Ranked: The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2022
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The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2022

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Infographic showing the most valuable brands in 2022

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The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2022

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Given the elusive nature of brands, determining a brand’s financial value is a difficult task.

Despite a brand’s intangibility, it’s hard to deny just how effective a strong one can be at boosting a company’s bottom line.

With this in mind, Brand Finance takes on the challenge of identifying the world’s most valuable brands in the world in its annual Global 500 Report. The graphic above, using data from the latest edition of the report, highlights the top 100 most valuable brands in 2022.

Editor’s note: This ranking measures the value of brands, which can be thought of as marketing-related intangible assets that create a brand identity and reputation in the minds of consumers. It attempts to measure this in financial terms, calculating what the brand is worth to the company that owns it. For more information on methodology, calculations, and sourcing, go to the bottom of this article.

A Full Breakdown of the Most Valuable Brands

With an increase of 35% since last year’s report, Apple retains its top spot on the ranking as the world’s most valuable brand, with a total brand value of $335.1 billion.

This is the highest brand value ever recorded in the history of the Global 500 report, which has been published each year since 2007.

As one of the world’s largest tech companies, Apple dominates the smartphone market, especially in the U.S., where more than 50% of operating smartphones are now an iPhone.

Here’s a complete list of the 100 most valuable brands according to the report:

RankBrand2022 Brand Value ($B)CountrySector
1Apple$355.1United StatesTech & Services
2Amazon$350.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
3Google$263.4United StatesMedia & Telecoms
4Microsoft$184.2United StatesTech & Services
5Walmart$111.9United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
6Samsung Group$107.3South KoreaTech & Services
7Facebook$101.2United StatesMedia & Telecoms
8ICBC$75.1ChinaBanking & Insurance
9Huawei$71.2ChinaTech & Services
10Verizon$69.6United StatesMedia & Telecoms
11China Construction Bank$65.5ChinaBanking & Insurance
12Toyota$64.3JapanAutomobiles
13WeChat$62.3ChinaMedia & Telecoms
14Agricultural Bank Of China$62.0ChinaBanking & Insurance
15Mercedes-Benz$60.8GermanyAutomobiles
16State Grid$60.2ChinaEnergy & Utilities
17Deutsche Telekom$60.2GermanyMedia & Telecoms
18TikTok/Douyin$59.0ChinaMedia & Telecoms
19Disney$57.1United StatesMedia & Telecoms
20Home Depot$56.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
21Ping An$54.4ChinaBanking & Insurance
22Taobao$53.8ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
23Shell$49.9United KingdomEnergy & Utilities
24Bank of China$49.6ChinaBanking & Insurance
25Tmall$49.2ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
26AT&T$47.0United StatesMedia & Telecoms
27Tencent$46.7ChinaMedia & Telecoms
28Tesla$46.0United StatesAutomobiles
29Starbucks$45.7United StatesFood & Bev
30Allianz Group$45.2GermanyBanking & Insurance
31Aramco$43.6Saudi ArabiaEnergy & Utilities
32Moutai$42.9ChinaFood & Bev
33Volkswagen$41.0GermanyAutomobiles
34China Mobile$40.9ChinaMedia & Telecoms
35NTT Group$40.7JapanMedia & Telecoms
36McDonald's$39.7United StatesFood & Bev
37Mitsubishi Group$39.2JapanAutomobiles
38UPS$38.5United StatesEnergy & Utilities
39BMW$37.9GermanyAutomobiles
40Costco$37.5United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
41Bank of America$36.7United StatesBanking & Insurance
42Marlboro$36.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
43accenture$36.2United StatesTech & Services
44Coca-Cola$35.4United StatesFood & Bev
45Citi$34.4United StatesBanking & Insurance
46Porsche$33.7GermanyAutomobiles
47Instagram$33.5United StatesMedia & Telecoms
48Lowe's$33.4United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
49Nike$33.2United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
50UnitedHealthcare$32.9United StatesHealthcare
51Xfinity$31.3United StatesMedia & Telecoms
52Chase$30.1United StatesBanking & Insurance
53Wells Fargo$30.1United StatesBanking & Insurance
54Deloitte$29.8United StatesTech & Services
55PetroChina$29.7ChinaEnergy & Utilities
56Netflix$29.4United StatesMedia & Telecoms
57Oracle$29.1United StatesTech & Services
58JP Morgan$28.9United StatesBanking & Insurance
59Wuliangye$28.7ChinaFood & Bev
60Target$28.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
61Honda$28.2JapanAutomobiles
62CSCEC$27.4ChinaEnergy & Utilities
63American Express$27.2United StatesBanking & Insurance
64JD.com$27.2ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
65VISA$27.1United StatesBanking & Insurance
66Cisco$26.6United StatesTech & Services
67CVS$26.2United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
68FedEx$26.0United StatesEnergy & Utilities
69Intel$25.6United StatesTech & Services
70Sinopec$25.2ChinaEnergy & Utilities
71Sumitomo Group$25.1JapanTech & Services
72Hyundai Group$25.0South KoreaAutomobiles
73SK Group$24.4South KoreaMedia & Telecoms
74China Merchants Bank$24.4ChinaBanking & Insurance
75Mitsui$24.3JapanEnergy & Utilities
76Ford$24.2United StatesAutomobiles
77Spectrum$24.1United StatesMedia & Telecoms
78TATA Group$23.9IndiaEnergy & Utilities
79YouTube$23.9United StatesMedia & Telecoms
80China Life$23.9ChinaBanking & Insurance
81Louis Vuitton$23.4FranceRetail & Consumer Goods
82EY$23.2United KingdomTech & Services
83PWC$23.2United StatesTech & Services
84Alibaba.com$22.8ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
85Uber$22.8United StatesTech & Services
86Siemens Group$22.4GermanyEnergy & Utilities
87Dell Technologies$22.2United StatesTech & Services
88Mastercard$21.4United StatesTech & Services
89IBM$21.4United StatesTech & Services
90Nestlé$20.8SwitzerlandFood & Bev
91LG Group$20.8South KoreaTech & Services
92Pepsi$20.7United StatesFood & Bev
93TSMC$20.5TaiwanTech & Services
94Sony$19.8JapanTech & Services
95General Electric$19.7United StatesEnergy & Utilities
96CRCC$19.7ChinaEnergy & Utilities
97Walgreens$19.7United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
98Vodafone$19.5United KingdomMedia & Telecoms
99Aldi$19.2GermanyRetail & Consumer Goods
100RBC$19.0CanadaBanking & Insurance

