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Ranked: The Reputation of 100 Major Brands in the U.S.

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Brand Reputation of 100 Companies in America

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Ranked: The Reputation of 100 Major Brands in the U.S.

Whether you’re a country or a company, brand reputation is crucial. For corporations trying to stand out amongst an array of competitors, name recognition can be make or break.

The Axios Harris Poll polled a nationally representative sample of nearly 43,000 Americans to find out which 100 companies emerge as top of mind—for better or for worse.

How is Brand Reputation Measured?

The polling process started by asking respondents which two companies they felt excelled or faltered in the U.S.—in other words, which companies were the most “visible” in their eyes.

The top 100 brands that emerged from this framework were then judged by poll respondents across seven dimensions, over three key pillars:

  • Character
    Includes a company’s culture, ethics, and citizenship (whether a consumer shares a company’s values or the company supports good causes)
  • Trajectory
    Includes a company’s growth prospects, vision for the future, and product and service offerings (whether they are innovative, and of high quality)
  • Trust
    Does a consumer trust the brand in the first place?

Once these dimensions are taken into account, the final scores portray how these “visible brands” rank in terms of their reputation among a representative sample of Americans:

  • Score range: 80.0 and above
    Reputation: Excellent
  • Score range: 75.0-79.9
    Reputation: Very Good
  • Score range: 70.0-74.9
    Reputation: Good
  • Score range: 65.0-69.9
    Reputation: Fair
  • Score range: 64.9 and below
    Reputation: Poor

Companies with a Very Poor reputation (a score below 50) didn’t make it into the list. Here’s how the 100 most visible companies stack up in terms of brand reputation:

2021 RankCompany2021 ScoreOverall Reputation
#1Patagonia82.7Excellent
#2Honda Motor Company81.6Excellent
#3Moderna81.3Excellent
#4Chick-fil-A81.1Excellent
#5SpaceX81.1Excellent
#6Chewy80.9Excellent
#7Pfizer80.2Excellent
#8Tesla Motors80.2Excellent
#9Costco80.1Excellent
#10Amazon.com80.0Excellent
#11REI79.9Very Good
#12USAA79.2Very Good
#13Wegmans79.2Very Good
#14Subaru79.2Very Good
#15Unilever79.2Very Good
#16Apple79.1Very Good
#17In-n-Out Burger78.7Very Good
#18Toyota Motor Corporation78.7Very Good
#19UPS78.6Very Good
#20PepsiCo78.5Very Good
#21IKEA78.4Very Good
#22Lowe's78.3Very Good
#23Publix Supermarkets78.2Very Good
#24CVS (CVS Health)78.2Very Good
#253M Company78.1Very Good
#26HP, Inc.78.1Very Good
#27Berkshire Hathaway78.0Very Good
#28Hulu77.9Very Good
#29Nestle77.7Very Good
#30The Kroger Company77.5Very Good
#31Samsung77.5Very Good
#32Paypal77.5Very Good
#33FedEx Corporation77.4Very Good
#34Sony77.3Very Good
#35Procter & Gamble Co.77.0Very Good
#36Microsoft76.8Very Good
#37The Walt Disney Company76.7Very Good
#38Netflix76.4Very Good
#39IBM76.3Very Good
#40General Electric76.1Very Good
#41Target76.0Very Good
#42Wayfair75.8Very Good
#43Citigroup75.7Very Good
#44American Express75.6Very Good
#45The Home Depot75.4Very Good
#46Walgreens75.3Very Good
#47Kaiser Permanente75.3Very Good
#48Best Buy75.2Very Good
#49Adidas75.1Very Good
#50Ford Motor Company75.1Very Good
#51Electronic Arts, Inc.74.7Good
#52State Farm Insurance74.7Good
#53Hobby Lobby74.5Good
#54JPMorgan Chase & Co.74.5Good
#55Kohl's74.4Good
#56T-Mobile74.3Good
#57Domino's Pizza73.7Good
#58The Coca-Cola Company73.7Good
#59Goya73.5Good
#60Google73.3Good
#61Verizon Communications73.2Good
#62Nike72.8Good
#63Nordstrom72.8Good
#64Macy's72.3Good
#65Starbucks Corporation72.3Good
#66eBay72.1Good
#67Wendy's72.1Good
#68General Motors72.0Good
#69Royal Dutch Shell71.6Good
#70Yum! Brands71.5Good
#71Dollar General71.4Good
#72Johnson & Johnson71.4Good
#73McDonald's71.1Good
#74Dollar Tree71.1Good
#75Fiat Chrysler Automobiles70.8Good
#76Chipotle70.8Good
#77Bank of America70.5Good
#78Reddit70.4Good
#79Robinhood70.4Good
#80ExxonMobil70.4Good
#81Delta Air Lines70.4Good
#82GameStop69.7Fair
#83Walmart69.7Fair
#84Burger King69.4Fair
#85BP68.2Fair
#86AT&T67.6Fair
#87United Airlines67.4Fair
#88Huawei Technologies67.1Fair
#89JCPenney66.3Fair
#90Uber66.2Fair
#91My Pillow66.0Fair
#92Comcast65.8Fair
#93Twitter63.4Poor
#94TikTok63.0Poor
#95Wells Fargo & Company63.0Poor
#96Sears Holdings Corporation61.2Poor
#97Wish.com60.7Poor
#98Facebook60.0Poor
#99Fox Corporation59.2Poor
#100The Trump Organization56.9Poor

While the ranking itself highlights well-respected and poorly-viewed brands overall, another perspective is to look at which brands shot up in the list, and which ones plummeted.

