The Richest Women in America in One Graphic
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The Richest Women in America in One Graphic

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Richest Women in America 23 Nov 2021

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The Richest Women in America in One Graphic

The majority of the world’s billionaires hail from the United States.

But of the 724 American billionaires whose net worths are tracked daily by Forbes, only 86 are women. That’s just 12% of the country’s billionaires.

This visualization examines the select few who have made the cut into this prestigious list, using data compiled from Forbes’ real-time billionaires list.

Note: All data is as of November 1, 2021 unless otherwise stated.

Top 10 Richest Women in America

Since 2020, MacKenzie Scott has donated over $8.5 billion and counting of her wealth. Yet, she still remains one of the richest women in the world. This is largely due to the Amazon shares that she received in her divorce settlement.

Amazon’s stock performance soared amid the pandemic, which resulted in the initial value of her shares ($38.3 billion) nearly doubling.

Top 10 overallNameNet WorthAgeSource of wealth
#1Alice Walton$68.1 B72Walmart
#2MacKenzie Scott$56.1 B51Amazon
#3Julia Koch & family$52.2 B59Koch Industries
#4Jacqueline Mars$31.5 B82Candy, pet food
#5Miriam Adelson$29.2 B76Casinos
#6Abigail Johnson$26.2 B59Money management
#7Laurene Powell Jobs & family$16.7 B57Apple, Disney
#8Diane Hendricks$11.7 B74Roofing
#9Ann Walton Kroenke$9.3 B72Walmart
#10Blair Parry-Okeden$8.8 B71Media, automotive

Miriam Adelson inherited her late husband’s 57% stake (worth ~$19 billion) in Las Vegas Sands, making her one of the richest newcomers to the Forbes list. The casinos have locations across Las Vegas, Singapore, and Macao.

Several of the women in this top 10 list also share membership with some of the richest families in America—from the Walmart Waltons, to the Johnsons at the helm of Fidelity Investments and Fidelity International.

The Oldest Richest Women in America

The oldest female billionaire in the world, Alice Schwartz, is 95 years old. She co-founded Bio-Rad Laboratories with her husband, which operates in the life sciences research and clinical diagnostics markets. They started the company in 1952 with only $720 in the bank.

OldestNameNet WorthAgeSource of wealth
#1Alice Schwartz$3.0 B95Biotech
#2Wilma Tisch$1.4 B94Diversified
#3Doris Fisher$2.8 B90Gap
#4Johnelle Hunt$4.7 B89Trucking
#5Marian Ilitch$4.4 B88Little Caesars
#6Pauline MacMillan Keinath$8.5 B87Cargill
#7Margot Birmingham Perot$4.2 B87Computer services, real estate
#8Martha Ingram & family$3.9 B86Book distribution, transportation
#9Janice McNair$4.2 B85Energy, sports
#10Norma Lerner$1.1 B85Banking

After her husband’s passing in 2018, Janice McNair (aged 85) took over his 80% stake in the NFL team Houston Texans, which ranks highly as one of the world’s most valuable sports teams. This also subsequently catapulted her position as being among the wealthiest sports owners in the country.

The Youngest Richest Women in America

In the online dating era, Whitney Wolfe Herd has made a name for herself. The female-first dating app she co-founded, Bumble, grew into a formidable competitor for her former employer, Match Group (which owns Tinder and OkCupid, among others).

At age 31, Wolfe Herd became the youngest self-made female CEO in the country after Bumble’s $2.2 billion IPO in February 2021.

YoungestNameNet WorthAgeSource of wealth
#1Whitney Wolfe Herd$1.2 B32Dating app
#2Rihanna$1.7 B33Cosmetics, music
#3Neha Narkhede$1.4 B37Software
#4Lynsi Snyder$4.2 B39In-N-Out Burger
#5Kim Kardashian West$1.2 B41Cosmetics, reality TV
#6Jane Lauder$6.7 B48Estée Lauder
#7Amy Wyss$2.0 B50Medical equipment
#8Sara Blakely$1.2 B50Spanx
#9MacKenzie Scott$56.1 B51Amazon
#10Aerin Lauder$4.2 B51Cosmetics

Wearing many hats from influencer to entrepreneur, socialite Kim Kardashian West’s cosmetics and fashion companies (KKW Beauty and shapewear line Skims) have catapulted her to a newfound billionaire status. She has a set of diverse revenue streams, from reality TV royalties to blue-chip and real estate investments.

Top 20 Self-Made Richest Women in America

The self-made label is an additional fascinating avenue to explore. Forbes defines this category as people who establish a fortune independently, rather than partly or wholly through inheritance.

One of the newest entrants into this mix is Rihanna. She already enjoyed significant success as an entertainer, with her claim to fame being one of the best-selling artists of the 2010s. However, it was her entrepreneurial spirit that put her on the Forbes list in August 2021. Rihanna owns 50% of her cosmetics company, Fenty Beauty. The other half is run by Bernard Arnault, who is among the world’s top billionaires.

