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Charted: America’s Import Reliance of Key Minerals

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Bar chart of U.S. import reliance of critical minerals and primary import source (country)

Charted: America’s Import Reliance of Key Minerals

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The push towards a more sustainable future requires various key minerals to build the infrastructure of the green economy. However, the U.S. is heavily reliant on nonfuel mineral imports causing potential vulnerabilities in the nation’s supply chains.

Specifically, the U.S. is 100% reliant on imports for at least 12 key minerals deemed critical by the government, with China being the primary import source for many of these along with many other critical minerals.

This graphic uses data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to visualize America’s import dependence for 30 different key nonfuel minerals along with the nation that the U.S. primarily imports each mineral from.

U.S. Import Reliance, by Mineral

While the U.S. mines and processes a significant amount of minerals domestically, in 2022 imports still accounted for more than half of the country’s consumption of 51 nonfuel minerals. The USGS calculates a net import reliance as a percentage of apparent consumption, showing how much of U.S. demand for each mineral is met through imports.

Of the most important minerals deemed by the USGS, the U.S. was 95% or more reliant on imports for 13 different minerals, with China being the primary import source for more than half of these.

MineralNet Import Reliance as Percentage of ConsumptionPrimary Import Source (2018-2021)
Arsenic100%🇨🇳 China
Fluorspar100%🇲🇽 Mexico
Gallium100%🇨🇳 China
Graphite (natural)100%🇨🇳 China
Indium100%🇰🇷 Republic of Korea
Manganese100%🇬🇦 Gabon
Niobium100%🇧🇷 Brazil
Scandium100%🇪🇺 Europe
Tantalum100%🇨🇳 China
Yttrium100%🇨🇳 China
Bismuth96%🇨🇳 China
Rare Earths (compounds and metals)95%🇨🇳 China
Titanium (metal)95%🇯🇵 Japan
Antimony83%🇨🇳 China
Chromium83%🇿🇦 South Africa
Tin77%🇵🇪 Peru
Cobalt76%🇳🇴 Norway
Zinc76%🇨🇦 Canada
Aluminum (bauxite)75%🇯🇲 Jamaica
Barite75%🇨🇳 China
Tellerium75%🇨🇦 Canada
Platinum66%🇿🇦 South Africa
Nickel56%🇨🇦 Canada
Vanadium54%🇨🇦 Canada
Germanium50%🇨🇳 China
Magnesium50%🇮🇱 Israel
Tungsten50%🇨🇳 China
Zirconium50%🇿🇦 South Africa
Palladium26%🇷🇺 Russia
Lithium25%🇦🇷 Argentina

These include rare earths (a group of 17 nearly indistinguishable heavy metals with similar properties) which are essential in technology, high-powered magnets, electronics, and industry, along with natural graphite which is found in lithium-ion batteries.

These are all on the U.S. government’s critical mineral list which has a total of 50 minerals, and the U.S. is 50% or more import reliant for 43 of these minerals.

Some other minerals on the official list which the U.S. is 100% reliant on imports for are arsenic, fluorspar, indium, manganese, niobium, and tantalum, which are used in a variety of applications like the production of alloys and semiconductors along with the manufacturing of electronic components like LCD screens and capacitors.

China’s Gallium and Germanium Restrictions

America’s dependence on imports for various minerals has resulted in a new challenge resulting from China’s announced export restrictions on gallium and germanium that took effect August 1st, 2023. The U.S. is 100% import dependent for gallium and 50% import dependent for germanium.

These restrictions are seen as a retaliation against U.S. and EU sanctions on China which have restricted the export of chips and chipmaking equipment.

Both gallium and germanium are used in the production of transistors and semiconductors along with solar panels and cells, and these export restrictions present an additional hurdle for critical U.S. supply chains of various technologies that include LED lights and fiber-optic systems used for high-speed data transmission.

The restrictions also affect the European Union, which imports 71% of its gallium and 45% of its germanium from China. It’s another stark reminder to the world of China’s dominance in the production and processing of many key minerals.

The announcement of these restrictions has only highlighted the importance for the U.S. and other nations to reduce import dependence and diversify supply chains of key minerals and technologies.

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Economy

Where U.S. Inflation Hit the Hardest in March 2024

We visualized product categories that saw the highest % increase in price due to U.S. inflation as of March 2024.

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Where U.S. Inflation Hit the Hardest (March 2024)

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The latest U.S. inflation figures were released in early April, revealing that the consumer price index (CPI) had risen by 3.5% in March 2024, on an annual basis. This is unfortunately higher than the 3.2% logged in February, showing once again how stubborn inflation has been post-pandemic.

To add context to these figures, we’ve visualized CPI categories that became significantly more expensive from March 2023 to March 2024. All figures come from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which regularly posts CPI figures.

Data and Highlights

The data we used to create this graphic is listed in the table below.

ItemYoY Change (%)
📀 Video discs + other media30.1
🥤 Juice + drinks27.5
🚗 Motor vehicle insurance22.2
🔧 Repair of household items18
🏠 Home care of invalids + elderly14.2
🚗 Motor vehicle repair11.6
🥩 Beef roasts11.2
👶 Baby food + formula9.9
🐾 Veterinarian services9.6
⚖️ Legal services8.8
🏥 Outpatient hospital services8.3
📊 All items average3.5

Prices of “video discs and other media” rose by a substantial 30.1% year-over-year as of March 2024, highlighting rising demand for physical media such as vinyl records.

According to an article from The Guardian, U.S. vinyl sales rose 21.7% in the first half of 2023, driven by artists like Taylor Swift, Lana Del Rey, and Fleetwood Mac. Swift’s latest album, Midnights, sold nearly 500,000 vinyl copies throughout the entire year.

Another category that rose significantly was “juice and drinks”, at 27.5%. This rise in cost has been attributed to numerous factors including sugar shortages, increased transportation costs, and diseases affecting orange trees in Florida.

See more graphics on inflation

If you enjoyed this post, check out this graphic on inflation rates across the G20. For each country, we compared inflation rates in February 2024 to their COVID-19 peak.

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