After Apple, coming in a close second is Amazon with a brand value of $350.3 billion. This is not surprising, considering the tech giant has often found itself neck-and-neck with Apple in the rankings, and has even come in first place in previous editions of the report.

One other brand worth highlighting is TikTok. The social media company saw a 215% increase in its brand value year-over-year, making it the fastest-growing brand on the entire list.

Between 2019 and 2021, the platform saw its userbase skyrocket, growing from 291.4 million to 655.9 million in just two years. If this growth continues, TikTok could reach nearly one billion users by 2025, according to projections from Insider Intelligence.

Most Valuable Sectors

Over a third of the brands on the list fall into the tech and services sector. Combined, this category has a brand value of $2.0 trillion.

SectorBrand Value% of Top 100
Tech & Services$2.0 trillion36.8%
Media & Telecoms$1.0 trillion19.2%
Retail & Consumer Goods$910 billion16.8%
Banking & Insurance$634 billion11.7%
Energy & Utilities$411 billion7.6%
Automobiles$400 billion7.4%
Healthcare$33 billion0.6%

Media is the second most valuable sector—19% of the top 100 brands fall under the media and telecoms sector, including Google, Facebook, and WeChat.

COVID-19 is partly the reason for this, as media consumption increased throughout the global pandemic. For example, in the first nine months of 2021, Snapchat’s daily usage grew by 77%. Despite increased traction with users, it’s worth noting the company is now feeling the sting as the real world competes for attention spans once again and advertisers begin to ghost the app due to recession jitters.

As pandemic restrictions fade out around the world, and murmurs of a global recession threaten global economic growth, next year’s report could see some big shifts in brand value.

The Geography of Valuable Brands

When looking at where these brands are based, we see that the United States and China account for 73 of the top 100 brands on the ranking. Even more surprising—just six countries make up 94% of the list.

The growth of Chinese companies on the global stage is reflected in this visualization. As a point of comparison, a decade ago, only six Chinese companies made Brand Finance’s Top 100 ranking, and none of them were in the top 30 for brand value.

most valuable brands by country

Interestingly, European countries only make up 14% of the list, which is a testament to just how much Europe’s economic dominance has dwindled over the last few decades.

Back in the 1960s, Europe accounted for nearly a third of the world’s total GDP. But by 2017, it had dropped down to 16%. According to a forecast by the Pardee Center of the University of Denver, the EU’s share of global GDP is expected to drop down to 10% by 2100.

Of course, if history has taught us anything, it’s that a lot can change over the span of a century. How a ranking like this will look in coming decades is anyone’s guess.

Where does this data come from?

Source: Brand Finance Global 500 Report

Important note: The values shown above are brand value calculations as opposed to market capitalization. See below for more details.