Here is the rest of the top 20 self-made richest women in America:

Self-MadeNameNet WorthAgeSource of wealth
#1Diane Hendricks$11.7 B74Roofing
#2Judy Faulkner$6.5 B77Health IT
#3Meg Whitman$6.3 B65eBay
#4Judy Love$5.2 B84Retail and gas stations
#5Marian Ilitch$4.4 B88Little Caesars
#6Johnelle Hunt$4.1 B89Trucking
#7Thai Lee$4.1 B62IT Provider
#8Lynda Resnick$4.0 B78Agriculture
#9Gail Miller$3.2 B77Car dealerships
#10Doris Fisher$2.8 B90Gap
#11Alice Schwartz$3.0 B95Biotech
#12Oprah Winfrey$2.7 B67Media
#13Elaine Wynn$2.2 B79Casinos, hotels
#14Peggy Cherng$2.0 B73Fast food (Panda Express)
#15Sheryl Sandberg$1.9 B51Facebook
#16Rihanna$1.7 B33Cosmetics, music
#17Jayshree Ullal$1.7 B60Computer networking
#18Safra Catz$1.6 B59Software
#19Jenny Just$1.5 B53Fintech
#20Eren Ozmen$1.4 B62Aerospace

Source: Forbes, as of Aug 2021 (latest available)

For those paying attention to the rapid rise of the fintech industry, Jenny Just’s entry on this list will come as no surprise. Her firm, Apex Fintech Solutions powers the trading technology behind companies like SoFi and eToro. In fact, she has started or bought 15 businesses in the space in just 24 years.

As the richest women in America continue to make great strides, this list could look very different in coming years.

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Demographics

Animation: The Global Population Over 300 Years, by Country

This animated video shows how much the population has grown over the last three centuries, and which regions have driven this growth.

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Animation: The Global Population Over 300 Years, by Country

Since the 1800s, our global population has grown from 984 million people to almost 8 billion—an increase of more than 700%.

Which regions around the world have led this growth, and what’s expected for the rest of the century? This animated visualization by James Eagle shows 300 years of population growth, including historical figures as well as projections up to the year 2100.

Asia’s Current Dominance

For centuries, more than half of the world’s population has been concentrated in Asia. At certain points throughout history, the region has made up nearly 70% of the world’s population.

Here’s a look at 2021 figures, and how large each region’s population is relative to each other:

RankRegion% of Global Population (2021)
1Asia59.2%
2Africa17.9%
3Europe9.3%
4North America7.5%
5South America5.5%
6Oceania0.6%

China and India have been Asia’s largest population hubs, with China historically leading the front. In the 1950s China’s population was nearly double the size of India’s, but the gap has fluctuated over the years.

As China’s population growth continued, it was causing problems for the country as it struggled to scale up food production and infrastructure. By 1979, the Chinese government rolled out a one-child policy in an attempt to control the situation.

The program, which ended in 2016, had a number of unintended ramifications, but ultimately, it did succeed in slowing down the country’s population growth. And now, India is projected to overtake China as the world’s most populous country as early as 2023.

Africa’s Growing Piece of the Pie

Although Asia dominates the charts when it comes to overall population numbers currently, Africa’s growing population numbers are often overlooked.

While the continent’s total population is smaller than Asia’s, it will soon be home to the world’s largest working-age population, which could have a significant impact on the global economy in the years ahead.

This growth is being led by Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country. With megacities like Lagos (metro population: 21 million) and over 217 million inhabitants in total, Nigeria is projected to be the world’s third most populous country by the year 2050. Nigeria’s rapid growth is largely thanks to its high birth rate, which is nearly double the global average.

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Demographics

Charted: The Working Hours of Americans at Different Income Levels

This graphic shows the average working hours between higher and lower-income groups in America, based on income percentile.

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Average working hours in America

The Actual Working Hours of Different Income Levels

Do you really need to work 100-hour weeks for success?

In 2021, America’s top 10% of income earners made at least $129,181 a year—more than double the average individual income across the country.

When looking at differences between income groups, there are many preconceived notions about the work involved. But what are the actual average working hours for different income groups?

This graphic by Ruben Berge Mathisen uses the latest U.S. Census data to show the average working hours of Americans at different income levels.

Comparing Average Work Weeks

The data used for this graphic comes from the U.S. Census Bureau’s May 2022 Current Population Survey, which surveys more than 8,000 Americans from various socioeconomic backgrounds.

Importantly, the data reflects the average work hours that respondents in each income percentile “actually” work each week, and not what’s on their contract. This also includes overtime, other jobs, or side gigs.

According to the survey data, America’s top 10% income percentile works 4.4 hours more each week than those in the bottom 10%. And in surveys across other countries, though with hundreds of respondents instead of thousands, the discrepancy was similar:

While both income and wealth gaps are generally widening globally, it’s interesting to see that higher earners aren’t necessarily working more hours to achieve their increasingly larger salaries.

In fact, the top 10% in the 27 countries shown in the graphic are actually working around 1 hour less each week than the bottom 10%, at least among full-time workers.

Zooming Out: Average Working Hours per Country

Similarities arise when comparing average working hours across different countries. For starters, people living in poorer countries typically work longer hours.

According to Our World in Data, the average worker in Cambodia works about 9.4 hours a day, while in Switzerland, people work an average of 6 hours a day.

While many factors contribute to this discrepancy in working hours, one large factor cited is tech innovation, or things like physical machines, processes, and systems that make work more efficient and productive. This allows wealthier countries (and industries) to increase their output without putting in as many hours.

For example, from 1948 to 2011, farm production per hour in the U.S. became 16x more productive, thanks to innovations like improved machinery, better fertilizers, and more efficient land management systems.

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