Infographic: The Biggest Public Company in Each U.S. State
Connect with us

Misc

The Biggest Public Company in Every U.S. State

Published

on

The Biggest Public Company in Every U.S. State

The Biggest Public Company in Every U.S. State

The range in magnitude between public companies is always humbling. Investors trade billions of dollars in the shares of behemoths like Apple and General Electric in a day. Meanwhile, the majority of companies couldn’t be valued at a billion dollars even in the wildest dreams of their management teams.

When looking at the largest public company in each state, one would think that it would be a collection of roughly 50 behemoths. Surprisingly, this is not the case at all.

Our friends at Blender Media pulled up the market capitalization of the largest pubcos in each state, and they are now beautifully arranged in today’s infographic. The data for all of the companies is below, and it is somewhat staggering.

Yes, Apple is huge as it tries to continue its journey to $1 trillion in value. There are some other big companies as well: Microsoft, Berkshire Hathaway, and ExxonMobil are all worth over $300 billion. However, the list also really starts to drop off halfway through.

Regions Financial Corp. is the biggest pubco in Alabama ($14 billion), Extra Space Storage is crushing it in Utah ($9.7 billion), IDEXX Laboratories is big in Maine ($7.4 billion), but then things get even more obscure.

Alaska’s largest public company, General Communication, trades at a market capitalization of only $700 million. Meanwhile, Wyoming’s biggest company is technically a smallcap: Cloud Peak Energy is worth only $166 million in value.

StateCompany NameMarket Cap (Billions)Stock Symbol
CaliforniaApple Inc.668.7AAPL
WashingtonMicrosoft Corporation378.62MSFT
NebraskaBerkshire Hathaway Inc.349.11BRK-A
TexasExxon Mobil Corporation323.84XOM
New JerseyJohnson & Johnson275.08JNJ
ConnecticutGeneral Electric263.1GE
New YorkJPMorgan Chase & Co.251.77JPM
ArkansasWalmart224.28WMT
OhioProcter & Gamble Company203.74PG
North CarolinaBank of America Corporation184.76BAC
GeorgiaCoca-Cola Company180.02KO
PennsylvaniaComcast Corporation150.02CMCSK
Rhode IslandCVS Health Corporation121.12CVS
MinnesotaUnitedHealth Group Inc.119.77UNH
IllinoisAbbVie Inc.113.97ABBV
VirginiaAltria Group108.54MO
DelawareWalgreens Boots Alliance, Inc.100.45WBA
OregonNike, Inc.98.04NIKE
IndianaEli Lilly and Company88.28LLY
MassachusettsBiogen Inc.73.29BIIB
MarylandLockheed Martin Corporation66.13LMT
District of ColumbiaDanaher Corporation62.65DHR
MissouriExpress Scripts Holding Company61.13ESRX
MichiganFord Motor Company59.69F
FloridaNextEra Energy, Inc.49.41NEE
TennesseeFedEx Corporation46.96FDX
NevadaLas Vegas Sands Corp.41.31LVS
OklahomaWilliams Companies, Inc.40.34WMB
KentuckyYum! Brands, Inc.36.24YUM
WisconsinJohnson Controls, Inc.29.68JCI
ColoradoChipotle Mexican Grill Inc.23.28CMG
ArizonaSouthern Copper Corporation21.5SCCO
KansasSprint Corporation18.61S
IdahoMicron Technology, Inc.17.68MU
IowaPrincipal Financial Group Inc.16.97PFG
LouisianaCenturyLink, Inc.15.88CTL
AlabamaRegions Financial Corporation13.95RF
UtahExtra Space Storage Inc.9.65EXR
South CarolinaScana Corporation8.14SCG
VermontKeurig Green Mountain, Inc.7.79GMCR
MaineIDEXX Laboratories, Inc.7.35IDXX
New HampshireWhite Mountains Insurance Group, Ltd.4.35WTM
North DakotaMDU Resources Group, Inc.3.63MDU
HawaiiHawaiian Electric Industries Inc.3.29HE
West VirginiaUnited Bankshares, Inc.2.76USBI
South DakotaNorthWestern Corporation2.62NW E
MississippiCal-Maine Foods, Inc.2.52CALM
New MexicoPNM Resources, Inc.2.2PNM
MontanaGlacier Bancorp, Inc.2.12CBCI
AlaskaGeneral Communication, Inc.0.697GNCMA
WyomingCloud Peak Energy Inc.0.166CLD

Original graphic by: Blender Media

Subscribe to Visual Capitalist
Click for Comments

Demographics

Visualizing Population Density Patterns in Six Countries

These maps show the population density of several countries, using 3D spikes to denote where more people live.

