Ranked: The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2022
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The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2022

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The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2022

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Given the elusive nature of brands, determining a brand’s financial value is a difficult task.

Despite a brand’s intangibility, it’s hard to deny just how effective a strong one can be at boosting a company’s bottom line.

With this in mind, Brand Finance takes on the challenge of identifying the world’s most valuable brands in the world in its annual Global 500 Report. The graphic above, using data from the latest edition of the report, highlights the top 100 most valuable brands in 2022.

Editor’s note: This ranking measures the value of brands, which can be thought of as marketing-related intangible assets that create a brand identity and reputation in the minds of consumers. It attempts to measure this in financial terms, calculating what the brand is worth to the company that owns it. For more information on methodology, calculations, and sourcing, go to the bottom of this article.

A Full Breakdown of the Most Valuable Brands

With an increase of 35% since last year’s report, Apple retains its top spot on the ranking as the world’s most valuable brand, with a total brand value of $335.1 billion.

This is the highest brand value ever recorded in the history of the Global 500 report, which has been published each year since 2007.

As one of the world’s largest tech companies, Apple dominates the smartphone market, especially in the U.S., where more than 50% of operating smartphones are now an iPhone.

Here’s a complete list of the 100 most valuable brands according to the report:

RankBrand2022 Brand Value ($B)CountrySector
1Apple$355.1United StatesTech & Services
2Amazon$350.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
3Google$263.4United StatesMedia & Telecoms
4Microsoft$184.2United StatesTech & Services
5Walmart$111.9United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
6Samsung Group$107.3South KoreaTech & Services
7Facebook$101.2United StatesMedia & Telecoms
8ICBC$75.1ChinaBanking & Insurance
9Huawei$71.2ChinaTech & Services
10Verizon$69.6United StatesMedia & Telecoms
11China Construction Bank$65.5ChinaBanking & Insurance
12Toyota$64.3JapanAutomobiles
13WeChat$62.3ChinaMedia & Telecoms
14Agricultural Bank Of China$62.0ChinaBanking & Insurance
15Mercedes-Benz$60.8GermanyAutomobiles
16State Grid$60.2ChinaEnergy & Utilities
17Deutsche Telekom$60.2GermanyMedia & Telecoms
18TikTok/Douyin$59.0ChinaMedia & Telecoms
19Disney$57.1United StatesMedia & Telecoms
20Home Depot$56.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
21Ping An$54.4ChinaBanking & Insurance
22Taobao$53.8ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
23Shell$49.9United KingdomEnergy & Utilities
24Bank of China$49.6ChinaBanking & Insurance
25Tmall$49.2ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
26AT&T$47.0United StatesMedia & Telecoms
27Tencent$46.7ChinaMedia & Telecoms
28Tesla$46.0United StatesAutomobiles
29Starbucks$45.7United StatesFood & Bev
30Allianz Group$45.2GermanyBanking & Insurance
31Aramco$43.6Saudi ArabiaEnergy & Utilities
32Moutai$42.9ChinaFood & Bev
33Volkswagen$41.0GermanyAutomobiles
34China Mobile$40.9ChinaMedia & Telecoms
35NTT Group$40.7JapanMedia & Telecoms
36McDonald's$39.7United StatesFood & Bev
37Mitsubishi Group$39.2JapanAutomobiles
38UPS$38.5United StatesEnergy & Utilities
39BMW$37.9GermanyAutomobiles
40Costco$37.5United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
41Bank of America$36.7United StatesBanking & Insurance
42Marlboro$36.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
43accenture$36.2United StatesTech & Services
44Coca-Cola$35.4United StatesFood & Bev
45Citi$34.4United StatesBanking & Insurance
46Porsche$33.7GermanyAutomobiles
47Instagram$33.5United StatesMedia & Telecoms
48Lowe's$33.4United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
49Nike$33.2United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
50UnitedHealthcare$32.9United StatesHealthcare
51Xfinity$31.3United StatesMedia & Telecoms
52Chase$30.1United StatesBanking & Insurance
53Wells Fargo$30.1United StatesBanking & Insurance
54Deloitte$29.8United StatesTech & Services
55PetroChina$29.7ChinaEnergy & Utilities
56Netflix$29.4United StatesMedia & Telecoms
57Oracle$29.1United StatesTech & Services
58JP Morgan$28.9United StatesBanking & Insurance
59Wuliangye$28.7ChinaFood & Bev
60Target$28.3United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
61Honda$28.2JapanAutomobiles
62CSCEC$27.4ChinaEnergy & Utilities
63American Express$27.2United StatesBanking & Insurance
64JD.com$27.2ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
65VISA$27.1United StatesBanking & Insurance
66Cisco$26.6United StatesTech & Services
67CVS$26.2United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
68FedEx$26.0United StatesEnergy & Utilities
69Intel$25.6United StatesTech & Services
70Sinopec$25.2ChinaEnergy & Utilities
71Sumitomo Group$25.1JapanTech & Services
72Hyundai Group$25.0South KoreaAutomobiles
73SK Group$24.4South KoreaMedia & Telecoms
74China Merchants Bank$24.4ChinaBanking & Insurance
75Mitsui$24.3JapanEnergy & Utilities
76Ford$24.2United StatesAutomobiles
77Spectrum$24.1United StatesMedia & Telecoms
78TATA Group$23.9IndiaEnergy & Utilities
79YouTube$23.9United StatesMedia & Telecoms
80China Life$23.9ChinaBanking & Insurance
81Louis Vuitton$23.4FranceRetail & Consumer Goods
82EY$23.2United KingdomTech & Services
83PWC$23.2United StatesTech & Services
84Alibaba.com$22.8ChinaRetail & Consumer Goods
85Uber$22.8United StatesTech & Services
86Siemens Group$22.4GermanyEnergy & Utilities
87Dell Technologies$22.2United StatesTech & Services
88Mastercard$21.4United StatesTech & Services
89IBM$21.4United StatesTech & Services
90Nestlé$20.8SwitzerlandFood & Bev
91LG Group$20.8South KoreaTech & Services
92Pepsi$20.7United StatesFood & Bev
93TSMC$20.5TaiwanTech & Services
94Sony$19.8JapanTech & Services
95General Electric$19.7United StatesEnergy & Utilities
96CRCC$19.7ChinaEnergy & Utilities
97Walgreens$19.7United StatesRetail & Consumer Goods
98Vodafone$19.5United KingdomMedia & Telecoms
99Aldi$19.2GermanyRetail & Consumer Goods
100RBC$19.0CanadaBanking & Insurance

