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How Leadership Accountability Drives Company Performance

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Leadership plays a big role in determining the success of an organization.

Effective and accountable leadership can help propel a company forward. On the flip side, a failure to live up to the expectations of leadership can have cascading and lingering effects across an entire organization.

Bridging the Leadership Accountability Gap

Today’s infographic, from bestselling author Vince Molinaro, is a revealing look at the impact that leadership accountability can have on an organization.

Leadership Accountability

Pre-order Vince Molinaro’s new book, Accountable Leaders

The Value of Leadership Accountability

The majority of people within organizations understand the value of leadership accountability – yet, in practice, many leaders fail to deliver on that promise.

A global survey of over 2,000 HR leaders and senior executives revealed that a mere 27% believed they had a strong leadership culture. Two-thirds of those surveyed believed that leadership accountability is a critical issue within their organization, while only one-third are satisfied with the degree of leadership accountability demonstrated at in their workplace.

What impact does this leadership accountability gap have on the performance of a company? As it turns out, a lot.

The Critical Link Between Accountability and Performance

Once survey responses were organized into three distinct categories – low performers, average performers, and industry leaders – interesting trends began to emerge.

Companies in the “industry leaders” category were far more likely to have a culture of leadership accountability. In fact, industry leaders were twice as likely to have clearly established expectations for their leadership team than respondents in the average or lower performing categories. These high performing companies were also far more likely to:

  • Have formal succession programs to help identify high-potential leaders
  • Have practices in place to foster more diverse leadership teams
  • Implement development programs to effectively build the capacity of leaders

Industry leading companies had leadership teams that ranked higher in a number of key areas. Leaders at high performing companies were far more likely to:

  • Understand customer needs and desires
  • Understand external trends affecting the business
  • Demonstrate a high level of emotional maturity
  • Demonstrate passion for executing on the company’s vision

In many of these areas, the gap between industry leaders and the other categories is significant, which presents a compelling case for embracing leadership accountability as a core value.

Building a Strong Leadership Culture: Questions to Ask

The first step to building a culture of leadership accountability is self reflection. Here are questions leaders can ask to help assess how their organization is doing:

  1. Is leadership accountability a critical priority in your organization?
  2. Has your organization set clear leadership expectations for leaders?
  3. Do you believe your leaders at all levels, are fully committed to their leadership roles?
  4. Have you built a strong and aligned leadership culture across your organization?
  5. Does your organization have the courage to identify and address mediocre leadership at an individual and team level?

Answering “no” to any of the questions above means there’s an opportunity to develop a more accountable and effective leadership team.

Only three things happen naturally in organizations. Friction, confusion and underperformance. Everything else requires leadership.

– Peter Drucker

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Financing

Which Country is the Cheapest for Starting a Business?

These maps show the most (and least) costly countries for starting a business by relative costs.

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Cost of Starting A Business By Country Share

Which Country is the Cheapest for Starting A Business?

Starting a new business isn’t as simple as coming up with an idea.

In addition to the time investment needed to formulate and create a business, there’s often a hefty capital requirement. A new business usually requires paying different fees for licensing, permits, and approvals, and many governments also have minimum on-hand capital requirements.

And costs are relative. Though it might be more costly to start a business in some countries on paper, affordability also takes into account relative income.

These graphics from BusinessFinancing.co.uk use data from the World Bank’s Doing Business 2020 report to examine the startup cost for a small-to-medium-size LLC in the largest business cities across 190 countries.

The Cost of Starting a Business in Different Countries

From a pure cost perspective, the affordability of starting a business is extremely dependent on where you are located.

Some countries make the cost of business extremely low to encourage more economic activity. Others have high or nearly inaccessible fees to protect existing businesses, or to simply cash in on the entrepreneurial spirit.

