Mapped: The Wealthiest Person in Every U.S. State in 2020
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Mapped: The Wealthiest Person in Every U.S. State in 2020

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The Wealthiest Person in Every U.S. State in 2020

The Wealthiest Person in Every U.S. State

There are different degrees of wealth that exist, even among the richest in America.

For example, a heavy-hitting millionaire might have the most impressive fortune in his or her home state — but venture a few miles across the state border, and suddenly they become a small fish in a much bigger pond.

Today’s map comes to us from HowMuch.net, and it shows the incredible variance in the biggest fortunes on a state-by-state basis.

The Rich List, by State

Below is the full list containing the wealthiest person in every U.S. state, based on calculations by Forbes in early March 2020.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos tops the list with a net worth of $117.1 billion in the state of Washington — meanwhile, the smallest fortune on the list is located in Alaska at just $0.3 billion.

RankPersonStateNet Worth ($B)
#1Jeff BezosWashington$117.1
#2Warren BuffettNebraska$89.6
#3Mark ZuckerbergCalifornia$81.9
#4Michael BloombergNew York$58.4
#5Jim WaltonArkansas$51.9
#6Alice WaltonTexas$51.7
#7Charles KochKansas$42.8
#8Sheldon AdelsonNevada$41.4
#9Phil Knight and familyOregon$40.0
#10Jacqueline MarsVirginia$30.2
#11John MarsWyoming$30.2
#12Ray DalioConnecticut$18.7
#13Thomas PeterffyFlorida$17.6
#14Abigail JohnsonMassachusetts$16.0
#15Pierre OmidyarHawaii$13.2
#16Ken GriffinIllinois$13.1
#17Thomas Frist Jr and familyTennessee$13.0
#18John Menard JrWisconsin$11.7
#19Philip AnschutzColorado$11.5
#20Carl CookIndiana$10.4
#21Jim KennedyGeorgia$9.9
#22Harold Hamm & familyOklahoma$9.7
#23James GoodnightNorth Carolina$8.0
#24Victoria MarsPennsylvania$7.5
#25Pauline MacMillan KeinathMissouri$6.9
#26Dennis WashingtonMontana$6.7
#27Daniel GilbertMichigan$6.5
#28Ernest Garcia IIArizona$6.2
#29John OverdeckNew Jersey$6.1
#30Ted Lerner and familyMaryland$5.5
#31Harry StineIowa$5.4
#32Tamara GustavsonKentucky$5.0
#33Les Wexner and familyOhio$4.5
#34Frank VanderSlootIdaho$3.7
#35Gayle BensonLouisiana$3.1
#36Glen TaylorMinnesota$2.8
#37T. Denny SanfordSouth Dakota$2.4
#38Susan AlfondMaine$1.9
#39Anita ZuckerSouth Carolina$1.9
#40Jonathan NelsonRhode Island$1.8
#41Gail MillerUtah$1.6
#42Jim Justice IIWest Virginia$1.5
#43James and Thomas DuffMississippi$1.4
#44Gary TharaldsonNorth Dakota$1.0
#45Jimmy RaneAlabama$0.9
#46Elizabeth Snyder and Robert GoreDelaware$0.9
#47Andrea Reimann-CiardelliNew Hampshire$0.7
#48Mack C. ChaseNew Mexico$0.7
#49John AbeleVermont$0.6
#50Leonard Hyde, Jonathan Rubini and FamiliesAlaska$0.3

While all of the names above are considered extraordinarily wealthy in their home states, there is still a magnitude of difference involved. The low end of the list ($0.3 billion) would need to multiply their fortune by 390 times to get up to the $117.1 billion Bezos level.

To put this another way, the same degree of difference exists between the median household wealth in the U.S. (~$100,000) and a multi-millionaire with $39 million to their name.

Rising and Falling Fortunes

The above figures were obtained prior to the COVID-19 market crash, which will surely impact the size of some of the fortunes listed here.

Who will be most and least impacted by the recent stock market turmoil?

