Ranked: The World's 25 Richest Millennial Billionaires
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Ranked: The World’s 25 Richest Millennial Billionaires

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Ranked: The World’s 25 Richest Millennial Billionaires

There are 2,755 billionaires globally—and combined, they are worth over $13 trillion.

Of these ultra wealthy individuals, just over 100 are millennials, born between the years 1981 and 1996. This young generation represents around 3.8% of all billionaires on a global basis with a combined net worth of $573.1 billion.

This visualization, using data from Forbes, ranks the richest 25 millennial billionaires and details their source of wealth, total net worth, nationality, and age.

Note: Forbes categorized billionaires by current age (2021). For those slightly over or under the age range of Millennials, meaning those who are currently 24 or 40 years old (i.e. they could have been born in either 1996/1997 or 1980/1981), if their birth year could not be accurately determined, they were left out of this ranking.

Who are the Millennial Billionaires?

The oldest millennials will be turning 40 in 2021, while the youngest are just turning 25. This means that millennial billionaires are generally the youngest billionaires in the world, save two Gen Zers: Wang Zelong of China, 24, and Kevin David Lehmann of Germany, 18.

NameAgeNet WorthCountryIndustry
Mark Zuckerberg36$97.0 BU.S.Tech
Zhang Yiming37$35.6 BChinaTech
Yang Huiyan & family39$29.6 BChinaReal Estate
Dustin Moskovitz36$17.8 BU.S.Tech
Su Hua39$17.8 BChinaMedia & Entertainment
Pavel Durov36$17.2 BRussiaTech
Lukas Walton34$15.6 BU.S.Fashion & Retail 
Eduardo Saverin39$14.6 BBrazilTech
Cheng Yixiao37$14.1 BChinaMedia & Entertainment
Brian Chesky39$13.7 BU.S.Tech
Nathan Blecharczyk37$12.4 BU.S.Tech
Joe Gebbia39$12.4 BU.S.Tech
Bobby Murphy32$11.9 BU.S.Tech
Evan Spiegel30$11.1 BU.S. Tech
Guillaume Pousaz39$9.0 BSwitzerlandFinance & Investments
Sam Bankman-Fried29$8.7 BU.S.Finance & Investments
Agnete Kirk Thinggaard37$8.7 BDenmarkManufacturing
Dmitry Bukhman35$7.9 BRussiaMedia & Entertainment
Igor Bukhman39$7.9 BRussiaMedia & Entertainment
Ernest Garcia, III.38$7.4 BU.S.Automotive
Brian Armstrong38$6.5 BU.S.Finance & Investments
Wang Ning & family34$6.3 BChinaMedia & Entertainment
Scott Duncan38$6.0 BU.S.Energy
David Velez39$5.2 BColombiaFinance & Investments
Kate Wang39$5.0 BChinaManufacturing 
Daniel Ek38$4.6 BSwedenTechnology
Gustav Magnar Witzoe27$4.4 BNorwayFood & Beverage
Steven Meng Yang & family38$4.2 BChinaTechnology
Li Xiang39$4.0 BChinaAutomotive
Ben Silbermann38$3.9 BU.S.Technology
Lynsi Snyder38$3.6 BU.S.Food & Beverage
Apoorva Mehta34$3.5 BCanadaTechnology
Franco Bittar Garcia37$3.5 BBrazilFashion & Retail 
Xu Yi31$3.4 BChina Media & Entertainment
RJ Scaringe38$3.4 BU.S.Automotive
Patrick Collison32$3.2 B Ireland Technology
John Collison30$3.2 BIrelandTechnology
Pedro de Godoy Bueno30$3.0 BBrazil Healthcare
Geoffrey Kwok35$3.0 BHong KongReal Estate
Yin Xin36$3.0 BChinaMedia & Entertainment
Huang Jinfeng38$3.0 BChinaFashion & Retail
Cameron Winklevoss39$3.0 BU.S.Finance & Investments
Tyler Winklevoss39$3.0 BU.S.Finance & Investments
Paul Sciarra40$2.9 BU.S. Technology
Chen Tianshi36$2.8 BChinaTechnology
Tony Xu36$2.8 BU.S.Technology
