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Mapped: The 50 Richest Women in the World in 2021

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Mapped: The 50 Richest Women in the World

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Mapped: The 50 Richest Women in the World in 2021

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According to a recent census by Wealth-X, 11.9% of global billionaires are women. Even at such a minority share, this group still holds massive amounts of wealth.

Using a real-time list of billionaires from Forbes, we examine the net worth of the 50 richest women in the world and which country they’re from.

Where are the World’s Richest Women?

The richest woman in the world, Francoise Bettencourt Meyers and family own 33% of stock in L’Oréal S.A., a French personal care brand. She is also the granddaughter of its founder.

In April 2019, L’Oréal and the Bettencourt Meyers family pledged $226 million (€200 million) towards the repair of the Notre Dame cathedral after its devastating fire.

Following closely behind is Alice Walton of the Walmart empire—also the world’s richest family. Together with her brothers, they own over 50% of the company’s shares. That’s a pretty tidy sum, considering Walmart raked in $524 billion in revenues in their 2020 fiscal year.

Other family ties among the richest women in the world include Jacqueline Mars and her four granddaughters, heiresses to a slice of the Mars Inc. fortune in candy and pet food—and all of them make this list.

RankNameNet Worth ($B)Country
#1Francoise Bettencourt Meyers & family$71.4🇫🇷 France
#2Alice Walton$68.0🇺🇸 United States
#3MacKenzie Scott$54.9🇺🇸 United States
#4Julia Koch & family$44.9🇺🇸 United States
#5Yang Huiyan & family$31.4🇨🇳 China
#6Jacqueline Mars$28.9🇺🇸 United States
#7Susanne Klatten$25.8🇩🇪 Germany
#8Zhong Huijuan$23.5🇨🇳 China
#9Laurene Powell Jobs & family$22.1🇺🇸 United States
#10Iris Fontbona & family$21.0🇨🇱 Chile
#11Zhou Qunfei & family$18.6🇭🇰 Hong Kong
#12Fan Hongwei & family$17.9🇨🇳 China
#13Gina Rinehart$17.4🇦🇺 Australia
#14Charlene de Carvalho-Heineken & family$17.1🇳🇱 Netherlands
#15Wu Yajun$16.3🇨🇳 China
#16Abigail Johnson$15.0🇺🇸 United States
#17Kirsten Rausing$13.5🇸🇪 Sweden
#18Kwong Siu-hing$13.0🇭🇰 Hong Kong
#19Lu Zhongfang$12.7🇨🇳 China
#20Wang Laichun$12.7🇨🇳 China
#21Cheng Xue$10.8🇨🇳 China
#22Massimiliana Landini Aleotti & family$10.6🇮🇹 Italy
#23Denise Coates$9.9🇬🇧 United Kingdom
#24Lam Wai Ying$9.1🇭🇰 Hong Kong
#25Ann Walton Kroenke$9.1🇺🇸 United States
#26Savitri Jindal & family$8.7🇮🇳 India
#27Nancy Walton Laurie$8.2🇺🇸 United States
#28Blair Parry-Okeden$8.2🇺🇸 United States
#29Diane Hendricks$8.0🇺🇸 United States
#30Christy Walton$7.8🇺🇸 United States
#31Zhao Yan$7.8🇨🇳 China
#32Zeng Fangqin$7.6🇨🇳 China
#33Magdalena Martullo-Blocher$7.5🇨🇭 Switzerland
#34Rahel Blocher$7.4🇨🇭 Switzerland
#35Marie-Hélène Habert$7.2🇫🇷 France
#36Pamela Mars$7.2🇺🇸 United States
#37Victoria Mars$7.2🇺🇸 United States
#38Valerie Mars$7.2🇺🇸 United States
#39Marijke Mars$7.2🇺🇸 United States
#40Sandra Ortega Mera$7.1🇪🇸 Spain
#41Antonia Ax:son Johnson & family$7.0🇸🇪 Sweden
#42Sofie Kirk Kristiansen$6.9🇩🇰 Denmark
#43Agnete Kirk Thinggaard$6.9🇩🇰 Denmark
#44Li Haiyan$6.7🇨🇳 China
#45Ronda Stryker$6.6🇺🇸 United States
#46Marie Besnier Beauvalot$6.3🇫🇷 France
#47Zheng Shuliang & family$6.2🇨🇳 China
#48Meg Whitman$5.8🇺🇸 United States
#49Chan Laiwa & family$5.8🇨🇳 China
#50Maria Asuncion Aramburuzabala & family$5.8🇲🇽 Mexico

All data as of January 15, 2021 (9AM PST)

MacKenzie Scott, ranked #3 on the list, was heavily involved in the early days of turning Amazon into an e-commerce behemoth. She was involved in areas from bookkeeping and accounts to negotiating the company’s first freight contract. Her high-profile divorce from Jeff Bezos captured the headlines, notably because she gained control over 4% of Amazon’s outstanding shares.

The total value of these shares? An eye-watering $38.3 billion—propelling her to the status of one of America’s richest people.

However, MacKenzie Scott has more altruistic ventures in mind for this wealth. In 2020, she gave away $5.8 billion towards causes such as climate change and racial equality in just four months, and is a signatory on the Giving Pledge.

[Scott’s near $6 billion donation has] to be one of the biggest annual distributions by a living individual.

—Melissa Berman, CEO of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors

Looking towards the East, Yang Huiyan became the richest woman in Asia after inheriting 70% of shares in the property development company Country Garden Holdings. The company went public in 2007, raising $1.6 billion in its IPO—an amount comparable to Google’s IPO in 2004.