Even though Jeff Bezos has most of his wealth tied up in Amazon stock, so far it has been relatively unaffected by the volatility. With more people staying home because of social distancing, orders on online platforms such as Amazon have exploded.

Similarly to Amazon, the heirs of the Walmart fortune in the Walton family — including Jim Walton, Alice Walton, and Rob Walton — are also seeing Walmart’s stock price hold relatively steady in the face of volatility. In fact, some analysts consider Walmart to be the ultimate “recession-proof” stock, as consumers flock to discount goods in poor economic times.

Warren Buffett is also an interesting case. Though the stock market has certainly disrupted the real-time value of his fortune, that’s not the game that Warren Buffett plays. In fact, he is known for waiting for times of crisis to deploy his cash, and has a significant stockpile of money ready for just this kind of situation.

Billionaires like Sheldon Adelson in Nevada or Philip Anschutz of Colorado might be singing a different tune than some of the other above magnates. Adelson, for example, owns a good chunk of the Las Vegas Strip, as well as casinos and hotels in Singapore and Macao. Unfortunately, tourism-related businesses are some of the hardest hit in the COVID-19 crash.

Meanwhile, Anschutz owns the Coachella Music Festival and stakes in many professional sports teams (LA Lakers, LA Kings, and multiple MLS teams), which have all been impacted by the cancellation of big events and gatherings throughout the country. Like many others, Anschutz is probably itching for things to get back to normal.

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This Infographic Breaks Down Careers In Finance, From Hedge Funds to M&A

Corporate finance oversees trillions of dollars and makes modern markets and economies possible, but who are the main players?

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Careers In Corporate Finance, From Hedge Funds to M&A

Corporate finance is a key pillar on which modern markets and economies have been built. And this complex ecosystem consists of a number of important sectors, which can lead to lucrative career avenues.

From lending to investment banking, and private equity to hedge funds, the graphic above by Wall Street Prep breaks down the key finance careers and paths that people can take.

Let’s take a further look at the unique pieces of this finance ecosystem.

The Lending Business

Lending groups provide much needed capital to corporations, often in the form of term loans or revolvers. These can be part of short and long-term operations or for events less anticipated like the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in companies shoring up $222 billion in revolving lines of credit within the first month.

Investment Banking

Next, is investment banking, which can split into three main areas:

  1. Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A): There’s a lot of preparation and paperwork involved whenever corporations merge or make acquisitions. For that reason, this is a crucial service that investment banks provide, and its importance is reflected in the enormous fees recognized. The top five U.S. investment banks collect $10.2 billion in M&A advisory fees, representing 40% of the $25 billion in global M&A fees per year.
  2. Loan Syndications: Some $16 billion in loan syndication fees are collected annually by investment banks. Loan syndications are when multiple lenders fund one borrower, which can occur when the loan amount is too large or risky for one party to take on. The loan syndication agent is the financial institution involved that acts as the third party to oversee the transaction.
  3. Capital Markets: Capital markets are financial markets that bring buyers and sellers together to engage in transactions on assets. They split into debt capital markets (DCM) like bonds or fixed income securities and equity capital markets (ECM) (i.e. stocks). Some $41 billion is collected globally for the services associated with structuring and distributing stock and bond offerings.

The top investment banks generally all come from the U.S. and Western Europe, and includes the likes of Goldman Sachs and Credit Suisse.

Sell Side vs Buy Side

Thousands of analysts in corporate finance represent both the buy and sell-sides of the business, but what are the differences between them?

One important difference is in the groups they represent. Buy-side analysts usually work for institutions that buy securities directly, like hedge funds, while sell-side analysts represent institutions that make their money by selling or issuing securities, like investment banks.

According to Wall Street Prep, here’s how the assets of buy-side institutions compare:

Buy side institutionTotal assets
Mutual Funds, ETFs$21 trillion
Private equity$5 trillion
Hedge funds$3 trillion
Venture capital$0.5 trillion

Also, buy-side jobs appear to be more sought after across financial career forums.

