankfurt topping the list this year. Germany’s financial hub has seen real home prices rise by 10% per year on average since 2016—the highest rate of all cities evaluated.

housing bubble index 2021

Two Canadian cities also find themselves in bubble territory: Toronto and Vancouver. In the former, nearly 30% of purchases in 2021 went to buyers with multiple properties, showing that real estate investment is alive and well. Despite efforts to cool down these hot urban markets, Canadian markets have rebounded and continued their march upward. In fact, over the past three decades, residential home prices in Canada grew at the fastest rates in the G7.

Despite civil unrest and unease over new policies, Hong Kong still has the second highest score in this index. Meanwhile, Dubai is listed as “undervalued” and is the only city in the index with a negative score. Residential prices have trended down for the past six years and are now down nearly 40% from 2014 levels.

Note: The Real Estate Bubble Index does not currently include cities in Mainland China.

Trending Ever Upward

Overheated markets are nothing new, though the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the dynamic of real estate markets.

For years, house price appreciation in city centers was all but guaranteed as construction boomed and people were eager to live an urban lifestyle. Remote work options and office downsizing is changing the value equation for many, and as a result, housing prices in non-urban areas increased faster than in cities for the first time since the 1990s.

Even so, these changing priorities haven’t deflated the real estate market in the world’s global cities. Below are growth rates for 2021 so far, and how that compares to the last five years.

housing bubble price increases 2021

Overall, prices have been trending upward almost everywhere. All but four of the cities above—Milan, Paris, New York, and San Francisco—have had positive growth year-on-year.

Even as real estate bubbles continue to grow, there is an element of uncertainty. Debt-to-income ratios continue to rise, and lending standards, which were relaxed during the pandemic, are tightening once again. Add in the societal shifts occurring right now, and predicting the future of these markets becomes more difficult.

In the short term, we may see what UBS calls “the era of urban outperformance” come to an end.

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Mapped: Distribution of Global GDP by Region

Where does the world’s economic activity take place? This cartogram shows the $94 trillion global economy divided into 1,000 hexagons.

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Map of Global Wealth Distribution

Mapped: The Distribution of Global GDP by Region

Gross domestic product (GDP) measures the value of goods and services that an economy produces in a given year, but in a global context, it is typically shown using country-level data.

As a result, we don’t often get to see the nuances of the global economy, such as how much specific regions and metro areas contribute to global GDP.

In these cartograms, global GDP has been normalized to a base number of 1,000 in order to show a more regional breakdown of economic activity. Created by Reddit user /BerryBlue_Blueberry, the two maps show the distribution in different ways: by nominal GDP and by GDP adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP).

Methodology

Before diving in, let us give you some context on how these maps were designed. Each hexagon on the two maps represents 0.1% of the world’s overall GDP.

The number below each region, country or metropolitan area represents the number of hexagons covered by that entity. So in the nominal GDP map, the state of New York represents 20 hexagons (i.e. 2.0% of global GDP), while Munich’s metro area is 3 hexagons (0.3%).

Countries are further broken down based on size. Countries that make up more than 0.95% of global GDP are broken down into subdivisions, while countries that are smaller than 0.1% of GDP are grouped together. Metro areas that account for over 0.25% of global GDP are featured.

Finally, it should be noted that to account for some outdated subdivision participation data, the map creator calculated 2021 estimates for this using the formula: national GDP (2021) x % of subdivision participation (2017-2020).

Nominal vs. PPP

The above map is using nominal data, while the below map accounts for differences in purchasing power (PPP).

Adjusting for PPP takes into account the relative value of currencies and purchasing power in countries around the world. For example, $100 (or its exchange equivalent in Indian rupees) is generally going to be able to buy more in India than it is in the United States.

This is because goods and services are cheaper in India, meaning you can actually purchase more there for the same amount of money.

Anomalies in Global GDP Distribution

Breaking down global GDP distribution into cartograms highlights some interesting anomalies worth considering:

  1. North America, Europe, and East Asia, with a combined GDP of nearly $75 trillion, make up 80% of the world’s GDP in nominal terms.
  2. The U.S. State of California accounts for 3.7% of the world’s GDP by itself, which ranks higher than the United Kingdom’s total contribution of 3.3%.
  3. Canada as a country accounts for 2% of the world’s GDP, which is comparable to the GDP contribution of the Greater Tokyo Area at 2.2%.
  4. With a GDP of $3 trillion, India’s contribution overshadows the GDP of the whole African continent ($2.6 trillion).
  5. This visualization highlights the economic might of cities better than a conventional map. One standout example of this is in Ontario, Canada. The Greater Toronto Area completely eclipses the economy of the rest of the province.

Inequality of GDP Distribution

The fact that certain countries generate most of the world’s economic output is reflected in the above cartograms, which resize countries or regions accordingly.

Compared to wealthier nations, emerging economies still account for just a tiny sliver of the pie.

India, for example, accounts for 3.2% of global GDP in nominal terms, even though it contains 17.8% of the world’s population.

That’s why on the nominal map, India is about the same size as France, the United Kingdom, or Japan’s two largest metro areas (Tokyo and Osaka-Kobe)—but of course, these wealthier places have a far higher GDP per capita.

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