CountryCost (2020 USD)% of Monthly Income
Venezuela0-%
Rwanda0-%
Slovenia0-%
Kyrgyzstan80.1
Sudan80.13
Timor Leste100.09
Azerbaijan110.04
Kazakhstan120.02
Ukraine120.06
Egypt130.07
South Africa130.03
Mauritania140.12
Uzbekistan140.13
Chile160.02
United Kingdom170.01
Belarus180.04
Pakistan200.16
Croatia270.03
Sierra Leone290.81
Armenia300.1
Burundi301.77
Iran310.09
Benin320.38
Liberia320.87
Niger320.78
Afghanistan330.86
Georgia330.1
Mongolia370.17
Romania380.05
Botswana400.08
New Zealand430.02
South Korea470.02
Kosovo49-%
Angola540.63
Togo561.29
Indonesia740.3
Bulgaria750.11
Moldova760.24
Mozambique762.09
Russia770.11
Congo (Democratic Republic of the)802.39
Ireland860.02
Lesotho860.89
Mauritius860.1
Lithuania900.07
Tunisia930.42
Belize990.33
Bhutan1000.45
Madagascar1002.72
Laos1050.68
Montenegro1050.16
Denmark1100.02
Serbia1120.24
Trinidad and Tobago1150.1
Malawi1174.72
Morocco1200.52
Zambia1201.28
Cameroon1251.24
Ghana1251.03
Vietnam1280.73
Tajikistan1361.86
China1380.21
India1420.98
Bangladesh1491.11
Ethiopia1503.21
Honduras1520.85
Czech Republic1580.13
Uganda1633.67
Canada1650.05
Argentina1670.21
Eritrea1744.63
Kiribati1740.7
Estonia1760.11
Sri Lanka1760.56
Turkey1770.28
Myanmar1791.73
Nepal1862.43
Jamaica1890.48
Thailand2010.43
North Macedonia2020.52
Algeria2030.79
Comoros2041.9
Greece2040.14
Slovakia2090.17
Brazil2180.35
Nigeria2231.68
Bahrain2310.14
Micronesia, Federated States of2310.82
Paraguay2320.61
Dominican Republic2330.39
Singapore2380.06
Taiwan239-%
Sweden2590.07
Tonga2620.78
Portugal2680.17
Latvia2870.25
Samoa2961
France3180.11
Tanzania3224.55
The Gambia3266.71
Libya3280.59
Guinea-Bissau3325.72
Senegal3433.35
Kenya3533.01
Peru3550.77
Costa Rica3630.4
Colombia3640.85
Brunei3660.18
Hungary3690.34
South Sudan3735.31
Palau375-%
Australia3770.1
Guinea3806.42
Poland3870.36
Philippines3891.44
Swaziland (Eswatini)4251.59
Guyana4361.29
Namibia4461.15
Papua New Guinea4592.71
Vanuatu4842.04
Mali4938.02
Oman5020.65
Hong Kong5121.2
Germany5240.16
Central African Republic52914.55
Malaysia5670.83
Zimbabwe5765.01
Chad59113.58
Albania5971.71
Marshall Islands610-%
Malta620-%
Japan6410.24
Fiji7051.65
United States of America7250.16
Panama7300.66
Spain7360.34
Cambodia7467.55
Finland7970.23
Yemen80810.7
Kuwait8140.31
Guatemala8192.63
Bosnia and Herzegovina8331.93
Seychelles8420.75
Jordan8602.67
Somalia900-%
Haiti94114.03
Gabon9472.18
Nicaragua9486.6
El Salvador9753.53
Dominica10732.31
Iceland10890.23
Barbados11590.92
Congo (Republic of the)122925.46
Israel12410.41
Saudi Arabia12670.81
Antigua and Barbuda1271-%
Bolivia12935.67
Luxembourg13430.27
Uruguay13441.13
Syria139210.41
Grenada1410-%
Mexico14502.34
Switzerland14630.27
Norway14820.27
Iraq15734.34
Cyprus15760.72
Liechtenstein1619-%
Ecuador16304.23
Bahamas18100.89
Netherlands21900.59
Equatorial Guinea23227.18
Belgium24020.74
Austria24750.71
Lebanon28555.35
Suriname303011.14
Qatar39520.92
San Marino4672-%
Italy48762.02
United Arab Emirates74442.23

At a glance, the cheapest regions for starting a business include Central Asia and Africa.

But the cheapest countries on the dollar for a new startup are Venezuela, Rwanda, and Slovenia. While the former does have fees that only total $0.21, both Rwanda and Slovenia have no fees for new businesses, though Slovenia does have a capital requirement of €7,500.

Expensive countries for new businesses are also spread across the world. There are some in Europe, including Italy at $4,876 and Austria at $2,475, as well as the Americas, including Suriname at $3,030 and Ecuador at $1,630.

The most expensive countries, however, are largely in the Middle East. They include #1 UAE at $7,444, #4 Qatar at $3,952, and #6 Lebanon at $2,855.

Which Country is the Most Affordable for Starting a Business?

Just as costs vary by country, so too does relative affordability.

Though some countries are cheaper than others for starting a business on the dollar, the picture changes when accounting for monthly income. When it comes to the cost of starting a business relative to monthly income, many developed countries take the cake.