Victor Jacobsson39$2.7 BSwedenFiannce & Investments
Caroline Hagen Kjos37$2.6 BNorwayDiversified
Adam Kwok38$2.6 BHong KongReal Estate
André Street36$2.5 BBrazilFinance & Investments
Chang Jing38$2.5 BChinaTechnology
Byju Raveendran and Divya Gokulnath39$2.5 BIndiaTechnology
Austin Russell26$2.4 BU.S.Automotive
Jonathan Kwok29$2.4 BHong KongReal Estate
David Chen40$2.4 BSingaporeMedia & Entertainment
Tom Persson36$2.3 BSwedenFashion & Retail
Jared Isaacman38$2.3 BU.S. Technology
Andrew Paradise38$2.3 BU.S. Media & Entertainment
Sebastian Siemiatkowski39$2.2 BSwedenFinance & Investments
Timur Turlov33$2.1 BRussiaFinance & Investments
Gong Yingying36$2.1 BChinaHealthcare
Katarina Martinson39$2.1 BSwedenDiversified
Andy Fang28$2.0 BU.S.Technology
Stanley Tang28$2.0 BU.S. Technology
Christopher Kwok35$1.9 BHong KongReal Estate
Ipek Kirac36$1.9 BTurkeyDiversified
Kevin Systrom37$1.9 BU.S.Technology
Fred Ehrsam32$1.9 BU.S. Finance & Investments
Nick Molnar30$1.8 BAustraliaFinance & Investments
Joachim Ante38$1.8 BGermanyTechnology
Drew Houston38$1.8 BU.S. Technology
Said Gutseriev32$1.7 BRussiaEnergy
Ginia Rinehart34$1.7 BAustraliaMetals & Mining
Hope Welker35$1.7 BAustraliaMetals & Mining
Bill Liu38$1.7 BChinaTechnology
Peter Szulczewski39$1.7 BCanadaTechnology
Lisa Draexlmaier30$1.6 BGermanyAutomotive
Eva Maria Braun-Luedicke34$1.6 BGermanyHealthcare
Heikki Herlin34$1.6 BFinlandManufacturing
Ryan Cohen35$1.6 BCanadaFiannce & Investments
Friederike Braun-Luedicke37$1.6 BGermanyHealthcare
Wen Yilong32$1.5 BChinaManufacturing
Zeng Chaolin38$1.5 BChinaMetals & Mining
Alexandra Andresen24$1.4 BNorwayDiversified
Katharina Andresen25$1.4 BNorwayDiversified
Karl Friedrich Braun38$1.4 BGermanyHealthcare
Trevor Milton39$1.4 BU.S.Automotive
Ludwig Theodor Braun31$1.3 BGermanyHealthcare
Anna Kasprzak31$1.3 BDenmark Fashion & Retail
Whitney Wolfe Herd31$1.3 BU.S.Technology
André Kasprzak34$1.3 BDenmarkFashion & Retail
Hakan Koc36$1.2 BGermanyAutomotive
Nik Storonsky36$1.2 BUKTechnology
Christian Bertermann37$1.2 BGermanyAutomotive
Ryan Graves37$1.2 BU.S.Technology
Cheng Wei38$1.2 BChinaService
Lu Zhilin38$1.2 BChinaManufacturing
Sachin Bansal39$1.2 BIndiaFashion & Retail
Huang Yimeng39$1.2 BChinaMedia & Entertainment
Wang Han33$1.1 BChinaDiversified
Anne Werninghaus35$1.1 BBrazil Manufacturing
Binny Bansal38$1.1 BIndiaTechnology
Sanjit Biswas39$1.1 BU.S.Technology
Vlad Tenev34$1.0 BU.S.Fiannce & Investments
Baiju Bhatt36$1.0 BU.S.Finance & Investments
Hou Jianbin39$1.0 BChinaService

The U.S. is home to the most millennial billionaires at 33 total, with China coming in second at 23—most other countries fall far behind.

In the U.S., millennial billionaires are often associated with notable tech companies like Snapchat, Airbnb, and Facebook. Others are heirs of massive family fortunes like Lukas Walton—grandson of Sam Walton, the founder of Walmart and the original head of America’s richest family.

In China, some millennial billionaires really stand out, like Relx founder, Kate Wang. The 39-year-old started her e-cigarette and vape company only three years ago, at age 36, and is expected to soon be vying for the title of richest woman in China.

Billionaire Growth

Overall, billionaires were up $8 trillion in combined net worth compared to 2020 with around 493 new people added to the list in 2021.

