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The World’s 7.5 Billion People, in One Chart

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The World's 7.5 Billion People, in One Chart

Which countries do people live in, globally?

It’s a very simple question, but it’s also hard to get an accurate sense of the answer by browsing through a lengthy table of country-level population data.

That’s because there are close to 200 countries spread around the globe, with populations ranging from near 1.4 billion (China or India) to countries a mere 0.001% of that size. How is it possible to do the mental math in interpreting such a wide range of data points simultaneously?

Visualizing the World’s Population

Today’s data visualization comes to us from PopulationPyramid.net, a fantastic resource for data on global population numbers.

It allows us to see the location of the world’s 7.5 billion people by resizing countries based on their populations and then coloring and organizing them by region.

This simple application of data visualization makes it more intuitive to comprehend where people live around the globe, as well as how different countries compare in size.

Regional Populations

The first thing you might notice on the graphic is the relative size of regions, with Asia taking up a whopping 60% of the visual space.

Here are those numbers by region broken down further:

RankRegionShare of Global Population (%)Population
#1Asia60%4.5 billion
#2Africa16%1.2 billion
#3Europe10%729 million
#4North America7%534 million
#5South America6%424 million
#6Central America1%47 million
#7Oceania1%42 million

When you look at it this way, you can really see how the math breaks down.

About 75% of people reside in Asia or Africa. Meanwhile, the regions of Europe, North America, South America, and Oceania just total together to 25% of the mix.

The 10 Most Populous Countries

There are some countries that are clear standouts on the data visualization.

For example, China and India combine to 2.7 billion people, together accounting for 36% of the total global population.

Those heavyweights aside, there are other notable countries that take up significant amounts of real estate on the visualization as well:

RankCountryPopulation (2017)% of global total
Top 10 Total4,358,978,62958.0%
#1๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ China1,388,232,69318.5%
#2๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ India1,342,512,70617.9%
#3๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ United States326,474,0134.3%
#4๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฉ Indonesia263,510,1463.5%
#5๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ท Brazil211,243,2202.8%
#6๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡ฐ Pakistan196,744,3762.6%
#7๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฌ Nigeria191,835,9362.6%
#8๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฉ Bangladesh164,827,7182.2%
#9๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡บ Russia143,375,0061.9%
#10๐Ÿ‡ฒ๐Ÿ‡ฝ Mexico130,222,8151.7%

The United States, Indonesia, Brazil, and Pakistan rank between #3 and #6, and have about a billion people between them.

Nigeria, which is #7 on the list, has the world’s fastest growing megacity within its borders. Further, Bangladesh is also a noteworthy entry since it is one of the densest populations globally, with 1,138.9 people per square kilometer of land.

A Final Look at Global Population

This isn’t the first time we’ve shown you a data visualization that organizes the global population – here’s one we previously published that shows each country in a bubble chart:

The Population of Every Country is Shown on this Bubble Chart

While this uses slightly older data, it is still interesting to see how data visualization can help us understand a complex and wide-ranging set of data that is relevant to everyday life.

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Demographics

Median Age of the Population in Every Country

How do countries around the world compare in terms of age? This compelling visualization shows the median age for every country in the world.

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The Median Age of the Population in Every Country

View the full-size version of the infographic by clicking here

With a few notable exceptions, the world is rapidly aging.

Today’s infographic, which was shared by Bill Gates on Reddit, shows this incredible explosion in age and how different countries contrast with one another on this demographic metric.

While aging populations in Europe, North America, and Asia stand out on this type of visualization, it’s also important to look at the negative space. In both South America and Africa, populations are still quite young, with Africa getting younger and younger.

Note: The infographic is grouped based on U.N. regional classifications, and lumps Central America, the Caribbean, and South America as one demographic region.

The Oldest Countries

Which countries are the outliers in terms of global demographics?

Let’s start by taking a look at the oldest countries in terms of median age.

RankCountryMedian AgeRegion
#1Japan47 yearsAsia
#2 (t)Germany45 yearsEurope
#2 (t)Italy45 yearsEurope
#4 (t)Greece44 yearsEurope
#4 (t)Bulgaria44 yearsEurope
#4 (t)Portugal44 yearsEurope

Japan takes the cake for the oldest population and it’s joined by a host of European nations.

The following countries tied for the #7 spot, which is just off of the above list: Austria, Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovenia, Spain, and Bermuda. All of these places had median ages of 43 years, with Bermuda being the only non-European state of this group.

It’s worth noting that some smaller countries appear to be excluded from Gates’ infographic. As we showed on our last chart covering the subject of median age, which uses a different data set, the small city-state of Monaco (which has a population of just 39,000 people) actually has the highest median age in the world at 53.1 years.

