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Where Are the Oldest Companies in Existence?

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Oldest Companies in Existence

Where Are the Oldest Companies in Existence?

View the high resolution version of this infographic by clicking here.

In just a few decades, it’s possible that some of today’s most recognized companies may no longer be household names.

Corporate longevity, or the average lifespan of a company, has been shrinking dramatically.

In the 1960s, a typical S&P 500 company was projected to last for more than 60 years. However, with the rapidly transforming business landscape today, it’s down to just 18 years.

The Companies With the Strongest Staying Power

Even with companies skewing younger, there are always exceptions to the rule.

Luckily, many companies around the world have stood the test of time, and today’s detailed map from Business Financing highlights the oldest company in existence in each country.

For centuries, here are the world’s oldest corporations which have made their mark:

YearCompany NameCountryIndustry
578Kongō Gumi Co., Ltd.JapanConstruction
803St.  Peter Stifts KulinariumAustriaService Industry (Restaurant)
862Staffelter HofGermanyDistillers, Vintners, & Breweries (Winery)
864Monnaie de ParisFranceManufacturing & Production (Mint)
886The Royal MintEnglandManufacturing & Production (Mint)
900Sean’s BarIrelandService Industry (Pub)
1040Pontificia Fonderia MarinelliItalyManufacturing & Production (Bell foundry)
1074Affligem BreweryBelgiumDistillers, Vintners, & Breweries
1135Munke MølleDenmarkManufacturing & Production (Flour Mill)
1153Ma Yu Ching’s Bucket Chicken HouseChinaService Industry (Restaurant)

Whether they were born out of necessity to support a rapidly growing population—requiring new infrastructure and more money circulation—or simply to satisfy peoples’ thirst for alcohol or hunger for fried chicken, these companies continue to play a lasting role.

The Oldest Company in Every Country, by Region

Let’s dive into the regional maps, which paint a different picture for each continent.

In the following maps, countries are color-coded based on the major industry that the oldest company falls under:

  • Primary: Natural resources
  • Secondary: Manufacturing and processing
  • Tertiary: Services and distribution
  • Quaternary: Knowledge and information

Notes on Methodology:

This research considers both state-run and independent businesses in their definitions. For countries where data was hard to pin down, they have been grayed out.

As well, since many countries have a relatively new inception, present-day names and borders have been used. The map does not factor in older companies that are no longer in operation, or if it was unclear whether they were still open.

Click here to explore the full research methodology.

Oldest Company in every country in North America

North America

Mexico’s La Casa de Moneda de México (founded 1534) is the oldest company across North America, and the first mint of America. Owned by the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés, it was where the famous ‘pieces of eight’, or Spanish dollars were created.

In the U.S., the Shirley Plantation in Virginia is an ongoing reminder of the history of slavery. First founded in 1613, business actually began in 1638—and as many as 90 slaves were under indentured labor on the estate growing tobacco.

Further north, Canada’s Hudson’s Bay (founded 1670) was at the helm of the fur trade between European settlers and First Nations tribes—the two parties agreed on beaver pelts as a common, valuable trade standard.

Oldest Company in every country in North America

South America

Three of the five oldest companies in South America are mints—specifically in Brazil, Colombia, and Peru.

The oldest of these mints, Casa Nacional de Moneda in Peru, was built on order from Spain and established in 1565. After the great influx of newly-mined silver from America to Europe, the Spanish crown outlined to King Felipe II that building a mint would give the colony economic benefits and more control.

Oldest Company in every country in Europe

Europe

In total, 15 of Europe’s oldest companies are related to the food and beverage industries, from distilleries, vintners (winemaking), and breweries alongside restaurants and pubs. Austria’s St. Peter Stifts Kulinarium (founded in 803) is Europe’s oldest restaurant, located inside the St. Peter’s Abbey monastery.

Although Germany is famously known for its beer culture, its oldest company is in fact the Staffelter Hof Winery (founded in 862). Today, Germany is still a top wine country, with the industry generating up to $17 billion in revenue per year.

Oldest Company in every country in Asia

Asia

Asia has six oldest companies in the banking and finance category, as well as another six in the aviation and transport sector. The continent is also home to two of the world’s oldest companies, located in Japan and China.

The Japanese temple and shrine construction company, Kongō Gumi Co., Ltd. (founded in 578) has weathered a few storms over the millennia, from nuclear bombs to financial crises. In 2006, it was bought by the construction conglomerate, Takamatsu Construction Group Co., and continues to operate today.