Breaking Down The Buy Side

Mutual funds, ETFs, and hedge funds all generally invest in public markets.

But between them, there are still some differentiating factors. For starters, mutual funds are the largest entity, and have been around since 1924. Hedge funds didn’t come to life until around 1950 and for ETFs, this stretched to the 1990s.

Furthermore, hedge funds are strict in the clients they take on, with a preference for high net worth investors, and they often engage in sophisticated investment strategies like short selling. In contrast, ETFs, and mutual funds are widely available to the public and the vast bulk of them only deploy long strategies, which are those that expect the asset to rise in value.

Private equity (PE) and venture capital (VC) are groups that invest in private companies. Venture capital is technically a form of PE but tends to invest in new startup companies while private equity goes for more stable and mature companies with predictable cash flow patterns.

Who funds the buy side? The source of capital roughly breaks down as follows:

Source of capitalCapital amount
Individuals$112 trillion
Banks$51 trillion
Pension funds$34 trillion
Insurance Companies$24 trillion
Endowments$1.4 trillion

Endowment funds are foundations that invest the assets of nonprofit institutions like hospitals or universities. The assets are typically accumulated through donations, and withdrawals are made frequently to fund various parts of operations, including critical ones like research.

The largest university endowment belongs to Harvard with some $74 billion in assets under management. However, the largest endowment fund overall belongs to Ensign Peak Advisors. They represent The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), with some $124 billion in assets.

Primary Market vs Secondary Market

One of the primary motivations for a company to enter the public markets is to raise capital, where a slice of the company’s ownership is sold via an allotment of shares to new investors. The actual capital itself is raised in the primary market, which represents the first and initial transaction.

The secondary market represents transactions after the first. These are considered stocks that are already issued, and shares now fluctuate based on market forces.

Tying It All Together

As the infographic above shows, corporate finance branches out far and wide, handles trillions of dollars, and plays a key part in making modern markets and economies possible.

For those exploring a career in finance, the possibilities and avenues one can take are practically endless.

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Visualizing the $94 Trillion World Economy in One Chart

Which countries and regions contribute the most to the world economy? In this infographic, we break down all $94 trillion of global GDP by country.

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World Economy

The $94 Trillion World Economy in One Chart

View the expanded version of this infographic.

Just four countries—the U.S., China, Japan, and Germany—make up over half of the world’s economic output by gross domestic product (GDP) in nominal terms. In fact, the GDP of the U.S. alone is greater than the combined GDP of 170 countries.

How do the different economies of the world compare? In this visualization we look at GDP by country in 2021, using data and estimates from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

An Overview of GDP

GDP serves as a broad indicator for a country’s economic output. It measures the total market value of final goods and services produced in a country in a specific timeframe, such as a quarter or year. In addition, GDP also takes into consideration the output of services provided by the government, such as money spent on defense, healthcare, or education.

Generally speaking, when GDP is increasing in a country, it is a sign of greater economic activity that benefits workers and businesses (while the reverse is true for a decline).

The World Economy: Top 50 Countries

Who are the biggest contributors to the global economy? Here is the ranking of the 50 largest countries by GDP in 2021:

RankCountryGDP ($T)% of Global GDP
1🇺🇸 U.S.$22.924.4%
2🇨🇳 China$16.917.9%
3🇯🇵 Japan$5.15.4%
4🇩🇪 Germany$4.24.5%
5🇬🇧 UK$3.13.3%
6🇮🇳 India$2.93.1%
7🇫🇷 France$2.93.1%
8🇮🇹 Italy$2.12.3%
9🇨🇦 Canada$2.02.1%
10🇰🇷 Korea$1.81.9%
11🇷🇺 Russia$1.61.7%
12🇧🇷 Brazil$1.61.7%
13🇦🇺 Australia$1.61.7%
14🇪🇸 Spain$1.41.5%
15🇲🇽 Mexico$1.31.4%
16🇮🇩 Indonesia$1.21.2%
17🇮🇷 Iran$1.11.1%
18🇳🇱 Netherlands$1.01.1%
19🇸🇦 Saudi Arabia$0.80.9%
20🇨🇭 Switzerland$0.80.9%
21🇹🇷 Turkey$0.80.8%
22🇹🇼 Taiwan $0.80.8%
23🇵🇱 Poland$0.70.7%
24🇸🇪 Sweden$0.60.7%
25🇧🇪 Belgium$0.60.6%
26🇹🇭 Thailand$0.50.6%
27🇮🇪 Ireland$0.50.5%
28🇦🇹 Austria$0.50.5%
29🇳🇬 Nigeria$0.50.5%
30🇮🇱 Israel$0.50.5%
31🇦🇷 Argentina$0.50.5%
32🇳🇴 Norway$0.40.5%
33🇿🇦 South Africa$0.40.4%
34🇦🇪 UAE$0.40.4%
35🇩🇰 Denmark$0.40.4%
36🇪🇬 Egypt$0.40.4%
37🇵🇭 Philippines$0.40.4%
38🇸🇬 Singapore$0.40.4%
39🇲🇾 Malaysia$0.40.4%
40🇭🇰 Hong Kong SAR$0.40.4%
41🇻🇳 Vietnam$0.40.4%
42🇧🇩 Bangladesh$0.40.4%
43🇨🇱 Chile$0.30.4%
44🇨🇴 Colombia$0.30.3%
45🇫🇮 Finland$0.30.3%
46🇷🇴 Romania$0.30.3%
47🇨🇿 Czech Republic$0.30.3%
48🇵🇹 Portugal$0.30.3%
49🇵🇰 Pakistan$0.3*0.3%
50🇳🇿 New Zealand$0.20.3%

*2020 GDP (latest available) used where IMF estimates for 2021 were unavailable.

At $22.9 trillion, the U.S. GDP accounts for roughly 25% of the global economy, a share that has actually changed significantly over the last 60 years. The finance, insurance, and real estate ($4.7 trillion) industries add the most to the country’s economy, followed by professional and business services ($2.7 trillion) and government ($2.6 trillion).

China’s economy is second in nominal terms, hovering at near $17 trillion in GDP. It remains the largest manufacturer worldwide based on output with extensive production of steel, electronics, and robotics, among others.

The largest economy in Europe is Germany, which exports roughly 20% of the world’s motor vehicles. In 2019, overall trade equaled nearly 90% of the country’s GDP.

The World Economy: 50 Smallest Countries

On the other end of the spectrum are the world’s smallest economies by GDP, primarily developing and island nations.

With a GDP of $70 million, Tuvalu is the smallest economy in the world. Situated between Hawaii and Australia, the largest industry of this volcanic archipelago relies on territorial fishing rights.

In addition, the country earns significant revenue from its “.tv” web domain. Between 2011 and 2019, it earned $5 million annually from companies—including Amazon-owned Twitch to license the Twitch.tv domain name—equivalent to roughly 7% of the country’s GDP.