In fact, 86% of all billionaires are richer than a year ago. But let’s look at how wealth changed for the millennials in the billionaires club. Here’s a look at the difference in net worth from 2020 to 2021 for the top five richest millennials:

  • Mark Zuckerberg: +$35 Billion
  • Zhang Yiming: +$19.4 Billion
  • Yang Huiyan: +$9.3 Billion
  • Dustin Moskovitz: +$8.5 Billion
  • Su Hua: +$14.9 Billion

For each of the top 25 millennial billionaires, net worth either increased or was unchanged (or they were new to the title of billionaire). This is true for all except one person—Lukas Walton, whose net worth decreased by almost $3 billion from 2020 to 2021.

The Average Millennial

While there are around 106 millennial billionaires worldwide, their combined net worth is only a fraction of total billionaire wealth. So how much economic power and influence does this generation really hold?

When looking at the average American millennial’s wealth, the Generational Power Index has determined that this young generation only holds 9.6% of economic power in the U.S. Here’s a quick look at millennial wealth metrics in the U.S.:

  • Millennials only make up 7% of American business leaders
  • They own $73 billion in equities and mutual fund shares
  • They represent 13% of small business leaders
  • They make up 7% of American billionaire wealth

Globally, there are an estimated 1.8 billion millennials. Among that cohort, there are just over 100 people worth billions—and given that many are still in the early part of their careers, there is likely to be many millennial billionaires yet to come.

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Personal Finance

How Does Your Personality Type Affect Your Income?

Can your Myers–Briggs personality type impact how much you make? See for yourself with this breakdown of average income for all 16 personality types.

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How Does Your Personality Type Affect Your Income?

You’ve just finished giving a presentation at work, and an outspoken coworker challenges your ideas. Do you:

a) Engage in a friendly debate about the merits of each argument, or

b) Avoid a conflict by agreeing or changing the subject?

The way you approach this type of situation may influence how much money you earn.

Today’s infographic comes to us from Truity, and it outlines the potential relationship between personality type and income.

Through the Myers-Briggs Lens

The Myers-Briggs personality test serves as a robust framework for analyzing the connection between personality and income, in a way that is easily understood and familiar to many people.

The theory outlines four personality dimensions that are described using opposing traits.

  • Extraversion vs. Introversion: Extroverts gain energy by interacting with others, while introverts draw energy from spending time alone.
  • Sensing vs. Intuition: Sensors prefer concrete and factual information, while intuitive types use their imagination or wider patterns to interpret information.
  • Thinking vs. Feeling: Thinkers make rational decisions based on logic, while feelers make empathetic decisions considering the needs of others.
  • Judging vs. Perceiving: Judging types organize their life in a structured manner, while perceiving types are more flexible and spontaneous.

For example, someone who aligns with extraversion, sensing, thinking, and judging would be described as an ESTJ type.

The researchers surveyed over 72,000 people to measure these four personality preferences, as well as 23 unique facets of personality, income levels, and career-related data.

Traits With the Highest Earning Potential

Based on the above four dimensions, extroverts, sensors, thinkers, and judgers tend to be the most financially successful. Diving into specific personality characteristics, certain traits are more closely correlated with higher income.

Personality TypeAverage Income Advantage (Annual)Trait(s) Most Correlated With Income Advantage
Extroverts$9,347Expressive, Energetic, Prominent
Sensors$1,910Conceptual
Thinkers$8,411Challenging, Objective, Rational
Judgers$6,903Ambitious

For instance, extroverts are much more likely to have higher incomes if they are quick to share thoughts, have high energy, and like being in the public eye. Thinkers also score high on income potential, especially if they enjoy debates, make rational decisions, and moderate their emotions.

The Top Earners

Which personality types earn the highest incomes of all? Extroverted thinking types dominate the ranks again.

Myers-briggs personality highest earners

Source: Truity

The one exception is INTJs, with 10% earning an annual salary of $150K or more in their peak earning years.

Personality and the Gender Pay Gap

With all these factors in mind, the researchers analyzed whether personality differences would affect the gender pay gap.

When the average salaries were separated for men and women, the results were clear: men of almost all personality types earn more than the average income for the sample overall, while all but two personality types of women earned less than the average.

Myers briggs personality gender pay gap

Source: Truity

In fact, women with high-earning personality types still earn less than men who do not possess those traits. For example, extroverted women earn about $55,000 annually, while introverted men earn an average of over $64,000.

Maximizing Your Potential

Are the introverted personalities of the world doomed to lower salaries? Not necessarily—while personality does play a role, many other factors contribute to income levels:

  • Level of education
  • Years of experience
  • Local job market
  • Type of industry
  • The particular career

Not only that, anyone can work on the two specific personality traits most aligned with higher incomes: set ambitious goals, and face conflict head-on to ensure your voice is heard.