In neighboring China, Ma Yu Ching’s Bucket Chicken House has endured dynasties of change as well. The company’s simple premise has come a long way, and it was named a cultural heritage in the country’s Henan Province.

Oldest Company in every country in Africa

Africa

Africa’s oldest companies are another vestige of the colonial legacy, with 11 transport companies—airlines, ports and shipping, and railways—and 9 postal services.

In fact, Cape Verde’s Correios de Cabo Verde (postal service, founded in 1849) and the DRC’s Société nationale des Chemins de fer du Congo (national railway company, founded in 1889) still go by their Portuguese and French names respectively.

Banking is another one of the oldest industries, with 17 companies across Africa. Zimbabwe’s Standard Chartered branch has been around since 1892, a subsidiary of its London-based parent company.

Oldest Company in every country in Oceania

Oceania

Australia officially became a country on January 1st, 1901—but its oldest company, the Australia Post (founded in 1809) precedes this by almost a century.

Interestingly, just one more old company could be located for this region, which is the Bank of New Zealand—one of the country’s Big Four banks.

All in all, these oldest companies paint a historical picture of the major industries which have shaped entire regions.

Did you recognize any on the list?

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12 Ways to Get Smarter in One Infographic

Highlighting and breaking down the 12 most useful and universal mental models that will make you smarter and more productive.

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12 Ways to Get Smarter in One Infographic

View the high resolution version of today’s graphic by clicking here.

The level of a person’s raw intelligence, as measured by aptitude tests such as IQ scores, is generally stable for most people during the course of their adulthood.

While it’s true that there are things you can do to fine tune your natural capabilities, such as doing brain exercises, solving puzzles, and getting optimal sleep—the amount of raw brainpower you have is difficult to increase in any meaningful or permanent way.

For those of us who constantly strive to be high-performers in our fields, this seems like bad news. If we can’t increase our processing power, then how can we solve life’s bigger problems as we move up the ladder?

The Key: Mental Models

The good news is that while raw cognitive abilities matter, it’s how you use and harness those abilities that really makes the difference.

The world’s most successful people, from Ray Dalio to Warren Buffett, are not necessarily leagues above the rest of us in raw intelligence—instead, they simply develop and learn to apply better mental models of how the world works, and they use these principles to filter their thoughts, decisions, strategies, and execution.

This infographic comes from best-selling author and entrepreneur Michael Simmons, who has collected over 650 mental models through his work. The infographic, in a similar style to one we previously published on cognitive biases, synthesizes these models down to the most useful and universal mental models that people should learn to master first.

Concepts such as the 80/20 rule (Pareto’s principle), compound interest, and network building are summarized in the visualization, and their major components are broken down further within the circle.

Mental Model Examples

Example #1: Pareto’s Principle (80/20 Rule for Prioritization)

In a recent Medium post by Simmons, he highlights a well-known mental model that is the perfect bread crumb to start with.

The 80/20 rule (Pareto’s principle) is named after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who was likely the first person to note the 80/20 connection in an 1896 paper.

In short, it shows that 20% of inputs (work, time, effort) often leads to 80% of outputs (performance, sales, revenue, etc.), creating an extremely vivid mental framework for making prioritization decisions.

80-20 law Pareto's principle

The 80/20 rule represents a power law distribution that has been empirically shown to exist throughout nature, and it also has huge implications on business.

If you focus your effort on these 20% of tasks first, and get the most out of them, you will be able to drive results much more efficiently than wasting time on the 80% “long-tail” shown below.

Power law distribution

Example #2: Metcalfe’s Law (Network Building)

Metcalfe’s Law is one of network effects, stating that a network’s value is proportional to the square of the number of nodes in the network.

From a mental model perspective, this is a useful way to understand how certain types of technology-driven businesses derive value.

If you have a smart grid that is only connected to one power source, that’s alright—but one connected to many different energy sources and potential consumers is much more useful for everyone on the grid. Each additional node provides value for the rest of the connections.

Metcalfe's Law illustrated

This mental model can be applied outside of strict technology or business terms as well.

For example, if you build a personal network of connections, each additional relationship can provide more value to the other people in your network. It’s the same principle that Harvard or other prestigious universities operate on: the more value a student can get from the alumni network, the higher price they can charge for tuition.

