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Visualizing All Electric Car Models Available in the U.S.

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Graphic showcasing all electric car models available in the U.S.

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Visualizing All Electric Car Models Available in the U.S.

America’s electric vehicle (EV) market has surged over the last decade, and it’s only expected to grow further. The Biden administration has allocated billions towards the EV transition in the hopes that by 2030, electric cars make up 50% of all new cars sales in America.

Given the rising demand, what types of electric car models are available for U.S. consumers to choose from today?

This graphic, using data from Car and Driver and EPA, highlights every single EV that’s available for sale across America, showing the wide range of manufacturers, vehicle types, and prices.

What Electric Vehicles Are Available in America?

As of February 2022, there are 28 different electric vehicles available in the U.S., from 18 different manufacturers. Here are their base model statistics:

EV
Model (2022)
Price (MSRP)Max. HorsepowerCombined Fuel EconomyCombined Max. Range
GMC Hummer EV Pickup$110,2951,000N/AN/A
Audi e-tron GT$102,40046982 MPGe238 miles
Mercedes EQS$102,31032997 MPGe350 miles
Tesla Model X$98,940670102 MPGe348 miles
Tesla Model S$94,990670120 MPGe405 miles
Porsche Taycan$82,70032179 MPGe200 miles
Lucid Air Pure$77,400480N/A406 miles
Rivian R1S$72,500600+N/A260+ miles
Jaguar I-Pace*$69,90039476 MPGe234 miles
Rivian R1T$67,500600+70 MPGe260+ miles
Audi e-tron$65,90040278 MPGe222 miles
Volvo C40 Recharge$58,75040287 MPGe226 miles
Volvo XC40 Recharge$55,30040285 MPGe223 miles
Tesla Model Y Long Range$53,940480122 MPGe330 miles
Polestar 2$45,900231107 MPGe270 miles
Tesla Model 3$44,990283132 MPGe272 miles
Audi Q4 e-tron$43,90029595 MPGe241 miles
Ford Mustang Mach-E RWD$43,895266103 MPGe247 miles
Hyundai Ioniq 5$43,650168110 MPGe220 miles
Kia EV6$40,900167117 MPGe232 miles
Volkswagen ID.4*$40,76020199 MPGe260 miles
Kia Niro EV$39,990201112 MPGe239 miles
Hyundai Kona Electric$34,000201120 MPGe258 miles
Chevrolet Bolt EUV$33,500200115 MPGe247 miles
Mazda MX-30$33,47014392 MPGe100 miles
Chevrolet Bolt EV$31,500200120 MPGe259 miles
Mini Cooper SE$29,900181110 MPGe114 miles
Nissan Leaf$27,400147111 MPGe149 miles

As of February 2022. *Indicates EPA data on fuel economy and range was only available for 2021 models.

At less than $30,000, the Nissan Leaf and Mini Cooper SE are currently the most affordable options for Americans.

Released in 2010, the Nissan Leaf is one of the oldest EVs on the market. Widely considered a pioneer in the EV space, it’s one of the top-selling electric cars in the U.S.—in 2021, more than 14,000 cars were sold in America.

While the Leaf’s low price point may be appealing to many, it has the third shortest maximum range on the list at 149 miles before needing a recharge. The only other cars with shorter ranges were the Mini Cooper SE and the Mazda MX-30.

GMC’s Hummer EV pickup is the most expensive EV on the list, with a base price point of $110,295—however, GMC is planning to release less expensive versions of the Hummer EV over the coming years.

The only other EV pickup available in the U.S. market in early 2022 is Rivian’s R1T. However, more manufacturers like Ford and Chevrolet are planning to release their own EV pickups, and Tesla’s Cybertruck has been in the works for years.

And new EVs are quickly entering the market. For example, BMW’s all-electric i4 and iX have only recently become available for sale in the U.S.

The Top EV Manufacturers

There are a number of domestic and international manufacturers that sell EVs in America, including German manufacturer Audi, Swedish carmaker Volvo, and South Korean manufacturer Kia.

Here’s a breakdown of the 18 different manufacturers on the list, six of which are U.S. based:

ManufacturerCountry of HQ# EVs sold in the U.S.
Tesla🇺🇸 U.S.4
Audi🇩🇪 Germany3
Volvo🇸🇪 Sweden2
Rivian🇺🇸 U.S.2
Kia🇰🇷 South Korea2
Hyundai🇰🇷 South Korea2
Chevrolet🇺🇸 U.S.2
Volkswagen🇩🇪 Germany1
Porsche🇩🇪 Germany1
Polestar🇸🇪 Sweden1
Nissan🇯🇵 Japan1
Mini Cooper🇩🇪 German1
Mercedes🇩🇪 German1
Mazda🇯🇵 Japan1
Lucid🇺🇸 U.S.1
Jaguar🇬🇧 UK1
GMC🇺🇸 U.S.1
Ford🇺🇸 U.S.1

Tesla has the highest number of EV models on the market, with four different vehicles available: the Model S, Model X, Model Y, and the Model 3. It’s one of the few manufacturers on the list that exclusively makes electric cars—the only others being Rivian and Lucid.

