Connect with us

Demographics

Map: Where Young Adults Live With Their Parents in the U.S.

Published

on

Map: Where Young Adults Live With Their Parents in the U.S.

For a variety of different reasons, there is a growing proportion of young adults that are living with their parents in the United States.

As of 2017, it’s estimated that 34.5% of young adults (18-34 years old) in the U.S live at home – one of the highest percentages in recent memory. How does this national average compare to individual states, and how does data break down further by age and gender over time?

Living at Home

Today’s interactive map comes to us from Overflow Data, and visualizes data at the state level, showing a wide range from 16% (D.C., North Dakota) to closer to 47% (New Jersey).

Here are the five states with the highest proportion of young adults living at home:

RankStatePopulation (Young Adults)% Living at Home
#1New Jersey1.9 million47.3%
#2Connecticut0.7 million42.0%
#3New York4.5 million40.5%
#4Florida4.3 million40.0%
#5California9.4 million39.3%

New Jersey is the surprising leader here, with 47.3% of young adults between 18-34 years living at home. This is at least partially a result of the state’s proximity to big cities like New York City and Philadelphia, in which young adults choose to commute instead of renting or buying places in those cities themselves.

With higher housing costs and rents, it’s also not surprising to see other states with large populations like California, Florida, and New York as being well represented at the top of the list.

Differences by Age

While figures are going up across the board, a particular subsegment (25-34 years old) stands out as rising to its highest point in at least 30 years.

Both men and women in this older millennial segment are starting to become more likely to stay at home:

Where Young Adults Live With Their Parents in the U.S.

There are many potential culprits for this trend, including social and economic factors.

It’s well-documented that millennials are marrying later, which is a traditional impetus for moving away from home. Today’s young adults are also putting off having kids until later in adulthood.

At the same time, on the economic front, higher housing prices and mounting student debt are two factors that are preventing young adults from having the necessary resources to move out as early as they might like.

What do you think is the major cause behind this trend, and do you think it will reverse?

Subscribe to Visual Capitalist

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading
Comments

Demographics

Interactive: How Do Americans Differ by Age?

This interactive infographic allows you sort data on the U.S. population using a variety of topics, to see how Americans differ by age.

Published

on

Interactive: How Do Americans Differ by Age?

The human experience changes dramatically over the course of a lifetime.

While we each intrinsically know that our days as teenagers will be vastly different from those as senior citizens, it is interesting to see how this looks from a 10,000-foot perspective.

Using demographic data on the American populace, we can spot key differences between age groups, including some aspects that make each generation of Americans unique.

The U.S. Population, by Age

Today’s interactive data visualization comes to us from Overflow Data, and it charts out the entire U.S. population by age group.

The graphic allows you to sort demographics based on data pertaining to specific topicsโ€”such as whether people own or rent their houseโ€”to see how age affects answers to these different questions. The interactive visualization also allows you to filter results by geographic region, sex, marital status, or employment status.

Data here comes from the 2017 Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) via the American Community Survey, which is published by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Gauging Differences

Let’s dive into how American differ by age, by looking at some specific charts:

Employment Status, by Age

This is a simple one to start with, but it makes it easy to see how the data works. In the below chart, it’s evident that most younger and older Americans are not in the labor force, while the majority of working age Americans are employed or seeking work (unemployed).

Employment Status of Americans, by Age

Own or Rent, by Age

How about looking at whether Americans own or rent, or even if they live in a group quarters?

Own or Rent, by Age

Race, by Age

The below chart is sorted by percentile, and it shows the percentage of individuals by race according to their age group. As the population skews younger, so does its racial diversity.

Race, by Age

Marital Status, by Age

The below chart is sorted by percentile, and it shows the marital status (married, divorced, etc.) of different age groups.

Marital Status, by Age

The Generational Effect

For more on how Americans differ by age, learn about how different generations approach the workplace, as well as how they think about investing.

Subscribe to Visual Capitalist

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading

Cities

Ranking the World’s Most Populous Cities, Over 500 Years of History

This two-minute animation shows changes in the last 500 years of historical rankings for the world’s 10 most populous cities.

Published

on

Animation: The Most Populous Cities, Over 500 Years

What do Beijing, Tokyo, Istanbul, London, and New York City all have in common?

Not only are they all world-class cities that still serve as global hubs of commerce, but these cities also share a relatively rare and important historical designation.

At specific points in history, each of these cities outranked all others on the planet in terms of population, granting them the exclusive title as the single most populated city globally.

Ranking the World’s Most Populous Cities

Today’s animation comes to us from John Burn-Murdoch with the Financial Times, and it visualizes cities ranked by population in a bar chart race over the course of a 500-year timeframe.

Beijing starts in the lead in the year 1500, with a population of 672,000:

RankCityPopulation in Year 1500
#1๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ Beijing672,000
#2๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ Vijayanagar500,000
#3๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ Cairo400,000
#4๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ Hangzhou250,000
#5๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ท Tabriz250,000
#6๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ Gauda200,000
#7๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ท Istanbul200,000
#8๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท Paris185,000
#9๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ Guangzhou150,000
#10๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ Nanjing147,000

In the 16th century, which is where the animation starts, cities in China and India were dominant in terms of population.

In China, the cities of Beijing, Hangzhou, Guangzhou, and Nanjing all made the top 10 list, while India itself held two of the most populous cities at the time, Vijayanagar and Gauda.

If the latter two names sound unfamiliar, that’s because they were key historical locations in the Vijayanagara and Bengal Empires respectively, but neither are the sites of modern-day cities.

The 1 Million Mark

For the first minute of animationโ€”and up until the late 18th centuryโ€”not a single city was able to eclipse the 1 million person mark.

However, thanks to the Industrial Revolution, the floodgates opened up. With more efficient agricultural practices, better sanitation, and other technological improvements, cities were able to support bigger populations.

Here’s a look at the biggest cities in the year 1895:

RankCityPopulation in Year 1895
#1๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง London5,974,000
#2๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ New York3,712,000
#3๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท Paris3,086,000
#4๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ Chicago1,420,000
#5๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ต Tokyo1,335,000
#6๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡บ St. Petersburg1,286,000
#7๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง Manchester1,244,000
#8๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง Birmingham1,074,000
#9๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ Beijing1,055,000
#10๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡บ Moscow1,002,000

In the span of roughly a century, all of the world’s biggest cities were able to pass the 1 million mark, making it no longer a particularly exclusive milestone.

Modern City Populations

Finally, let’s look at the modern list of the top 10 most populous cities, and see how it compares to rankings from previous years:

RankCityPopulation in Year 2018
#1๐Ÿ‡ฏ๐Ÿ‡ต Tokyo38,194,000
#2๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ Delhi27,890,000
#3๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ Shanghai25,779,000
#4๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ Beijing22,674,000
#5๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ Mumbai22,120,000
#6๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ท Sao Paulo21,698,000
#7๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฝ Mexico City21,520,000
#8๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ฌ Cairo19,850,000
#9๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฉ Dhaka19,633,000
#10๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ New York City18,713,000

Interestingly, the modern list appears to be a blend of both previous rankings from the years 1500 and 1895, listed above.

In 2018, cities from China and India feature prominently, but New York City and Tokyo are also included. Meanwhile, Latin America has entered the fold with entries from Mexico and Brazil.

The Future of Megacities

If you think the modern list of the most populous cities is impressive, check out how the world’s megacities are expected to develop as we move towards the end of the 21st century.

Subscribe to Visual Capitalist

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading
Agrios Global Company Spotlight

Subscribe

Join the 100,000+ subscribers who receive our daily email

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Popular