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Misc

Mapped: The World’s Biggest Private Tax Havens

What countries or territories do the ultra-wealthy use as tax havens?

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Biggest Tax Havens Share

The World’s Biggest Private Tax Havens

When the world’s ultra-wealthy look for tax havens to shield income and wealth from their domestic governments, where do they turn?

If you’re putting money in offshore bank accounts in order to save on taxes, there are two main criteria you’re looking for: secrecy and accessibility. Based on pop culture and media reports, you might imagine a secretive bank in Switzerland or a tiny island nation in the Caribbean.

And though there is some truth to that logic, the reality is that the world’s biggest tax havens are spread all over the world. Some of them are small nations as expected, but others are major economic powers that might be surprising.

Here are the world’s top 20 tax havens, as ranked by the 2020 Financial Secrecy Index (FSI) by the English NGO Tax Justice Network.

Which Countries are the Biggest Tax Havens?

The FSI ranks countries and territories from all over the world on two criteria: secrecy and scale.

  • Secrecy Score: How well the jurisdiction’s banking system can hide money. This includes analysis of ownership registration, legal entity transparency, tax and financial regulations, and cooperation with international standards.
  • Global Scale Weight: What is the jurisdiction’s share of the world’s total cross-border financial services? This metric is based primarily on the IMF’s Balance of Payments statistics.

By weighing a country’s ability to hide money by its relative share of offshore financial services, we see the tax havens with the biggest impact on the global economy.

RankJurisdictionRegion
1🇰🇾 Cayman IslandsCaribbean
2🇺🇸 United StatesNorth America
3🇨🇭 SwitzerlandEurope
4🇭🇰 Hong KongEast Asia
5🇸🇬 SingaporeSoutheast Asia
6🇱🇺 LuxembourgEurope
7🇯🇵 JapanEast Asia
8🇳🇱 NetherlandsEurope
9🇻🇬 British Virgin IslandsCaribbean
10🇦🇪 United Arab EmiratesMiddle East
11🇬🇬 GuernseyEurope
12🇬🇧 United KingdomEurope
13🇹🇼 TaiwanEast Asia
14🇩🇪 GermanyEurope
15🇵🇦 PanamaCaribbean
16🇯🇪 JerseyEurope
17🇹🇭 ThailandSoutheast Asia
18🇲🇹 MaltaEurope
19🇨🇦 CanadaNorth America
20🇶🇦 QatarMiddle East

At a glance, the top 20 tax havens are spread out across regions. Just under half of the list is located in Europe, but the rest are spread out across the Americas and Asia.

And the jurisdictions are opposites in many ways. They include financial powerhouses like the U.S., Japan, and the UK as well as smaller nations and territories like the Cayman Islands, Hong Kong, and Luxembourg.

But one surprising thing many of them have in common is a link to England. In addition to the UK, four of the top 20 tax havens—Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands, Guernsey, and Jersey—are British Overseas Territories or Crown Dependencies.

Also worth noting is the importance of scale in the rankings. The highest ranking jurisdictions by secrecy score were actually the Maldives, Angola and Algeria, but they represent less than 0.1% of total offshore financial services.

Best Place To Hide Private Vs. Corporate Tax

Some of the listed tax havens might be confusing to nationals of those countries, but that’s where relativity is important. The U.S. and Canada might not be tax havens for American or Canadian nationals, but the ultra-wealthy from East Asia and the Middle East are reported to utilize them due to holes in foreign tax laws. Likewise, the UAE has reportedly become a tax haven for Africa’s ultra-wealthy.

In addition, many of the countries used as tax havens for individual wealth are also utilized by corporations.

The Tax Justice Network’s 2021 assessment of corporate tax havens listed the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, and Bermuda as the top three tax corporate tax havens.

While individuals might create shell companies in tax havens to hide their wealth, corporations are usually directly incorporated in the tax haven in order to defer taxes.

But the tax haven landscape might soon shift. The G7 struck a deal in June 2021 to start taxing multinational corporations based on the revenue generated in each country (instead of where the company is based), as well as setting a global minimum tax of 15%. In total, a group of 130 countries have agreed to the deal, including India, China, the UK, and the Cayman Islands.

As the campaign to bring back deferred taxes ramps up, the question becomes one of response. Will the ultra-wealthy individuals and corporations start to work in tandem with the new rules, or discover new workarounds and tax havens?

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