Published

on

beautifully rendered population density maps of six major countries

As of 2022, Earth has 8 billion humans. By 2050, the population is projected to grow to 10 billion.

In the last 100 years, the global population more than quadrupled. But none of this growth has been evenly spread out, including within countries.

This series of 3D maps from Terence Teo, an associate professor at Seton Hall University, renders the population density of six countries using open-source data from Kontur Population. He used popular programming language R and a path-tracing package, Rayshader, to create the maps.

France and Germany: Population Density Spikes and Troughs

Let’s take a look at how the population spreads out in different countries around the world. Click the images to explore higher-resolution versions.

This image shows a map of France and its population spread.

France is the world’s 7th largest economy and second-most-populous country in the EU with 65 million people. But a staggering one-fifth of the French population lives in Paris and its surrounding metro—the most populous urban area in Europe.

Many residents in the Paris metropolitan area are employed in the service sector, which makes up one-third of France’s $2.78 trillion gross domestic product.

This image shows a map of Germany and its population spread.

Unlike France, Germany has many dense cities and regions, with Berlin, Munich, Stuttgart, and Cologne all having over a million residents. Berlin is the most populated at 3.5 million residents in the city proper, and 6 million in the wider urban area.

That said, the relatively recent reunification of West and East Germany in 1991 meant that post-WWII growth was mostly concentrated in West Germany (and West Berlin).

Italy and Chile: Coast to Coast

In Italy, another phenomenon affects population density and urban development—a sprawling coastline.

This image shows a map of Italy and its population spread.

Despite having a large population of 59 million and large metropolitan areas throughout, Italy’s population spikes are closer to the water.

The port cities of Genoa, Napoli, and Palermo all have large spikes relative to the rest of the country, as does the capital, Rome. Despite its city center located 15 miles inland from the sea, it extends to the shore through the district of Ostia, where the ancient port of Rome existed.

This image shows a map of Chile and its population spread.

Meanwhile in Chile, stuck between the Andes to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west, population spikes corroborate with its many port towns and cities.

However, the country is more concentrated than Italy, with 40% of its residents congregating around the capital of Santiago.

Turkey and Canada: Marred by Mountains and Climes

Though Chile has difficulties with terrain, it is relatively consistent. Other countries have to attempt to settle many different climes—regions defined by their climates.

This image shows a map of Türkiye and its population spread.

Mountains to the south and east, a large, semi-arid plateau, and even a small desert leave few centers of urban growth in Türkiye.

Predictably, further west, as the elevation comes down to the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, population spikes begin to heighten. The largest of course is the economic and cultural hub of Istanbul, though the capital Ankara is also prominent with more than 5 million residents.

This image shows a map of Canada and its population spread.

In Canada, the Rocky Mountains to the west and freezing cold temperatures in the center and north account for the large country’s relative emptiness.

Though population spikes in Western Canada are growing rapidly, highly populous urban centers are noticeably concentrated along the St. Lawrence River, with the Greater Toronto Area accounting for more than one-sixth of the country’s 39 million people.

Increasing Urbanization

According to the World Bank, more than half of the world’s population currently lives in cities, and that trend is only growing.

By 2050, 7 out of 10 people are projected to live in cities. This congregation makes cities a beehive of productivity and innovation—with more than 80% of the world’s GDP being generated at these population centers.

It’s in this context that mapping and studying urban development becomes all the more important, particularly as policymakers try their hand at sustainable urban planning.

As Teo puts it:

“By showing where people are (and are not), they show us where political and economic power is concentrated, and perhaps where and who our governments represent.”

Continue Reading

Subscribe

Popular