After Apple, coming in a close second is Amazon with a brand value of $350.3 billion. This is not surprising, considering the tech giant has often found itself neck-and-neck with Apple in the rankings, and has even come in first place in previous editions of the report.

One other brand worth highlighting is TikTok. The social media company saw a 215% increase in its brand value year-over-year, making it the fastest-growing brand on the entire list.

Between 2019 and 2021, the platform saw its userbase skyrocket, growing from 291.4 million to 655.9 million in just two years. If this growth continues, TikTok could reach nearly one billion users by 2025, according to projections from Insider Intelligence.

Most Valuable Sectors

Over a third of the brands on the list fall into the tech and services sector. Combined, this category has a brand value of $2.0 trillion.

SectorBrand Value% of Top 100
Tech & Services$2.0 trillion36.8%
Media & Telecoms$1.0 trillion19.2%
Retail & Consumer Goods$910 billion16.8%
Banking & Insurance$634 billion11.7%
Energy & Utilities$411 billion7.6%
Automobiles$400 billion7.4%
Healthcare$33 billion0.6%

Media is the second most valuable sector—19% of the top 100 brands fall under the media and telecoms sector, including Google, Facebook, and WeChat.

COVID-19 is partly the reason for this, as media consumption increased throughout the global pandemic. For example, in the first nine months of 2021, Snapchat’s daily usage grew by 77%. Despite increased traction with users, it’s worth noting the company is now feeling the sting as the real world competes for attention spans once again and advertisers begin to ghost the app due to recession jitters.

As pandemic restrictions fade out around the world, and murmurs of a global recession threaten global economic growth, next year’s report could see some big shifts in brand value.

The Geography of Valuable Brands

When looking at where these brands are based, we see that the United States and China account for 73 of the top 100 brands on the ranking. Even more surprising—just six countries make up 94% of the list.

