Mapped: The 25 Poorest Countries in the World - Visual Capitalist
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Mapped: The 25 Poorest Countries in the World

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poorest countries by GDP per capita

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The Briefing

  • The poorest country in the world is Burundi with a GDP per capita of $264
  • Nearly all of the world’s poorest countries are in Africa, though Haiti, Tajikistan, Yemen, and Afghanistan are notable exceptions

Mapped: The 25 Poorest Countries in the World

Having looked at the richest countries in the world, which nations are at the bottom of the list in terms of GDP per capita, in nominal terms?

This map looks at the world’s 25 poorest countries by this metric.

Country GDP per capita (USD)
🇧🇮 Burundi$263.67
🇸🇸 South Sudan$303.15
🇲🇼 Malawi$399.10
🇲🇿 Mozambique$455.01
🇨🇩 Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)$456.89
🇨🇫 Central African Republic$480.50
🇦🇫 Afghanistan$499.44
🇲🇬 Madagascar$514.85
🇸🇱 Sierra Leone$518.47
🇳🇪 Niger$535.83
🇪🇷 Eritrea$585.16
🇹🇩 Chad$639.85
🇾🇪 Yemen$645.13
🇱🇷 Liberia$653.60
🇹🇬 Togo$690.28
🇭🇹 Haiti$732.07
🇸🇩 Sudan$734.60
🇬🇲 The Gambia$746.33
🇬🇼 Guinea-Bissau$766.75
🇧🇫 Burkina Faso$768.83
🇷🇼 Rwanda$823.40
🇹🇯 Tajikistan$833.55
🇲🇱 Mali$899.22
🇺🇬 Uganda$915.35
🇿🇼 Zimbabwe$921.85

All but four of these countries are located on the African continent.

Additionally, all of the 25 poorest countries, with the exception of Zimbabwe and Tajikistan, are considered Least Developed Countries (LDCs) by the UN. LDCs are categorized by criteria based on per capita income, human assets (such as education level), and economic vulnerability. Today, more than 75% of the population in LDCs live below the poverty line.

For added perspective, the average GDP per capita of all developing economies and emerging markets globally is $5,172.

Emerging Markets

Developing countries, while having much smaller economies, have one thing that the richest countries don’t have: immense room for economic growth.

Most of the poorest countries’ strongest industries are agriculture, mining, manufacturing, and so on, and the world is heavily reliant on the flow of raw materials and resources coming from developing nations.

Focusing on the African countries listed, the economic potential is significant. Africa’s infrastructure is currently improving at a rapid rate, opening the door for foreign direct investment and increased capacity for industrialization. In large part, this progress is thanks to China’s Belt and Road initiative and investment in multiple African countries.

Another signal of Africa’s potential is the extremely large share of young people on the continent. Here’s a look at the five countries in the world with the highest shares of their population aged younger than 15, all of which are in Africa:

  • 🇳🇪 Niger: 49.8%
  • 🇲🇱 Mali: 47.3%
  • 🇹🇩 Chad: 46.8%
  • 🇦🇴 Angola: 46.6%
  • 🇺🇬 Uganda: 46.5%

In Niger, an astounding near half of the population is under the age of 15 years old. This could translate into a large future workforce, a growing domestic market, and potential for innovation and economic progress.

Overall, while today the poorest countries still have extremely low standards of living, the economic potential is there for future growth.

Where does this data come from?

Source: IMF
Details: GDP per capita is measured in $USD, 2020.

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Datastream

Charted: The Ukraine War Civilian Death Toll

Using data from the UN, this chart shows civilian death toll figures resulting from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

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Ukraine war death toll

The Briefing

  • In total, since the war began in February there have been over 7,031 Ukrainian civilian deaths
  • Most of the civilian casualties recorded were caused by the use of explosive weapons, such as missiles and heavy artillery

Charted: The Ukraine War Civilian Death Toll

Russia’s war of aggression in Ukraine has wrought suffering and death on a mass scale, with many Russian attacks targeted at civilians.

We’ve created this visual using data from the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to better understand how many civilians have died in Ukraine as a result of the war, as well as how many were injured and how many were children.

The Numbers

As of early December, it is reported that 7,031 people in Ukraine have died because of the war — 433 of them children. Another 11,327 have been injured, 827 of which are children. In total, this is over 18,000 people killed or injured.

The figures are difficult to verify due to differing reports coming out of both Russia and Ukraine. The UN OHCHR anticipates that the numbers could be even higher.

The State of the Conflict

The war began on February 24th, 2022 and less than a year in, millions of people have been displaced by the conflict, and thousands of civilians have been injured or killed.

According to the UN, most of the civilian deaths have been caused by wide-ranging explosives such as heavy artillery shelling, missiles, and air strikes, and have been concentrated in Donetsk and Luhansk and in other territory still held by Ukraine.

Additionally, new estimates from Kyiv report approximately 13,000 Ukrainian military or soldier deaths, which has yet to be confirmed by the army.

Where does this data come from?

Source: The United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights monthly reports on civilian deaths in Ukraine.

Note: Data on deaths and injuries can vary wildly depending on the source.

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