CountriesRegionGDP (B)
🇹🇻 TuvaluOceania$0.07
🇳🇷 NauruOceania$0.1
🇵🇼 PalauOceania$0.2
🇰🇮 KiribatiOceania$0.2
🇲🇭 Marshall IslandsOceania$0.2
🇫🇲 MicronesiaOceania$0.4
🇨🇰 Cook IslandsOceania$0.4*
🇹🇴 TongaOceania$0.5
🇸🇹 São Tomé and PríncipeAfrica$0.5
🇩🇲 DominicaCaribbean$0.6
🇻🇨 St. Vincent and the GrenadinesCaribbean$0.8
🇼🇸 SamoaOceania$0.8
🇰🇳 St. Kitts and NevisCaribbean$1.0
🇻🇺 VanuatuOceania$1.0
🇬🇩 GrenadaCaribbean$1.1
🇰🇲 ComorosAfrica$1.3
🇸🇨 SeychellesAfrica$1.3
🇦🇬 Antigua and BarbudaCaribbean$1.4
🇬🇼 Guinea-BissauAfrica$1.6
🇸🇧 Solomon IslandsOceania$1.7
🇹🇱 Timor-LesteAsia$1.7
🇱🇨 St. LuciaCaribbean$1.7
🇸🇲 San MarinoEurope$1.7
🇨🇻 Cabo VerdeAfrica$1.9
🇧🇿 BelizeCentral America$1.9
🇬🇲 GambiaAfrica$2.0
🇪🇷 EritreaAfrica$2.3
🇱🇸 LesothoAfrica$2.5
🇧🇹 BhutanAsia$2.5
🇨🇫 Central African RepublicAfrica$2.6
🇸🇷 SurinameSouth America$2.8
🇦🇼 ArubaCaribbean$2.9
🇧🇮 BurundiAfrica$3.2
🇦🇩 AndorraEurope$3.2
🇸🇸 South SudanAfrica$3.3
🇱🇷 LiberiaAfrica$3.4
🇩🇯 DjiboutiAfrica$3.7
🇸🇱 Sierra LeoneAfrica$4.4
🇸🇿 EswatiniAfrica$4.5
🇲🇻 MaldivesAsia$4.6
🇫🇯 FijiOceania$4.6
🇧🇧 BarbadosCaribbean$4.7
🇸🇴 SomaliaAfrica$5.4
🇲🇪 MontenegroEurope$5.5
🇱🇮 LiechtensteinEurope$6.8*
🇬🇾 GuyanaSouth America$7.4
🇲🇨 MonacoEurope$7.4*
🇹🇯 TajikistanAsia$8.1
🇰🇬 Kyrgyz RepublicAsia$8.2
🇹🇬 TogoAfrica$8.5

*2019 GDP (latest available) used where IMF estimates for 2021 were unavailable.

Like Tuvalu, many of the world’s smallest economies are in Oceania, including Nauru, Palau, and Kiribati. Additionally, several countries above rely on the tourism industry for over one-third of their employment.

The Fastest Growing Economies in the World in 2021

With 123% projected GDP growth, Libya’s economy is estimated to have the sharpest rise.

Oil is propelling its growth, with 1.2 million barrels being pumped in the country daily. Along with this, exports and a depressed currency are among the primary factors behind its recovery.

RankCountryRegion
2021 Real GDP Growth (Annual % Change)
1🇱🇾 Libya Africa123.2%
2🇬🇾 Guyana South America20.4%
3🇲🇴 Macao Asia20.4%
4🇲🇻 Maldives Asia18.9%
5🇮🇪 Ireland Europe13.0%
6🇦🇼 Aruba Caribbean12.8%
7🇵🇦 Panama Central America12.0%
8🇨🇱 Chile South America11.0%
9🇵🇪 PeruSouth America10.0%
10🇩🇴 Dominican RepublicCaribbean9.5%

Ireland’s economy, with a projected 13% real GDP growth, is being supported by the largest multinational corporations in the world. Facebook, TikTok, Google, Apple, and Pfizer all have their European headquarters in the country, which has a 12.5% corporate tax rate—or about half the global average. But these rates are set to change soon, as Ireland joined the OECD 15% minimum corporate tax rate agreement which was finalized in October 2021.

Macao’s economy bounced back after COVID-19 restrictions began to lift, but more storm clouds are on the horizon for the Chinese district. The CCP’s anti-corruption campaign and recent arrests could signal a more strained relationship between Mainland China and the world’s largest gambling hub.

Looking Ahead at the World’s GDP

The global GDP figure of $94 trillion may seem massive to us today, but such a total might seem much more modest in the future.

In 1970, the world economy was only about $3 trillion in GDP—or 30 times smaller than it is today. Over the next thirty years, the global economy is expected to more or less double again. By 2050, global GDP could total close to $180 trillion.

Correction: In earlier versions of this graphic, countries such as Vietnam and Pakistan were inadvertently not included in the visualization. They have now been added. In cases where the IMF has no data for 2021 (specifically Pakistan, Syria, Afghanistan, and Lebanon), the latest available data is used.

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