The growth of Chinese companies on the global stage is reflected in this visualization. As a point of comparison, a decade ago, only six Chinese companies made Brand Finance’s Top 100 ranking, and none of them were in the top 30 for brand value.

most valuable brands by country

Interestingly, European countries only make up 14% of the list, which is a testament to just how much Europe’s economic dominance has dwindled over the last few decades.

Back in the 1960s, Europe accounted for nearly a third of the world’s total GDP. But by 2017, it had dropped down to 16%. According to a forecast by the Pardee Center of the University of Denver, the EU’s share of global GDP is expected to drop down to 10% by 2100.

Of course, if history has taught us anything, it’s that a lot can change over the span of a century. How a ranking like this will look in coming decades is anyone’s guess.

Where does this data come from?

Source: Brand Finance Global 500 Report

Important note: The values shown above are brand value calculations as opposed to market capitalization. See below for more details.

How is brand value calculated? In simple terms, the methodology for calculating “brand value” is a formula that is as follows:

Brand Strength (BSI) x Brand Royalty Rate x Brand Revenues = Brand Value

Brand Strength Index (BSI) looks at brand investment, brand equity, and brand performance. The brand royalty rate is determined based on sector. Lastly, forecast brand-specific revenues are determined based on the proportion of parent company revenues attributable to the brand in question. Brand value itself is discounted to net present value.

We recommend visiting page 94 and 99 of the report to view the full explanation of the methodology.

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When Will Air Travel Return to Pre-Pandemic Levels?

COVID-19 hit the air travel industry hard. But passenger traffic is slowly recovering, and by 2025, things are expected to return to ‘normal.’

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when will air travel return to pre-COVID levels?

When Will Air Travel Return to Pre-Pandemic Levels?

Many industries were hit hard by the global pandemic, but it can be argued that air travel suffered one of the most severe blows.

The aviation industry as a whole suffered an estimated $370 billion loss in global revenue because of COVID-19. And while air travel has been slowly recovering from the trough, flight passenger traffic has yet to fully bounce back.

Where is the industry at in 2022 compared to pre-COVID times, and when is air passenger travel expected to return to regular levels? This graphic by Julie R. Peasley uses data from IATA to show current and projected air passenger ridership.

Air Travel Traffic: 2021 and 2022

After an incredibly difficult 2020, the airline industry started to see significant improvements in travel frequency. But compared to pre-pandemic levels, there’s a lot of ground to cover.

In 2021, overall passenger numbers only reached 47% of 2019 levels. This influx was largely driven by domestic travel, with international passenger numbers only reaching 27% of pre-COVID levels.

Passenger numbers (% of 2019)20212022
International27%69%
Domestic61%93%
Africa46%76%
Asia Pacific40%68%
Caribbean44%72%
Central America72%96%
Europe40%86%
Middle East42%81%
North America56%94%
South America51%88%
Industry-wide47%83%

From a regional perspective, Central America experienced one of the fastest recoveries. In 2021, overall passenger numbers in the region had reached 72% of 2019 levels, and they are projected to reach 96% by the end of 2022.

In fact, the Americas as a whole has seen a quick recovery. Both North America and South America also reached above 50% of 2019 ridership in 2021, and are projected to reach 94% and 88% ridership in 2022, respectively.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, Asia Pacific has experienced the slowest recovery. This is likely due to stricter lockdowns and travel restrictions put into effect in this region (which was harder hit by SARS in 2003), especially in places like Shanghai.

Forecasting Traffic in 2023 and Beyond

While recovery has looked different from region to region, airlines are largely expected to see a full recovery to their ridership levels by 2025.

Forecasted Passengers (% of 2019)202320242025
International82%92%101%
Domestic103%111%118%
Africa85%93%101%
Asia Pacific84%97%109%
Caribbean82%92%101%
Central America102%109%115%
Europe96%105%111%
Middle East90%98%105%
North America102%107%112%
South America97%103%108%
Industry-wide94%103%111%

This recovery is a signifier of a much broader mindset shift, as governments continue to reassess their COVID-19 management strategies.

But while the future seems promising, IATA stressed that the forecast does not take into account the potential impact of the Russia-Ukraine conflict and other geopolitical concerns, which could have far-reaching consequences on the global economy (and travel) in the coming years.

