Connect with us

Misc

The Most Spoken Language in Every U.S. State (Besides English and Spanish)

Published

on

The-Most-Spoken-Language-Besides-English-Spanish-in-Every-State

The Most Spoken Language in Every U.S. State (Besides English and Spanish)

While 78% of Americans speak only English at home, between 350 and 430 languages can be found in the United States.

Spanish is the second most common language, spoken in 62% of non-English-speaking households.

In this graphic, WordFinderX used Census data to uncover the most spoken languages (aside from English and Spanish) in American neighborhoods.

German is the Most Spoken Language in 13 States

During the mid-18th century, German immigrants played a significant role in early American society. They constituted one-third of the population of American colonies, ranking second in numbers only to the English.

As a consequence, German now stands as the third most prevalent language in 13 states, with over 40 million Americans claiming German ancestry.

StateMost Spoken Language (Besides English and Spanish)
AlaskaAleut languages
AlabamaGerman
ArkansasGerman
ArizonaNavajo
CaliforniaChinese
ColoradoGerman
ConnecticutPortuguese
District of ColumbiaFrench
DelawareChinese
FloridaHaitian Creole
GeorgiaKorean
HawaiiJapanese
IowaArabic
IdahoGerman
IllinoisPolish
IndianaGerman
KansasChinese
KentuckyGerman
LouisianaFrench
MassachusettsPortuguese
MarylandFrench
MaineFrench
MichiganArabic
MinnesotaHmong
MissouriGerman
MississippiVietnamese
MontanaGerman
North CarolinaFrench
North DakotaGerman
NebraskaGerman
New HampshireFrench
New JerseyPortuguese
New MexicoNavajo
NevadaTagalog
New YorkChinese
OhioArabic
OklahomaVietnamese
OregonRussian
PennsylvaniaChinese
Rhode IslandPortuguese
South CarolinaFrench
South DakotaDakota languages
TennesseeArabic
TexasVietnamese
UtahPortuguese
VirginiaKorean
VermontFrench
WashingtonChinese
WisconsinGerman
West VirginiaGerman
WyomingGerman

From military aid to ideological support, France played a pivotal role in the success of the American Revolution. More than two centuries later, approximately 9.4 million people in the U.S. claim French or French-Canadian ancestry.

In the Midwest, French stands as the most spoken language (following English and Spanish) in four major cities.

The-Most-Spoken-Languages-by-City-Besides-English-Spanish-in-the-Midwestern-US

In the Midwest’s largest city, Chicago, Polish is the third-most common spoken language.

Asian Languages in the American West

The American West is home to 45% of all U.S. Asians, making Asian languages the most spoken in many cities, following English and Spanish.

Tagalog is the most spoken language in nine cities, ranging from Anchorage, Alaska, where half of the local Asian community is Filipino, to Las Vegas, Nevada, home to one of the largest Filipino-American communities in the country.

Chinese dominates in California and Washington, while Japanese ranks as the third most common language in Hawaii.

The Most Spoken Languages in New York

In the late 1800s, people worldwide chose to emigrate to the United States, leaving their homes due to crop failure, land and job shortages, rising taxes, and famine. Many also saw the U.S. as a land of economic opportunity.

More than 70% of all immigrants entered through New York City, which came to be known as the “Golden Door.

The-Most-Spoken-Languages-Besides-English-Spanish-in-New-York-City

As a result, the city today has an eclectic mix of languages.

While numerous languages across America thrive, some face imminent extinction. These include rare regional dialects, like the Pawpaw French in Minnesota, and indigenous languages.

According to the National Congress of American Indians, all surviving Native American languages are severely endangered, with over 90% of them at risk of extinction by 2050.

Various initiatives, including leveraging technology, have been proposed to ensure the preservation of the diverse cultures and languages in the U.S.

green check mark icon

This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

Click for Comments

Personal Finance

Mapped: The Income a Family Needs to Live Comfortably in Every U.S. State

Families in expensive states require over $270,000 annually to live comfortably.

Published

on

A map showing the income that two working adults with two children need to live comfortably in each U.S. state.

The Income a Family Needs to Live Comfortably in Every U.S. State

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Families in the top five most expensive U.S. states require an annual income exceeding $270,000 to live comfortably.

This visualization illustrates the income necessary for two working adults with two children to maintain a comfortable lifestyle in each state.

“Comfortable” is defined as the income needed to cover a 50/30/20 budget, with 50% allocated to necessities like housing and utilities, 30% to discretionary spending, and 20% to savings or investments.

The calculations for family income needed in each state were done by SmartAsset, using the cost of necessities sourced from the MIT Living Wage Calculator, last updated on Feb. 14, 2024.

Massachusetts Tops the List

Massachusetts is the most expensive state to live comfortably in, requiring a total family income of about $301,184. Hawaii ($294,611) comes in second, followed by Connecticut ($279,885).

Housing is one main reason Massachusetts is an expensive state to live in, particularly in the Boston area. In addition, the state also has a high cost of living, including expenses such as healthcare and utilities.

RankStateIncome for 2 working adults raising 2 children
1Massachusetts$301,184
2Hawaii$294,611
3Connecticut$279,885
4New York$278,970
5California$276,723
6Colorado$264,992
7Washington$257,421
8Oregon$257,338
9New Jersey$251,181
10Rhode Island$249,267
11Vermont$248,352
12Minnesota$244,774
13New Hampshire$244,109
14Alaska$242,611
15Maryland$239,450
16Nevada$237,286
17Virginia$235,206
18Illinois$231,962
19Arizona$230,630
20Pennsylvania$230,464
21Maine$229,549
22Delaware$228,966
23Wisconsin$225,056
24Utah$218,483
25Michigan$214,490
26Nebraska$213,075
27Georgia$212,826
28Montana$211,411
28Iowa$211,411
30Idaho$211,245
31North Carolina$209,331
31Ohio$209,331
33Florida$209,082
34Indiana$206,003
35New Mexico$203,923
36Wyoming$203,424
37Missouri$202,259
38North Dakota$202,176
39Texas$201,344
40South Carolina$200,762
41Kansas$196,768
42Tennessee$195,770
43Oklahoma$194,106
44Alabama$193,606
45South Dakota$192,608
46Kentucky$190,112
47Louisiana$189,613
48West Virginia$189,363
49Arkansas$180,794
50Mississippi$177,798

Meanwhile, Mississippi is the least expensive state for a family to live comfortably, requiring $177,798 per year. Arkansas ($180,794) comes in second, followed by West Virginia ($189,363). In common, all these states share low prices of housing.

Learn More About Cost of Living From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoyed this post, be sure to check out this graphic, which ranks the median down payment for a house by U.S. state.

Continue Reading
Visualizing Asia's Water Dilemma

Subscribe

Popular