Not including countries with missing data, the most affordable countries for starting a business include the UK, Denmark, and Ireland in Europe, South Korea in East Asia, and New Zealand in Oceania. Startup costs in each range from just 1%-2% of monthly income.

The picture is similar in the Americas, where Chile and Canada have the lowest relative fees at 2% and 5% of monthly income respectively. Even the U.S.—which has a decently high cost of $725 for starting a business—is relatively affordable at 16% of monthly income.

Some of the least affordable countries lie in the Middle-East and Central America. Haiti and Suriname have startup costs that are 1,403% and 1,114% of monthly income, while Yemen has affordability rates of 1,070%.

But the least affordable countries are in Africa. Many countries on the continent have startup costs that are more than 100% of monthly income, but the Republic of the Congo and the Central African Republic have affordability rates of 2,546% and 1,455% of monthly income, respectively.

Where is the best place to start a business? It can depend on the barrier to entry. But the biggest barrier takes time and ingenuity: finding the right idea at the right time.

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Misc

12 Ways to Get Smarter in One Infographic

Highlighting and breaking down the 12 most useful and universal mental models that will make you smarter and more productive.

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12 Ways to Get Smarter in One Infographic

View the high resolution version of today’s graphic by clicking here.

The level of a person’s raw intelligence, as measured by aptitude tests such as IQ scores, is generally stable for most people during the course of their adulthood.

While it’s true that there are things you can do to fine tune your natural capabilities, such as doing brain exercises, solving puzzles, and getting optimal sleep—the amount of raw brainpower you have is difficult to increase in any meaningful or permanent way.

For those of us who constantly strive to be high-performers in our fields, this seems like bad news. If we can’t increase our processing power, then how can we solve life’s bigger problems as we move up the ladder?

The Key: Mental Models

The good news is that while raw cognitive abilities matter, it’s how you use and harness those abilities that really makes the difference.

The world’s most successful people, from Ray Dalio to Warren Buffett, are not necessarily leagues above the rest of us in raw intelligence—instead, they simply develop and learn to apply better mental models of how the world works, and they use these principles to filter their thoughts, decisions, strategies, and execution.

This infographic comes from best-selling author and entrepreneur Michael Simmons, who has collected over 650 mental models through his work. The infographic, in a similar style to one we previously published on cognitive biases, synthesizes these models down to the most useful and universal mental models that people should learn to master first.

Concepts such as the 80/20 rule (Pareto’s principle), compound interest, and network building are summarized in the visualization, and their major components are broken down further within the circle.

Mental Model Examples

Example #1: Pareto’s Principle (80/20 Rule for Prioritization)

In a recent Medium post by Simmons, he highlights a well-known mental model that is the perfect bread crumb to start with.

The 80/20 rule (Pareto’s principle) is named after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who was likely the first person to note the 80/20 connection in an 1896 paper.

In short, it shows that 20% of inputs (work, time, effort) often leads to 80% of outputs (performance, sales, revenue, etc.), creating an extremely vivid mental framework for making prioritization decisions.

80-20 law Pareto's principle

The 80/20 rule represents a power law distribution that has been empirically shown to exist throughout nature, and it also has huge implications on business.

If you focus your effort on these 20% of tasks first, and get the most out of them, you will be able to drive results much more efficiently than wasting time on the 80% “long-tail” shown below.

Power law distribution

Example #2: Metcalfe’s Law (Network Building)

Metcalfe’s Law is one of network effects, stating that a network’s value is proportional to the square of the number of nodes in the network.

From a mental model perspective, this is a useful way to understand how certain types of technology-driven businesses derive value.

If you have a smart grid that is only connected to one power source, that’s alright—but one connected to many different energy sources and potential consumers is much more useful for everyone on the grid. Each additional node provides value for the rest of the connections.

Metcalfe's Law illustrated

This mental model can be applied outside of strict technology or business terms as well.

For example, if you build a personal network of connections, each additional relationship can provide more value to the other people in your network. It’s the same principle that Harvard or other prestigious universities operate on: the more value a student can get from the alumni network, the higher price they can charge for tuition.

It’s hard to compete with a fully formed network at scale, as they create massive economic moats for the owner. Modern social networks and messaging apps like Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, TikTok, WhatsApp, and Snapchat all operate with this in mind.

The Power of Mental Models

These are just two examples of how powerful mental models can be effective in making you think clearer and work smarter.

If you want to be a top performer, it’s worth looking into other mental models out there as well. They can help you better frame reality, so that you can harness your intelligence and effort in the most effective way possible—and it’ll allow you to deliver results along the way.

This post was first published in 2018. We have since updated it, adding in new content for 2021.

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