The Youngest Countries

Now, let’s take a peek at the world’s youngest countries in terms of median age.

RankCountryMedian AgeRegion
#1 (t)Chad14 yearsAfrica
#1 (t)Niger14 yearsAfrica
#3 (t)Afghanistan16 yearsMiddle East
#3 (t)Angola16 yearsAfrica
#3 (t)Burkina Faso16 yearsAfrica
#3 (t)Mali16 yearsAfrica
#3 (t)Somalia16 yearsAfrica
#3 (t)South Sudan16 yearsAfrica
#3 (t)Uganda16 yearsAfrica

The youngest countries globally are Chad and Niger with a median population age of 14 years. Both are located in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The only non-African country is war-torn Afghanistan, where the median age is 16 years.

A variety of countries tied with a median age of 17 years old, which puts them just off of the above list. Those countries include: Benin, Burundi, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, Zambia, Yemen, and Timor-Leste.

More Context on Aging

Want to get an even better idea of what the world looks like as it ages?

To get a sense of change over the coming decades, it’s worth taking a look at this animation that shows median age projections with a focus on Western countries all the way until the year 2060.

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Demographics

Mapping the Global Migration of Millionaires

Which countries are magnets for the world’s rich, and which countries are seeing a wealth exodus? Mapping the migration of the world’s millionaires.

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The world’s wealthiest people are also the most mobile.

High net worth individuals (HNWIs) โ€“ persons with wealth over US$1 million โ€“ may decide to pick up and move for a number of reasons. In some cases they are attracted by jurisdictions with more favorable tax laws, or less pollution and crime. Sometimes, they’re simply looking for a change of scenery.

Today’s graphic, using data from the annual Global Wealth Migration Review, maps the migration of the world’s millionaires, and clearly shows which countries are magnets for the world’s rich, and which countries are seeing a wealth exodus.

The Flight of the Millionaires

It’s no secret that China has been a wealth creation machine over the past two decades. Although the country is still making a number of its citizens very wealthy, over 15,000 Chinese HNWIs still chose to migrate to other countries in 2018 โ€“ the most significant migration of any country.

Here’s a look at the top countries by HNWI outflows:

CountryNet Outflow of NHWIs (2018)% of HNWIs lost
๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ China15,0002%
๐Ÿ‡ท๐Ÿ‡บ Russia7,0006%
๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ณ India5,0002%
๐Ÿ‡น๐Ÿ‡ท Turkey4,00010%
๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท France3,0001%
๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง United Kingdom3,0000%
๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ท Brazil2,0001%
๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฆ Saudi Arabia1,0002%
๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฉ Indonesia1,0002%

Figures rounded to nearest 1000.

Unlike the middle class, wealthy citizens have the means to pick up and leave when things start to sideways in their home country. An uptick in HNWI migration from a country can often be a signal of negative economic or societal factors influencing a country.

This is the case in Turkey, which has been rocked by instability, mass protests, and an inflation rate estimated to be in the triple-digits by some sources.

For the third straight year, Turkey lost more than 4,000 millionaires. An estimated 10% of Turkey’s HNWIs fled in 2018, which is concerning because unlike China and India, the country is not producing new millionaires in any significant number.

Millionaire Magnets

Time-honored locations โ€“ such as Switzerland and the Cayman Islands โ€“ continue to attract the world’s wealthy, but no country is experiencing HNWI inflows quite like Australia.

The Land Down Under has a number of attributes that make it an attractive destination for migrating millionaires. The country has a robust economy, and is perceived as being a safe place to raise a family. Even better, Australia has no inheritance tax and a lower cost of health care, which can make it an attractive alternative to the U.S.

In 2018, Australia jumped ahead of both Canada and France to become the seventh largest wealth market in the world.

Here’s a look at HNWI inflows around the world:

CountryNet Inflow of HNWIs (2018)% of HNWI Gained
๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ Australia12,0003%
๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ United States10,0000%
๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ Canada4,0001%
๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ญ Switzerland3,0001%
๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡ช United Arab Emerates2,0002%
๐Ÿ‡ง๐Ÿ‡ฒ Caribbean*2,0003%
๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฟ New Zealand1,0001%
๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฌ Singapore1,0000%
๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ฑ Israel1,0001%
๐Ÿ‡ต๐Ÿ‡น Portugal1,0002%
๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ท Greece1,0002%
๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ธ Spain1,0001%

Figures rounded to nearest 1000. *Bermuda, Cayman Islands, Virgin Islands, St Barts, Antigua, St Kitts & Nevis, etc

Greece, which was one of the worst performing wealth markets of the last decade, is finally seeing a modest inflow of millionaires again.

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