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Visualizing the Green Investments of Sovereign Wealth Funds

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See this visualization first on the Voronoi app.

Green Investments of Sovereign Wealth Funds

Visualizing the Green Investments of Sovereign Wealth Funds

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

With $11.2 trillion in assets, sovereign wealth funds are increasingly looking to sustainable investments as the energy transition gains greater traction.

Sovereign wealth funds are government-run pools of capital typically derived from surplus reserves or revenues from commodity exports. While investment in green assets have risen significantly in recent years, they still make up a small share of overall fund assets, covering less than 1% of the total.

This graphic compares the investment in green and black assets across sovereign wealth funds, based on data from Global SWF.

Green Assets Outpace Black Assets

In 2023, sovereign wealth funds held $26 billion in green investments—surpassing black investments by more than double.

While green assets include investments in renewable energy and electric vehicles, black assets are seen across fossil fuels and finite resources. Below, we show the growth in green investments in these funds since 2018:

YearBlack Assets
Value of Investments
Black Assets
# of Investments
Green Assets
Value of Investments
Green Assets
# of Investments
2023$12B15$26B91
2022$7B11$19B51
2021$7B8$24B47
2020$15B17$8B21
2019$14B19$6B20
2018$16B16$6B20

Nearly half of green assets were held by Gulf funds who are channeling energy revenues into sustainable investments.

For instance, a major UAE fund has stakes in India-based Tata Power Renewables, an offshore wind company based in Germany, and a U.S residential solar firm. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia’s fund has a 44% stake in the utility firm ACWA Power which is working to increase its hydrogen capacity.

Along with this, Singapore’s fund is making key investments in sustainable assets. In 2022, it created a $5 billion investment arm focused on decarbonizing the global economy.

The government of New Zealand, which runs another leading fund investing in renewables, partnered with BlackRock in 2023 to launch a $1.2 billion fund focused on climate infrastructure. The fund is intended to accelerate the country’s decarbonization efforts as it aims to become among the first countries to have renewables powering 100% of its electricity system.

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U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

U.S. debt interest payments have surged past the $1 trillion dollar mark, amid high interest rates and an ever-expanding debt burden.

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This line chart shows U.S. debt interest payments over modern history.

U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The cost of paying for America’s national debt crossed the $1 trillion dollar mark in 2023, driven by high interest rates and a record $34 trillion mountain of debt.

Over the last decade, U.S. debt interest payments have more than doubled amid vast government spending during the pandemic crisis. As debt payments continue to soar, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reported that debt servicing costs surpassed defense spending for the first time ever this year.

This graphic shows the sharp rise in U.S. debt payments, based on data from the Federal Reserve.

A $1 Trillion Interest Bill, and Growing

Below, we show how U.S. debt interest payments have risen at a faster pace than at another time in modern history:

DateInterest PaymentsU.S. National Debt
2023$1.0T$34.0T
2022$830B$31.4T
2021$612B$29.6T
2020$518B$27.7T
2019$564B$23.2T
2018$571B$22.0T
2017$493B$20.5T
2016$460B$20.0T
2015$435B$18.9T
2014$442B$18.1T
2013$425B$17.2T
2012$417B$16.4T
2011$433B$15.2T
2010$400B$14.0T
2009$354B$12.3T
2008$380B$10.7T
2007$414B$9.2T
2006$387B$8.7T
2005$355B$8.2T
2004$318B$7.6T
2003$294B$7.0T
2002$298B$6.4T
2001$318B$5.9T
2000$353B$5.7T
1999$353B$5.8T
1998$360B$5.6T
1997$368B$5.5T
1996$362B$5.3T
1995$357B$5.0T
1994$334B$4.8T
1993$311B$4.5T
1992$306B$4.2T
1991$308B$3.8T
1990$298B$3.4T
1989$275B$3.0T
1988$254B$2.7T
1987$240B$2.4T
1986$225B$2.2T
1985$219B$1.9T
1984$205B$1.7T
1983$176B$1.4T
1982$157B$1.2T
1981$142B$1.0T
1980$113B$930.2B
1979$96B$845.1B
1978$84B$789.2B
1977$69B$718.9B
1976$61B$653.5B
1975$55B$576.6B
1974$50B$492.7B
1973$45B$469.1B
1972$39B$448.5B
1971$36B$424.1B
1970$35B$389.2B
1969$30B$368.2B
1968$25B$358.0B
1967$23B$344.7B
1966$21B$329.3B

Interest payments represent seasonally adjusted annual rate at the end of Q4.

At current rates, the U.S. national debt is growing by a remarkable $1 trillion about every 100 days, equal to roughly $3.6 trillion per year.

As the national debt has ballooned, debt payments even exceeded Medicaid outlays in 2023—one of the government’s largest expenditures. On average, the U.S. spent more than $2 billion per day on interest costs last year. Going further, the U.S. government is projected to spend a historic $12.4 trillion on interest payments over the next decade, averaging about $37,100 per American.

Exacerbating matters is that the U.S. is running a steep deficit, which stood at $1.1 trillion for the first six months of fiscal 2024. This has accelerated due to the 43% increase in debt servicing costs along with a $31 billion dollar increase in defense spending from a year earlier. Additionally, a $30 billion increase in funding for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in light of the regional banking crisis last year was a major contributor to the deficit increase.

Overall, the CBO forecasts that roughly 75% of the federal deficit’s increase will be due to interest costs by 2034.

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