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The Biggest Global Risks of 2023

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The Biggest Global Risks of 2023

The profile of risks facing the world is evolving constantly. Events like last year’s invasion of Ukraine can send shockwaves through the system, radically shifting perceptions of what the biggest risks facing humanity are.

Today’s graphic summarizes findings from the Global Risks Report, an annual publication produced by the World Economic Forum (WEF). It provides an overview of the most pressing global risks that the world is facing, as identified by experts and decision-makers.

These risks are grouped into five general categories: economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal, and technological.

Let’s dive into this year’s findings.

2023’s Risk Profile

In the lower–middle portion of the chart are the risks that could have serious impacts—such as attacks involving nuclear or biological weapons—but that were highlighted by fewer experts.

Over in the top-right quadrant of the chart are the risks that a number of experts mentioned, and that are causing a strain on society. Not surprisingly, the top risks are related to issues that impact a wide variety of people, such as the rising cost of living and inflation. When staples like food and energy become more expensive, this can fuel unrest and political instability—particularly in countries that already had simmering discontent. WEF points out that increases in fuel prices alone led to protests in an estimated 92 countries.

One risk worth watching is geoeconomic confrontation, which includes sanctions, trade wars, investment screening, and other actions that have the intent of weakening the countries on the receiving end. Efforts to mitigate this risk result in some of the key themes we see for the coming year. One example is the onshoring of industries, and “friend-shoring”, which is essentially moving operations to a foreign country that has more stable relations with one’s home country.

How Prepared Are We?

It’s one thing to be aware of risks, but it’s quite another to have the ability to head off negative events when they come to fruition.

The chart below is a look at how prepared we are globally to deal with specific types of risks that could arise in the next few years.

At the top of the chart are risks that experts feel society is better equipped to handle with current plans and resources. Moving towards the bottom of the chart are risks that experts feel are more of a threat since mechanisms for handling them are weak or non-existent.

global risk preparedness in 2023

Experts are generally more confident in solutions in the military or healthcare domains. Environmental and societal challenges leave policy and decision-makers less confident.

One telling observation from the data above is that none of the risks left a majority of experts feeling confident in our ability to prevent the risk from occurring, or prepared to mitigate its impact. As the 2020s are shaping up to be a turbulent decade, that could be a cause for concern.

Where does this data come from?

Source: The Global Risks Report 2023, produced by the World Economic Forum (in partnership with Marsh McLennan and Zurich Insurance Group).

Data note: The chart in this article is based on the Global Risks Perception Survey 2022-2023. A list of 32 global risks, along with their definitions, is shown in Table A.1 of the PDF. Page 77 of the report also includes detailed information on sample sizes and demographics of respondents.

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Sports

Ranked: Which NHL Team Takes Home the Most Revenue?

The Oilers are the second-highest earning team in the NHL and the Panthers are 26th. We show the top teams in the NHL by revenue in 2023.

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Visualization of NHL team revenues

Which NHL Team Takes Home the Most Revenues?

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

This graphic shows every NHL team’s revenue from the 2022/23 season using data from Forbes, compiled by JP Morgan Asset Management.

Ranked: The Highest-Earning NHL Teams

As the final round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs wears on, two teams on different ends of the revenue spectrum face off.

Despite representing a much smaller city than the other teams at the top of the ranking, the Edmonton Oilers have the second highest revenue in the league at $281 million. The Oilers have seen the fastest revenue growth over the past five years (13%) as the team has improved.

Team2022-23 Season RevenueValuation
Toronto Maple Leafs$281M$2.8B
Edmonton Oilers$281M$1.9B
Los Angeles Kings$279M$2.0B
New York Rangers$265M$2.7B
Montreal Canadiens$265M$2.3B
New Jersey Devils$240M$1.5B
Boston Bruins$239M$1.9B
Vegas Golden Knights$233M$1.1B
Chicago Blackhawks$228M$1.9B
Philadelphia Flyers$219M$1.7B
Washington Capitals$218M$1.6B
Dallas Stars$210M$1.1B
Pittsburgh Penguins$207M$1.2B
Detroit Red Wings$199M$1.2B
Vancouver Canucks$198M$1.3B
Seattle Kraken$197M$1.2B
Tampa Bay Lightning$196M$1.3B
Minnesota Wild$185M$1.1B
St Louis Blues$184M$1.0B
New York Islanders$183M$1.6B
Calgary Flames$183M$1.1B
Colorado Avalanche$182M$1.2B
Nashville Predators$180M$1.0B
Carolina Hurricanes$177M$0.8B
Anaheim Ducks$164M$0.9B
Winnipeg Jets$162M$0.8B
Florida Panthers$161M$0.8B
Buffalo Sabres$159M$0.8B
San Jose Sharks$158M$0.9B
Columbus Blue Jackets$151M$0.8B
Ottawa Senators$128M$1.0B
Arizona Coyotes$120M$0.5B

In the 2022/23 season, the Florida Panthers pulled off a major upset in the first round of the playoffs and fought their way to the finals before losing to the Vegas Golden Knights.

Despite the success last season, the Panthers still find themselves in the bottom six in this ranking, with $161 million in revenue. The team also has the second lowest operating income in the league, after Ottawa. Florida is an emerging hockey market though, with revenue increasing 9% over the past five years.

Other Hockey Revenue Highlights

  • Along with the Oilers, the Toronto Maple Leafs sit at the top of the revenue ranking. There is a key difference though: the Maple Leafs have a higher valuation-to-revenue multiple (10x vs 6.6x).
  • Professional hockey remains attractive to advertisers. In the 2022/23 season, team-specific sponsorship revenue was 36% higher than in 2018/19.
  • The team with the lowest revenue, the Arizona Coyotes, will be moving to Utah next season.
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