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Mapped: Gas Prices in Every U.S. State

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Mapped: Gas Prices in Every U.S. State

Mapped: Gas Prices in Every U.S. State

Gas prices fluctuate from state to state due to factors such as local taxes, environmental regulations, reliance on local production or imports, and the proximity of refineries.

In this infographic, we use data from the American Automobile Association (AAA) to illustrate the cost of fueling a vehicle in each U.S. state.

Tax Breaks and Environmental Regulation

According to the AAA, the national average price of regular unleaded gas was $3.54 per gallon as of October 25, 2023.

There are 29 states where gas prices are below the national average. Georgia, where the government has suspended the gas tax to help the population deal with inflation, has the cheapest fuel right now.

RankStateCost per Gallon (as of 10/25/2023)
1Georgia$3.01
2Mississippi$3.02
3Texas$3.03
4Louisiana$3.08
5Alabama$3.09
6South Carolina$3.11
7Arkansas$3.13
8Tennessee$3.14
9Kentucky$3.19
10Delaware$3.20
11Missouri$3.22
12Ohio$3.22
13Oklahoma$3.23
14North Carolina$3.24
15Wisconsin$3.26
16Iowa$3.30
17Florida$3.32
18Virginia$3.33
19Indiana$3.36
20Kansas$3.37
21Maryland$3.37
22Michigan$3.37
23West Virginia$3.38
24New Jersey$3.43
25Minnesota$3.43
26Nebraska$3.45
27New Mexico$3.48
28New Hampshire$3.50
29Rhode Island$3,54

Proximity to refineries is a major contributing factor to prices. States like Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama often have lower prices than other regions.

Meanwhile, West Coast states dominate the list of jurisdictions with more expensive gas. With high local taxes and a unique gasoline blend designed to reduce emissions but which increases prices, California tops the list.

RankState Cost per Gallon (as of 10/25/2023)
1California$5.39
2Hawaii$4.77
3Washington$4.76
4Nevada$4.67
5Oregon$4.42
6Alaska$4.32
7Arizona$4.13
8Idaho$3.93
9Montana$3.88
10Utah$3.81
11New York$3.77
12Pennsylvania$3.72
13District of Columbia$3.69
14Colorado$3.66
15Wyoming$3.66
16North Dakota$3.65
17Vermont$3.65
18Connecticut$3.62
19Illinois$3.62
20Maine$3.60
21Massachusetts$3.60
22South Dakota$3.54

When it comes to fuel taxes, California leads with 77.90¢ per gallon.

Gas tax price by state

Alaska has the cheapest gas tax rates, at 8.95 cents per gallon.

When Will Gas Prices Go Down?

Despite global tensions and concerns that conflict in the Middle East could escalate, gas prices typically decline in the autumn months.

For example, U.S. crude oil futures have risen about 5% since the Israel-Hamas war started earlier this month, while the national average retail gasoline cost is actually $0.34 lower than September’s $3.88.

This is because gasoline prices often rise during peak driving seasons, such as summer, when more people embark on road trips and travel. In addition, gas stations switch to a less expensive winter blend of gasoline after September.

According to AAA, gas prices will likely continue to drop until the end of the year.

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Energy

The World’s Biggest Oil Producers in 2023

Just three countries accounted for 40% of global oil production last year.

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Donut chart showing the biggest oil producers by country in 2023.

The World’s Biggest Oil Producers in 2023

This was originally posted on Elements. Sign up to the free mailing list to get beautiful visualizations on natural resource megatrends in your email.

Despite efforts to decarbonize the global economy, oil still remains one of the world’s most important resources. It’s also produced by a fairly limited group of countries, which can be a source of economic and political leverage.

This graphic illustrates global crude oil production in 2023, measured in million barrels per day, sourced from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

Three Countries Account for 40% of Global Oil Production

In 2023, the United States, Russia, and Saudi Arabia collectively contributed 32.7 million barrels per day to global oil production.

Oil Production 2023Million barrels per day
🇺🇸 U.S.12.9
🇷🇺 Russia10.1
🇸🇦 Saudi Arabia9.7
🇨🇦 Canada4.6
🇮🇶 Iraq4.3
🇨🇳 China4.2
🇮🇷 Iran3.6
🇧🇷 Brazil3.4
🇦🇪 UAE3.4
🇰🇼 Kuwait2.7
🌍 Other22.8

These three nations have consistently dominated oil production since 1971. The leading position, however, has alternated among them over the past five decades.

In contrast, the combined production of the next three largest producers—Canada, Iraq, and China—reached 13.1 million barrels per day in 2023, just surpassing the production of the United States alone.

In the near term, no country is likely to surpass the record production achieved by the U.S. in 2023, as no other producer has ever reached a daily capacity of 13.0 million barrels. Recently, Saudi Arabia’s state-owned Saudi Aramco scrapped plans to increase production capacity to 13.0 million barrels per day by 2027.

In 2024, analysts forecast that the U.S. will maintain its position as the top oil producer. In fact, according to Macquarie Group, U.S. oil production is expected to achieve a record pace of about 14 million barrels per day by the end of the year.

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