To aid frontline health workers during the pandemic, Country Garden Holdings set up robotic, automated buffet stations to safely serve medical staff in Wuhan, China.

Giving Generously

While the 50 richest women in the world have certainly made progress, the overall tier of billionaires is still very much a boys’ club. One thing that also factors into this could be the way this wealth is spent.

As many female billionaires inherited their wealth, a large share are more inclined to contribute to charitable causes where they can use their money to make an impact. What percentage of billionaires by gender have contributed at least $1 million in donations over the past five years?

Made $1mm in donations over last 5 years (%)

Source of wealth👩 Female philanthropists👨 Male philanthropists
Inherited68%5%
Inherited/Self-made20%28%
Self-made12%67%

Source: Wealth-X

Meanwhile, male billionaires are more likely to donate to charity if they built the wealth themselves—and many companies that fall into this category certainly stepped up during the early days of the COVID-19 crisis.

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Retail

Ranked: The 20 Top Retailers Worldwide, by Revenue

The global retail landscape is constantly evolving amid shifting consumer behaviors. We show the top retailers worldwide in 2024.

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The Top Retailers Worldwide, by Revenue

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The global retail landscape is constantly evolving, driven by shifting consumer habits and the growing dominance of online sales.

Despite the rise of e-commerce, many of the top retailers worldwide generate the bulk of their sales in physical stores. However, as customers prioritize convenience and a wider selection of goods, e-commerce giants are capturing an increasing share of the retail market.

This graphic shows the world’s leading retailers by revenue, based on data from the National Retail Federation.

The Methodology

To be included in the rankings, companies must engage in a goods-for-consumer resale business accessible to the public. Additionally, they must and have direct selling operations in a minimum of three companies. The rankings include both public and private companies, based on the most recent 52-week period ending between January and March 2024. All revenue figures were converted to U.S. dollars.

Ranked: The Top 20 Global Retailers

Below, we show the world’s leading retail giants by revenue:

RankingRetailerTotal RevenuesShare of Domestic Retail RevenueHeadquarters
1Walmart$628.6B84.7%🇺🇸 U.S.
2Amazon.com$355.1B70.4%🇺🇸 U.S.
3Costco$234.0B75.0%🇺🇸 U.S.
4Schwarz Group$176.4B32.0%🇩🇪 Germany
5The Home Depot$151.6B93.7%🇺🇸 U.S.
6Aldi$145.4B25.8%🇩🇪 Germany
7Walgreens Boots Alliance$117.8B89.3%🇺🇸 U.S.
8Ahold Delhaize$97.0B21.8%🇳🇱 Netherlands
9Alibaba$94.1B97.3%🇨🇳 China
10Carrefour$89.7B34.3%🇫🇷 France
11Seven & I$85.0B62.1%🇯🇵 Japan
12Apple$81.6B86.9%🇺🇸 U.S.
13Rewe$73.5B75.5%🇩🇪 Germany
14Aeon$68.9B93.3%🇯🇵 Japan
15Tesco$61.9B85.1%🇬🇧 UK
16TJX$50.4B78.9%🇺🇸 U.S.
17Leclerc$50.4B95.0%🇫🇷 France
18IKEA$45.6B3.4%🇸🇪 Sweden
19Best Buy$44.6B92.8%🇺🇸 U.S.
20Woolworths Limited (Aus)$43.5B88.2%🇦🇺 Australia

As the largest retailer by sales globally, Walmart raked in $628.6 billion dollars in revenue, with 84.7% of its revenue being domestic.

Today, about 90% of Americans are located within 10 miles of a Walmart store, attracting 200 million visitors each month. To gain a greater edge in the market, Walmart is expanding its advertising business, launching a premium product line, and growing its digital sales channels.

Additionally, it is opening 150 stores in the U.S over the next five years, its largest expansion in almost a decade.

With $355.1 billion in sales, e-commerce titan Amazon ranks in second. In 2024, the company is projected to account for 40.4% of U.S. e-commerce sales. Along with this, Amazon operates physical stores through its Whole Foods subsidiary, Amazon Go, and Amazon Fresh storefronts, yet these make up a fraction of its total retail sales.

As Asia’s largest retailer, Alibaba, falls in ninth place, driven by its Taobao and Tmall online marketplace platforms. While domestic sales comprise the majority of its retail revenues, the company is increasingly focusing on its overseas business given sluggish domestic consumption in China. Notably, retail sales jumped 44% year-over-year across its international retail operations as of the quarter ending in December 2023.

Despite regulatory crackdowns in recent years, it is the seventh-largest company by market cap in the country as of March 2024 across publicly-traded firms.

Retailers With the Highest International Revenues

Across the top 20 retailers by revenue, Germany’s Schwarz Group generated the most sales from international revenues, at $119.9 billion.

As Europe’s largest retailer, Schwarz Group operates in 30 countries worldwide, with overseas operations accounting for 68% of all revenues. Overall, the family-owned multinational serves 7.2 billion customers annually across 14,112 stores.

Swedish furniture giant, IKEA, generates 96.6% of its retail revenues from international stores, the highest share overall. Given that Sweden is known for its steep corporate tax rates, the company strategically expanded its operations worldwide, while retaining the core essence of its brand.

In recent years, the company has experimented with creating more compact stores in urban centers, unlike its traditional suburban warehouses. Through this strategy, its aiming to drive revenues from higher traffic volume in malls as opposed to customers who travel to stores less frequently, but buy more products.

Beyond these retail giants, a number of European chains generate more than half of their revenues from international operations, including Germany’s discount grocery company, Aldi, and France’s Carrefour.

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