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All of the World’s Money and Markets in One Visualization (2022)

From the wealth held to billionaires to all debt in the global financial system, we look at the vast universe of money and markets in 2022.

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All of the World’s Money and Markets in One Visualization

The era of easy money is now officially over.

For 15 years, policymakers have tried to stimulate the global economy through money creation, zero interest-rate policies, and more recently, aggressive COVID fiscal stimulus.

With capital at near-zero costs over this stretch, investors started to place more value on cash flows in the distant future. Assets inflated and balance sheets expanded, and money inevitably chased more speculative assets like NFTs, crypto, or unproven venture-backed startups.

But the free money party has since ended, after persistent inflation prompted the sudden reversal of many of these policies. And as Warren Buffett says, it’s only when the tide goes out do you get to see “who’s been swimming naked.”

Measuring Money and Markets in 2022

Every time we publish this visualization, our common unit of measurement is a two-dimensional box with a value of $100 billion.

Even though you need many of these to convey the assets on the balance sheet of the U.S. Federal Reserve, or the private wealth held by the world’s billionaires, it’s quite amazing to think what actually fits within this tiny building block of measurement:

What fits in a $100 billion box?

Our little unit of measurement is enough to pay for the construction of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, while also buying every team in the NHL and digging FTX out of its financial hole several times over.

Here’s an overview of all the items we have listed in this year’s visualization:

Asset categoryValueSourceNotes
SBF (Peak Net Worth)$26 billionBloombergNow sits at <$1B
Pro Sports Teams$340 billionForbesMajor pro teams in North America
Cryptocurrency$760 billionCoinMarketCapPeaked at $2.8T in 2021
Ukraine GDP$130 billionWorld BankComparable to GDP of Mississippi
Russia GDP$1.8 trillionWorld BankThe world's 11th largest economy
Annual Military Spending$2.1 trillionSIPRI2021 data
Physical currency$8.0 trillionBIS2020 data
Gold$11.5 trillionWorld Gold CouncilThere are 205,238 tonnes of gold in existence
Billionaires$12.7 trillionForbesSum of fortunes of all 2,668 billionaires
Central Bank Assets$28.0 trillionTrading EconomicsFed, BoJ, Bank of China, and Eurozone only
S&P 500$36.0 trillionSlickchartsNov 20, 2022
China GDP$17.7 trillionWorld Bank
U.S. GDP$23.0 trillionWorld Bank
Narrow Money Supply$49.0 trillionTrading EconomicsIncludes US, China, Euro Area, Japan only
Broad Money Supply $82.7 trillionTrading EconomicsIncludes US, China, Euro Area, Japan only
Global Equities$95.9 trillionWFELatest available 2022 data
Global Debt$300.1 trillionIIFQ2 2022
Global Real Estate$326.5 trillionSavills2020 data
Global Private Wealth$463.6 trillionCredit Suisse2022 report
Derivatives (Market)$12.4 trillionBIS
Derivatives (Notional)$600 trillionBIS

Has the Dust Settled Yet?

Through previous editions of our All the World’s Money and Markets visualization, we’ve created snapshots of the world’s assets and markets at different points in time.

For example, in our 2017 edition of this visualization, Apple’s market capitalization was only $807 billion, and all crypto assets combined for $173 billion. The global debt total was at $215 trillion.

Asset2017 edition2022 editionChange (%)
Apple market cap$807 billion$2.3 trillion+185%
Crypto$173 billion$760 billion+339%
Fed Balance Sheet$4.5 trillion$8.7 trillion+93%
Stock Markets$73 trillion$95.9 trillion+31%
Global Debt$215 trillion$300 trillion+40%

And in just five years, Apple nearly quadrupled in size (it peaked at $3 trillion in January 2022), and crypto also expanded into a multi-trillion dollar market until it was brought back to Earth through the 2022 crash and subsequent FTX implosion.

Meanwhile, global debt continues to accumulate—growing by $85 trillion in the five-year period.

With interest rates expected to continue to rise, companies making cost cuts, and policymakers reining in spending and borrowing, today is another unique snapshot in time.

Now that the easy money era is over, where do things go from here?

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