It’s hard to compete with a fully formed network at scale, as they create massive economic moats for the owner. Modern social networks and messaging apps like Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, TikTok, WhatsApp, and Snapchat all operate with this in mind.

The Power of Mental Models

These are just two examples of how powerful mental models can be effective in making you think clearer and work smarter.

If you want to be a top performer, it’s worth looking into other mental models out there as well. They can help you better frame reality, so that you can harness your intelligence and effort in the most effective way possible—and it’ll allow you to deliver results along the way.

This post was first published in 2018. We have since updated it, adding in new content for 2021.

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Ranked: The Reputation of 100 Major Brands in the U.S.

What comes to mind when you think of a good or bad brand? This poll ranks the brand reputation of 100 major companies in America.

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Ranked: The Reputation of 100 Major Brands in the U.S.

Whether you’re a country or a company, brand reputation is crucial. For corporations trying to stand out amongst an array of competitors, name recognition can be make or break.

The Axios Harris Poll polled a nationally representative sample of nearly 43,000 Americans to find out which 100 companies emerge as top of mind—for better or for worse.

How is Brand Reputation Measured?

The polling process started by asking respondents which two companies they felt excelled or faltered in the U.S.—in other words, which companies were the most “visible” in their eyes.

The top 100 brands that emerged from this framework were then judged by poll respondents across seven dimensions, over three key pillars:

  • Character
    Includes a company’s culture, ethics, and citizenship (whether a consumer shares a company’s values or the company supports good causes)
  • Trajectory
    Includes a company’s growth prospects, vision for the future, and product and service offerings (whether they are innovative, and of high quality)
  • Trust
    Does a consumer trust the brand in the first place?

Once these dimensions are taken into account, the final scores portray how these “visible brands” rank in terms of their reputation among a representative sample of Americans:

  • Score range: 80.0 and above
    Reputation: Excellent
  • Score range: 75.0-79.9
    Reputation: Very Good
  • Score range: 70.0-74.9
    Reputation: Good
  • Score range: 65.0-69.9
    Reputation: Fair
  • Score range: 64.9 and below
    Reputation: Poor

Companies with a Very Poor reputation (a score below 50) didn’t make it into the list. Here’s how the 100 most visible companies stack up in terms of brand reputation:

2021 RankCompany2021 ScoreOverall Reputation
#1Patagonia82.7Excellent
#2Honda Motor Company81.6Excellent
#3Moderna81.3Excellent
#4Chick-fil-A81.1Excellent
#5SpaceX81.1Excellent
#6Chewy80.9Excellent
#7Pfizer80.2Excellent
#8Tesla Motors80.2Excellent
#9Costco80.1Excellent
#10Amazon.com80.0Excellent
#11REI79.9Very Good
#12USAA79.2Very Good
#13Wegmans79.2Very Good
#14Subaru79.2Very Good
#15Unilever79.2Very Good
#16Apple79.1Very Good
#17In-n-Out Burger78.7Very Good
#18Toyota Motor Corporation78.7Very Good
#19UPS78.6Very Good
#20PepsiCo78.5Very Good
#21IKEA78.4Very Good
#22Lowe's78.3Very Good
#23Publix Supermarkets78.2Very Good
#24CVS (CVS Health)78.2Very Good
#253M Company78.1Very Good
#26HP, Inc.78.1Very Good
#27Berkshire Hathaway78.0Very Good
#28Hulu77.9Very Good
#29Nestle77.7Very Good
#30The Kroger Company77.5Very Good
#31Samsung77.5Very Good
#32Paypal77.5Very Good
#33FedEx Corporation77.4Very Good
#34Sony77.3Very Good
#35Procter & Gamble Co.77.0Very Good
#36Microsoft76.8Very Good
#37The Walt Disney Company76.7Very Good
#38Netflix76.4Very Good
#39IBM76.3Very Good
#40General Electric76.1Very Good
#41Target76.0Very Good
#42Wayfair75.8Very Good
#43Citigroup75.7Very Good
#44American Express75.6Very Good
#45The Home Depot75.4Very Good
#46Walgreens75.3Very Good
#47Kaiser Permanente75.3Very Good
#48Best Buy75.2Very Good
#49Adidas75.1Very Good
#50Ford Motor Company75.1Very Good
#51Electronic Arts, Inc.74.7Good
#52State Farm Insurance74.7Good
#53Hobby Lobby74.5Good
#54JPMorgan Chase & Co.74.5Good
#55Kohl's74.4Good
#56T-Mobile74.3Good
#57Domino's Pizza73.7Good
#58The Coca-Cola Company73.7Good
#59Goya73.5Good
#60Google73.3Good
#61Verizon Communications73.2Good
#62Nike72.8Good
#63Nordstrom72.8Good
#64Macy's72.3Good
#65Starbucks Corporation72.3Good
#66eBay72.1Good
#67Wendy's72.1Good
#68General Motors72.0Good
#69Royal Dutch Shell71.6Good
#70Yum! Brands71.5Good
#71Dollar General71.4Good
#72Johnson & Johnson71.4Good
#73McDonald's71.1Good
#74Dollar Tree71.1Good
#75Fiat Chrysler Automobiles70.8Good
#76Chipotle70.8Good
#77Bank of America70.5Good
#78Reddit70.4Good
#79Robinhood70.4Good
#80ExxonMobil70.4Good
#81Delta Air Lines70.4Good
#82GameStop69.7Fair
#83Walmart69.7Fair
#84Burger King69.4Fair
#85BP68.2Fair
#86AT&T67.6Fair
#87United Airlines67.4Fair
#88Huawei Technologies67.1Fair
#89JCPenney66.3Fair
#90Uber66.2Fair
#91My Pillow66.0Fair
#92Comcast65.8Fair
#93Twitter63.4Poor
#94TikTok63.0Poor
#95Wells Fargo & Company63.0Poor
#96Sears Holdings Corporation61.2Poor
#97Wish.com60.7Poor
#98Facebook60.0Poor
#99Fox Corporation59.2Poor
#100The Trump Organization56.9Poor