How is brand value calculated? In simple terms, the methodology for calculating “brand value” is a formula that is as follows:

Brand Strength (BSI) x Brand Royalty Rate x Brand Revenues = Brand Value

Brand Strength Index (BSI) looks at brand investment, brand equity, and brand performance. The brand royalty rate is determined based on sector. Lastly, forecast brand-specific revenues are determined based on the proportion of parent company revenues attributable to the brand in question. Brand value itself is discounted to net present value.

We recommend visiting page 94 and 99 of the report to view the full explanation of the methodology.

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Charted: Tesla’s Unrivaled Profit Margins

This infographic compares Tesla’s impressive profit margins to various Western and Chinese competitors.

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Chart: Tesla’s Unrivaled Profit Margins

In January this year, Tesla made the surprising announcement that it would be cutting prices on its vehicles by as much as 20%.

While price cuts are not new in the automotive world, they are for Tesla. The company, which historically has been unable to keep up with demand, has seen its order backlog shrink from 476,000 units in July 2022, to 74,000 in December 2022.

This has been attributed to Tesla’s robust production growth, which saw 2022 production increase 41% over 2021 (from 930,422 to 1,313,851 units).

With the days of “endless” demand seemingly over, Tesla is going on the offensive by reducing its prices—a move that puts pressure on competitors, but has also angered existing owners.

Cranking up the Heat

Tesla’s price cuts are an attempt to protect its market share, but they’re not exactly the desperation move some media outlets have claimed them to be.

Recent data compiled by Reuters shows that Tesla’s margins are significantly higher than those of its rivals, both in terms of gross and net profit. Our graphic only illustrates the net figures, but gross profits are also included in the table below.

CompanyGross profit per carNet profit per car
🇺🇸 Tesla$15,653$9,574
🇺🇸 GM$3,818$2,150
🇨🇳 BYD$5,456$1,550
🇯🇵 Toyota$3,925$1,197
🇩🇪 VW$6,034$973
🇰🇷 Hyundai$5,362$927
🇺🇸 Ford$3,115-$762
🇨🇳 Xpeng$4,565-$11,735
🇨🇳 Nio$8,036-$19,141

Data from Q3 2022

Price cutting has its drawbacks, but one could argue that the benefits for Tesla are worth it based on this data—especially in a critical market like China.

Tesla has taken the nuclear option to bully the weaker, thin margin players off the table.
– Bill Russo, Automobility

In the case of Chinese EV startups Xpeng and Nio, net profits are non-existent, meaning it’s unlikely they’ll be able to match Tesla’s reductions in price. Both firms have reported year-on-year sales declines in January.

As for Tesla, Chinese media outlets have claimed that the firm received 30,000 orders within three days of its price cut announcement. Note that this hasn’t been officially confirmed by anyone within the company.

Tit for Tat

Ford made headlines recently for announcing its own price cuts on the Mustang Mach-E electric SUV. The model is a direct competitor to Tesla’s best-selling Model Y.

Chevrolet and Hyundai have also adjusted some of their EV prices in recent months, as listed in the following table.

ModelOld PriceNew PriceDiscount
Tesla Model Y Long Range$65,990$53,49018.9%
Chevrolet Bolt EUV 2023$33,500$27,20018.8%
Tesla Model Y Performance$69,990$56,99018.6%
Chevrolet Bolt 2023$31,600$26,50016.1%
Tesla Model 3 Performance$62,990$53,99014.3%
Hyundai Kona Electric 2022$37,390$34,0009.1%
Ford Mustang Mach-E GT Extended Range$69,900$64,0008.4%
Tesla Model 3 Long Range$46,990$43,9906.4%
Ford Mustang Mach-E Premium AWD$57,675$53,9956.4%
Ford Mustang Mach-E RWD Standard Range$46,900$46,0001.9%

Source: Observer (Feb 2023)

Volkswagen is a noteworthy player missing from this table. The company has been gaining ground on Tesla, especially in the European market.

We have a clear pricing strategy and are focusing on reliability. We trust in the strength of our products and brands.
– Oliver Blume, CEO, VW Group

This decision could hamper Volkswagen’s goal of becoming a dominant player in EVs, especially if more automakers join Tesla in cutting prices. For now, Tesla still holds a strong grip on the US market.

tesla US market share

Thanks, Elon

Recent Tesla buyers became outraged when the company announced it would be slashing prices on its cars. In China, buyers even staged protests at Tesla stores and delivery centers.

Recent buyers not only missed out on a better price, but their cars have effectively depreciated by the amount of the cut. This is a bitter turn of events, given Musk’s 2019 claims that a Tesla would be an appreciating asset.

I think the most profound thing is that if you buy a Tesla today, I believe you are buying an appreciating asset – not a depreciating asset.
– Elon Musk, CEO, Tesla

These comments were made in reference to Tesla’s full self-driving (FSD) capabilities, which Elon claimed would enable owners to turn their cars into robotaxis.

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