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Top Emerging Markets for Investment in 2024

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See this visualization first on the Voronoi app.

Graphic illustrating the top ten emerging markets according to their FDI momentum in 2024.

Top Emerging Markets for Investment in 2024

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Foreign direct investment (FDI) refers to the investment made by individuals, companies, or entities from one country into businesses, assets, or ventures located in another country.

FDI plays a pivotal role in global economic development, as it facilitates capital flows, fosters business expansion, and contributes to job creation and economic growth.

In this graphic, we illustrate the top 10 emerging markets according to their FDI momentum in 2024. This ranking comes from fDi Intelligence and was published in December 2023.

Cambodia Tops the List

The 10 countries with the strongest FDI prospects for 2024 are spread across Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Europe.

Asia features six countries on the list, with Cambodia expected to carry the strongest investment momentum this year.

With a GDP growth forecasted at 6.1% in 2024, up from 5.6% in 2023, the IMF expects Cambodia to be the fastest-growing economy in Southeast Asia. The country has strengthened its trade relationships with China, South Korea, and the EU.

Additionally, Cambodia has benefited from a recovery in tourism since China started lifting its COVID-related travel restrictions earlier in 2023.

CountryGDP GrowthGrowth in FDI Capex (CAGR '21-'23)Growth in FDI Projects (CAGR '21-'23)
🇰🇭 Cambodia6.1%393%110%
🇵🇭 Philippines5.9%312%51%
🇰🇪 Kenya5.3%246%50%
🇮🇶 Iraq2.9%371%95%
🇳🇦 Namibia2.7%570%83%
🇰🇿 Kazakhstan4.2%277%63%
🇦🇿 Azerbaijan2.5%413%116%
🇲🇦 Morocco3.6%204%27%
🇷🇸 Serbia3.0%219%29%
🇮🇳 India6.3%127%55%

Meanwhile, the IMF expects the Philippines, in second place, increase GDP growth from 5.3% to 5.9% in 2024. Both public and private investment have played a key role in reinforcing its growth, bolstered by the opening of the renewable energy sector to foreign investors.

Kenya occupies the third spot.

The African nation has seen increasing foreign direct investment in various sectors. Recently, the U.S.-based pharmaceutical company Moderna finalized an agreement to invest up to $500 million to build its first African facility for the production of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines in Kenya—one of the first of its kind in Africa.

The country’s energy sector has also attracted strong FDI interest, with Dubai-based AMEA Power announcing in September 2023 the intention to produce green hydrogen in Mombasa, with total investment estimated at $2.29 billion.

Serbia was the only country outside Asia and Africa to make it into the top 10, securing ninth place.

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Markets

U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

U.S. debt interest payments have surged past the $1 trillion dollar mark, amid high interest rates and an ever-expanding debt burden.

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This line chart shows U.S. debt interest payments over modern history.

U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The cost of paying for America’s national debt crossed the $1 trillion dollar mark in 2023, driven by high interest rates and a record $34 trillion mountain of debt.

Over the last decade, U.S. debt interest payments have more than doubled amid vast government spending during the pandemic crisis. As debt payments continue to soar, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reported that debt servicing costs surpassed defense spending for the first time ever this year.

This graphic shows the sharp rise in U.S. debt payments, based on data from the Federal Reserve.

A $1 Trillion Interest Bill, and Growing

Below, we show how U.S. debt interest payments have risen at a faster pace than at another time in modern history:

DateInterest PaymentsU.S. National Debt
2023$1.0T$34.0T
2022$830B$31.4T
2021$612B$29.6T
2020$518B$27.7T
2019$564B$23.2T
2018$571B$22.0T
2017$493B$20.5T
2016$460B$20.0T
2015$435B$18.9T
2014$442B$18.1T
2013$425B$17.2T
2012$417B$16.4T
2011$433B$15.2T
2010$400B$14.0T
2009$354B$12.3T
2008$380B$10.7T
2007$414B$9.2T
2006$387B$8.7T
2005$355B$8.2T
2004$318B$7.6T
2003$294B$7.0T
2002$298B$6.4T
2001$318B$5.9T
2000$353B$5.7T
1999$353B$5.8T
1998$360B$5.6T
1997$368B$5.5T
1996$362B$5.3T
1995$357B$5.0T
1994$334B$4.8T
1993$311B$4.5T
1992$306B$4.2T
1991$308B$3.8T
1990$298B$3.4T
1989$275B$3.0T
1988$254B$2.7T
1987$240B$2.4T
1986$225B$2.2T
1985$219B$1.9T
1984$205B$1.7T
1983$176B$1.4T
1982$157B$1.2T
1981$142B$1.0T
1980$113B$930.2B
1979$96B$845.1B
1978$84B$789.2B
1977$69B$718.9B
1976$61B$653.5B
1975$55B$576.6B
1974$50B$492.7B
1973$45B$469.1B
1972$39B$448.5B
1971$36B$424.1B
1970$35B$389.2B
1969$30B$368.2B
1968$25B$358.0B
1967$23B$344.7B
1966$21B$329.3B

Interest payments represent seasonally adjusted annual rate at the end of Q4.

At current rates, the U.S. national debt is growing by a remarkable $1 trillion about every 100 days, equal to roughly $3.6 trillion per year.

As the national debt has ballooned, debt payments even exceeded Medicaid outlays in 2023—one of the government’s largest expenditures. On average, the U.S. spent more than $2 billion per day on interest costs last year. Going further, the U.S. government is projected to spend a historic $12.4 trillion on interest payments over the next decade, averaging about $37,100 per American.

Exacerbating matters is that the U.S. is running a steep deficit, which stood at $1.1 trillion for the first six months of fiscal 2024. This has accelerated due to the 43% increase in debt servicing costs along with a $31 billion dollar increase in defense spending from a year earlier. Additionally, a $30 billion increase in funding for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in light of the regional banking crisis last year was a major contributor to the deficit increase.

Overall, the CBO forecasts that roughly 75% of the federal deficit’s increase will be due to interest costs by 2034.

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