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Forecasting the Investing Habits of the Millennial Generation

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Forecasting the Investing Habits of the Millennial Generation

Forecasting the Investing Habits of the Millennial Generation

According to Accenture, millennials are set to inherit the biggest wealth transfer in history, amounting to an estimated $30 trillion over the course of 30 to 40 years.

While it’s hard to know what this newest generation of investors will do once the funds hit their accounts, there is no shortage of speculation about the habits and attitudes that will characterize their collective approach to wealth management as they age.

Surveying Millennial Investors

Today’s infographic is the result of a partnership with our friends at Morning Brew, a daily business briefing newsletter that skews towards a millennial audience.

It showcases the results of their recent audience survey, which had 9,800 respondents from North America and Europe. All respondents fell between the ages of 18 and 35, representing a group that roughly equates to the business leaders of tomorrow.

The survey’s aim: to get a peek at their current financial habits and attitudes towards investing.

Who is Investing?

Of the respondents, a majority of 68.1% is employed full-time while another 27.6% identified as students. The remaining 4.2% is employed part-time or answered “other”.

Financial goals for these respondents were quite diversified, as seen below.

Primary financial goal:

  • 23.8% – Earning a graduate/master’s degree
  • 21.5% – Buying a car
  • 19.6% – Getting married
  • 19.0% – Buying a primary home
  • 7.3% – Opening a business
  • 6.4% – Having a child
  • 2.3% – Buying a vacation home

It’s worth keeping in mind that people in this segment can be at very different stages in their lives. Those at the lower end (18-22 years) are just starting their adult years, while those at the higher end (30-35 years) can be quite a ways into their professional careers.

Portfolio Size and Composition

The vast majority of the cohort surveyed said they invest (89%), with the most common bracket of money invested rising steadily as respondents got older:

  • 18 to 22 years old: $1,001-$5,000 (31.7%)
  • 23 to 27 years old: $10,001-$50,000 (36.7%)
  • 28 to 35 years old: $50,000+ (42.0%)

Not surprisingly, technology was the preferred sector to invest in for many in the pool of respondents. Nearly half of people (49.7%) said tech was their favorite sector, with healthcare (12.1%), energy (11.5%), and real estate (9.9%) appearing on the radar as well.

Many sectors were underrepresented here, with financial services (5.6%), consumer staples (4.8%), and consumer discretionary (3.1%) having a relatively low amount of interest. Even worse off were the utilities, industrials, telecommunications, and materials sectors, which held virtually no interest (<2%) among millennial investors.

Millennial Investing Habits

Millennials rate their level of expertise in investing as pretty limited, with only 18.3% of respondents expressing that they had high confidence in their own investment abilities. This is a finding that is consistent with the growing financial literacy problem in America.

The respondents preferred the human touch of financial advisors (70.2%) to robo advisors (29.9%), and were lukewarm towards social impact investing with only 21.1% seeing it as being very important.

As a final exclamation point on the survey results, millennial investors were very clear on what was important to them, and it’s low fees.

When asked how they decide on a professional service, 42.4% saw low fees as a top three deciding factor. At the same time, simplicity (11.6%) and breadth of asset classes (13.1%) were well behind in importance.

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U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

U.S. debt interest payments have surged past the $1 trillion dollar mark, amid high interest rates and an ever-expanding debt burden.

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This line chart shows U.S. debt interest payments over modern history.

U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The cost of paying for America’s national debt crossed the $1 trillion dollar mark in 2023, driven by high interest rates and a record $34 trillion mountain of debt.

Over the last decade, U.S. debt interest payments have more than doubled amid vast government spending during the pandemic crisis. As debt payments continue to soar, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reported that debt servicing costs surpassed defense spending for the first time ever this year.

This graphic shows the sharp rise in U.S. debt payments, based on data from the Federal Reserve.

A $1 Trillion Interest Bill, and Growing

Below, we show how U.S. debt interest payments have risen at a faster pace than at another time in modern history:

DateInterest PaymentsU.S. National Debt
2023$1.0T$34.0T
2022$830B$31.4T
2021$612B$29.6T
2020$518B$27.7T
2019$564B$23.2T
2018$571B$22.0T
2017$493B$20.5T
2016$460B$20.0T
2015$435B$18.9T
2014$442B$18.1T
2013$425B$17.2T
2012$417B$16.4T
2011$433B$15.2T
2010$400B$14.0T
2009$354B$12.3T
2008$380B$10.7T
2007$414B$9.2T
2006$387B$8.7T
2005$355B$8.2T
2004$318B$7.6T
2003$294B$7.0T
2002$298B$6.4T
2001$318B$5.9T
2000$353B$5.7T
1999$353B$5.8T
1998$360B$5.6T
1997$368B$5.5T
1996$362B$5.3T
1995$357B$5.0T
1994$334B$4.8T
1993$311B$4.5T
1992$306B$4.2T
1991$308B$3.8T
1990$298B$3.4T
1989$275B$3.0T
1988$254B$2.7T
1987$240B$2.4T
1986$225B$2.2T
1985$219B$1.9T
1984$205B$1.7T
1983$176B$1.4T
1982$157B$1.2T
1981$142B$1.0T
1980$113B$930.2B
1979$96B$845.1B
1978$84B$789.2B
1977$69B$718.9B
1976$61B$653.5B
1975$55B$576.6B
1974$50B$492.7B
1973$45B$469.1B
1972$39B$448.5B
1971$36B$424.1B
1970$35B$389.2B
1969$30B$368.2B
1968$25B$358.0B
1967$23B$344.7B
1966$21B$329.3B

Interest payments represent seasonally adjusted annual rate at the end of Q4.

At current rates, the U.S. national debt is growing by a remarkable $1 trillion about every 100 days, equal to roughly $3.6 trillion per year.

As the national debt has ballooned, debt payments even exceeded Medicaid outlays in 2023—one of the government’s largest expenditures. On average, the U.S. spent more than $2 billion per day on interest costs last year. Going further, the U.S. government is projected to spend a historic $12.4 trillion on interest payments over the next decade, averaging about $37,100 per American.

Exacerbating matters is that the U.S. is running a steep deficit, which stood at $1.1 trillion for the first six months of fiscal 2024. This has accelerated due to the 43% increase in debt servicing costs along with a $31 billion dollar increase in defense spending from a year earlier. Additionally, a $30 billion increase in funding for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in light of the regional banking crisis last year was a major contributor to the deficit increase.

Overall, the CBO forecasts that roughly 75% of the federal deficit’s increase will be due to interest costs by 2034.

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