While anticipation has been building around Tesla’s Cybertruck, and murmurs of a cheaper Tesla have been circulating, Tesla’ CEO Elon Musk has confirmed that there will be no new Tesla models released in 2022. The company will instead focus on its existing models for the time being.

Are U.S. Consumers Ready to Transition to Electric Cars?

It’s important to note that, while EV adoption in America has increased over the years, the U.S. is still lagging behind other countries. Between 2015 and 2020, America’s EV fleet grew at an annual rate of 28%, while China’s grew by 51%, and Europe increased by 41%.

Why are so many Americans dragging their feet when it comes to electric cars? According to a survey by Pew Research Center, the cost is a big barrier, as well as concerns over their reliability compared to gas vehicles.

But with gas prices at all-time highs, and as consumers grow increasingly concerned over the carbon costs of gas vehicles, switching to an electric car may soon be too hard to resist.

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40 Years of U.S. Wildfires, in One Chart

Wildfires are blazing across the U.S with unprecedented intensity. Here is how activity has evolved over four decades.

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The following content is sponsored by Carbon Streaming

Note: This infographic contains forward looking information based on current expectations and beliefs of Carbon Streaming Corporation. For further information about the risks, uncertainties and assumptions related to such forward looking information, please see their legal notice.

40 Years of U.S. Wildfires, in One Chart

Wildfires are becoming more intense and widespread—largely due to rising temperatures caused by climate change. 

What’s more, experts predict a whopping 50% surge in wildfires by 2100.

We partnered with Carbon Streaming to illustrate four decades (1983–2023) of wildfire activity in the U.S. Let’s dive in.

The Evolution of Wildfires Over Time

The data we used comes from the National Interagency Fire Center and highlights the number of wildfires that occurred between 1983 and 2023, along with the average acres burned over the same time period. The 5-year rolling average was calculated based on the current year plus the preceding four years.

As the table below shows, the total area burned across the U.S. in 2023 was significantly below average, and the number of wildfires was slightly below average due in part to cooler weather conditions.

YearNumber of WildfiresAcres Burned 5-Year Rolling Average
202356,5802,693,9106,436,687
202268,9887,577,1837,651,404
202158,9857,125,6438,141,184
202058,95010,122,3367,818,055
201950,4774,664,3647,818,617
201858,0838,767,4927,604,867
201771,49910,026,0866,715,278
201667,7435,509,9956,575,308
201568,15110,125,1497,215,583
201463,3123,595,6135,875,098
201347,5794,319,5466,340,332
201267,7749,326,2386,534,917
201174,1268,711,3676,535,278
201071,9713,422,7246,767,754
200978,7925,921,7867,821,087
200878,9795,292,4688,256,305
200785,7059,328,0457,989,980
200696,3859,873,7457,561,314
200566,7538,689,3896,300,747
200465,4618,097,880*6,041,568
200363,6293,960,8425,547,210
200273,4577,184,7125,020,983
200184,0793,570,9114,155,432
200092,2507,393,4934,654,449
199992,4875,626,0933,543,860
199881,0431,329,7043,233,357
199766,1962,856,9593,326,931
199696,3636,065,9983,169,525
199582,2341,840,5462,547,041
199479,1074,073,5793,103,256
199358,8101,797,5742,654,002
199287,3942,069,9293,296,346
199175,7542,953,5783,371,819
199066,4814,621,6213,324,936
198948,9491,827,3102,979,841
198872,7505,009,2902,844,061
198771,3002,447,2962,106,936
198685,9072,719,162N/A
198582,5912,896,147N/A
198420,4931,148,409N/A
198318,2291,323,666N/A

*2004 fires and acres do not include state lands for North Carolina

What’s the impact of the increasing burned areas and severity of wildfires over time? 

Simply put, when wildfires burn, they release smoke and gas into the air which makes the Earth warmer, making it easier for more wildfires to start and spread. This cycle is often referred to as the fires and climate feedback loop, and is the reason why experts believe that wildfires will only continue to worsen.

Wildfire Havoc in the West

2023 marked a year of severe wildfire destruction on the West Coast and in Hawaii. The Maui wildfires in August, for example, led to the destruction of 2,308 structures and at time of writing, 5,000 residents are still displaced six months later. Additionally, the cost of rebuilding Maui could exceed $5 billion and take several years.

Post-wildfire restoration is a critical piece of climate change mitigation, particularly in the states that need it the most. 

What Can Be Done?

In partnership with Mast Reforestation, Carbon Streaming is advancing its pipeline of post-wildfire reforestation projects in Western U.S. states. 

To date, Carbon Streaming has entered into carbon credit streams to provide funding for three reforestation projects—Sheep Creek in Montana and Feather River and Baccala Ranch in California.

Mast Reforestation’s unique approach combines proven reforestation practices with new technology to regrow resilient, climate-adapted forests. Want to know more?

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