Fastest Risers in Brand Reputation

Unwavering and bold commitments to the environment has helped Patagonia to top the charts as the #1 brand, rising 31 ranks since 2020. From funneling 1% of sales into environmental donations to ensuring ethical supply chains, Patagonia’s culture, ethics, and citizenship all align with its business model in consumers’ eyes.

With over 33 million COVID-19 vaccine doses administered daily around the world, Pfizer’s contribution to the ongoing immunization progress is undeniable. As a result, its overall ranking has swelled by 54 places since 2020.

Rank in 2021Brand2021 ScoreChange
#7Pfizer80.2+54
#1Patagonia82.7+31
#15Unilever79.2+20
#71Dollar General71.4+19
#43Citigroup75.7+17
#2Honda Motor Company81.6+14
#24CVS (CVS Health)78.2+13
#27Berkshire Hathaway78+13
#50Ford Motor Company75.1+13
#56T-Mobile74.3+13

Dollar General might seem like a surprising addition to this table, but in terms of sheer growth, discount stores are thriving. Across America, dollar stores are opening at a rate of three per day, faster than any Starbucks or McDonalds.

There’s a crucial reason for this: in many rural areas, millions rely on dollar stores for food and other essentials, as the nearest grocery store can be nearly an hour’s drive away.

Biggest Decliners in Brand Reputation

Despite steady revenue growth, Google is among a handful of Big Tech companies whose reputations are backsliding, dropping 36 places in the past year. The outsize power and influence these companies hold is increasingly coming under regulatory scrutiny.

Rank in 2021Brand2021 ScoreChange
#60Google73.3-36
#35Procter & Gamble Co.77-27
#81Delta Air Lines70.4-24
#30The Kroger Company77.5-21
#38Netflix76.4-21
#70Yum! Brands71.5-21
#23Publix Supermarkets78.2-19
#36Microsoft76.8-17
#58The Coca-Cola Company73.7-17
#67Wendy's72.1-17

Although Netflix pioneered the world of streaming, it is now facing stiff competition from emerging subscription services. Amazon’s latest acquisition of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM Studios) will especially bolster the content catalog available on Prime Video.

Building a Brand Reputation Doesn’t Come Easy

Near the bottom of the 100 companies leaderboard, the struggles of mainstream media and modern information dissemination are strongly reflected. Despite their diverse audiences and established histories, brand reputations of both Facebook and Fox News have eroded in recent years.

This example highlights how the nature of a brand’s reputation can evolve over time. Building a strong and reputable brand may be subjective, but its effects on consumer loyalty are powerful.

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Revenue

Charting Revenue: How The New York Times Makes Money

This graphic tracks the New York Times’ revenue streams over the past two decades, identifying its transition from advertising to subscription-reliant.

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NYTimes advertisement to subscription

When it comes to quality and accessible content, whether it be entertainment or news, consumers are often willing to pay for it.

Similar to the the precedent set by the music industry, many news outlets have also been figuring out how to transition into a paid digital monetization model. Over the past decade or so, The New York Times (NY Times)—one of the world’s most iconic and widely read news organizations—has been transforming its revenue model to fit this trend.

This chart from creator Trendline uses annual reports from the The New York Times Company to visualize how this seemingly simple transition helped the organization adapt to the digital era.

New York Times revenue in a bar chart

The New York Times’ Revenue Transition

The NY Times has always been one of the world’s most-widely circulated papers. Before the launch of its digital subscription model, it earned half its revenue from print and online advertisements.

The rest of its income came in through circulation and other avenues including licensing, referrals, commercial printing, events, and so on. But after annual revenues dropped by more than $500 million from 2006 to 2010, something had to change.

NY Revenue By YearPrint CirculationDigital SubscriptionAdvertisingOtherTotal
2003$623M$1,196M$168M$1,987M
2004$616M$1,222M$165M$2,003M
2005$616M$1,262M$157M$2,035M
2006$637M$1,269M$172M$2,078M
2007$646M$1,223M$183M$2,052M
2008$668M$1,068M$181M$1,917M
2009$683M$797M$101M$1,581M
2010$684M$780M$93M$1,557M
2011$659M$47M$756M$93M$1,555M
2012$681M$114M$712M$88M$1,595M
2013$673M$151M$667M$86M$1,577M
2014$668M$172M$662M$86M$1,588M
2015$653M$199M$639M$89M$1,580M
2016$647M$232M$581M$94M$1,554M
2017$668M$340M$559M$109M$1,676M
2018$642M$400M$558M$148M$1,748M
2019$624M$460M$531M$198M$1,813M
2020$597M$598M$392M$196M$1,783M
2021$588M$774M$498M$215M$2,075M
2022$574M$979M$523M$233M$2,308M

In 2011, the NY Times launched its new digital subscription model and put some of its online articles behind a paywall. It bet that consumers would be willing to pay for quality content.

And while it faced a rocky start, with revenue through print circulation and advertising slowly dwindling and some consumers frustrated that once-available content was now paywalled, its income through digital subscriptions began to climb.

After digital subscription revenues first launched in 2011, they totaled to $47 million of revenue in their first year. By 2022 they had climbed to $979 million and accounted for 42% of total revenue.

Why Are Readers Paying for News?

More than half of U.S. adults subscribe to the news in some format. That (perhaps surprisingly) includes around four out of 10 adults under the age of 35.

One of the main reasons cited for this was the consistency of publications in covering a variety of news topics.

And given the NY Times’ popularity, it’s no surprise that it recently ranked as the most popular news subscription.

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