While the ranking itself highlights well-respected and poorly-viewed brands overall, another perspective is to look at which brands shot up in the list, and which ones plummeted.

Fastest Risers in Brand Reputation

Unwavering and bold commitments to the environment has helped Patagonia to top the charts as the #1 brand, rising 31 ranks since 2020. From funneling 1% of sales into environmental donations to ensuring ethical supply chains, Patagonia’s culture, ethics, and citizenship all align with its business model in consumers’ eyes.

With over 33 million COVID-19 vaccine doses administered daily around the world, Pfizer’s contribution to the ongoing immunization progress is undeniable. As a result, its overall ranking has swelled by 54 places since 2020.

Rank in 2021Brand2021 ScoreChange
#7Pfizer80.2+54
#1Patagonia82.7+31
#15Unilever79.2+20
#71Dollar General71.4+19
#43Citigroup75.7+17
#2Honda Motor Company81.6+14
#24CVS (CVS Health)78.2+13
#27Berkshire Hathaway78+13
#50Ford Motor Company75.1+13
#56T-Mobile74.3+13

Dollar General might seem like a surprising addition to this table, but in terms of sheer growth, discount stores are thriving. Across America, dollar stores are opening at a rate of three per day, faster than any Starbucks or McDonalds.

There’s a crucial reason for this: in many rural areas, millions rely on dollar stores for food and other essentials, as the nearest grocery store can be nearly an hour’s drive away.

Biggest Decliners in Brand Reputation

Despite steady revenue growth, Google is among a handful of Big Tech companies whose reputations are backsliding, dropping 36 places in the past year. The outsize power and influence these companies hold is increasingly coming under regulatory scrutiny.

Rank in 2021Brand2021 ScoreChange
#60Google73.3-36
#35Procter & Gamble Co.77-27
#81Delta Air Lines70.4-24
#30The Kroger Company77.5-21
#38Netflix76.4-21
#70Yum! Brands71.5-21
#23Publix Supermarkets78.2-19
#36Microsoft76.8-17
#58The Coca-Cola Company73.7-17
#67Wendy's72.1-17

Although Netflix pioneered the world of streaming, it is now facing stiff competition from emerging subscription services. Amazon’s latest acquisition of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM Studios) will especially bolster the content catalog available on Prime Video.

Building a Brand Reputation Doesn’t Come Easy

Near the bottom of the 100 companies leaderboard, the struggles of mainstream media and modern information dissemination are strongly reflected. Despite their diverse audiences and established histories, brand reputations of both Facebook and Fox News have eroded in recent years.

This example highlights how the nature of a brand’s reputation can evolve over time. Building a strong and reputable brand may be subjective, but its effects on consumer loyalty are powerful.

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