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Do You Want Fries With That? [Chart]

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Do You Want Fries With That? [Chart]

Do You Want Fries With That? [Chart]

Over half of U.S. jobs created this year are in Food or Retail

The Chart of the Week is a weekly Visual Capitalist feature on Fridays.

Every month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases its Employment Situation report, summing up the most recent government figures on employment in the United States. Investors use this information to gauge the health of the domestic economy, paying close attention to the unemployment rate, nonfarm payrolls, labor force participation, and wage growth.

While this report gets dissected to death each month, we thought we’d take a more nuanced view by profiling the two sectors that have supplied the lion’s share of job growth in 2016 so far.

Numbers in Q1

In the first three months of 2016, a total of 589,000 private sector jobs were created.

A variety of sectors contributed to this growth, including industries such as construction and healthcare. In particular, however, it was the “Accommodation and Food Services” and “Retail Trade” segments that added the most new workers. In combination, these sectors are the source for 51% of all new U.S. jobs in 2016 to date.

While there’s absolutely nothing wrong with job growth in these sectors, an important point from an investment perspective must be made. Typically speaking, these are jobs that pay on the lower end of the spectrum, and they do little to move the needle on making the overall economy richer and more diversified.

Sector Comparison

To get an idea of the jobs that are being created, here are the five most popular positions in each segment:

Accommodation and Food Services

  • Waiters and waitresses (18.9%)
  • Cooks (16.1%)
  • Food service managers (7.6%)
  • Cashiers (7.4%)
  • Food preparation (6.6%)

Retail Trade

  • Retail salespersons (19.7%)
  • Firstline supervisors (16.2%)
  • Cashiers (13.3%)
  • Stock clerks (7.0%)
  • Customer service (4.6%)

Here’s also the salary and age profile of each segment, as well as a comparison to the Manufacturing sector, which lost 29,000 jobs in March.

Accommodation and Food Services

  • Average age: 32.7
  • Average salary: $20,495
  • Share making <$20k per year: 63.8%

Retail Trade

  • Average age: 38.5
  • Average salary: $31,460
  • Share making <$20k per year: 46.6%

Manufacturing

  • Average age: 43.7
  • Average salary: $56,264
  • Share making <$20k per year: 15.8%

Data in this section comes from DataUSA, using information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Census Bureau for 2014.

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AI

Ranked: The 20 Biggest Tech Companies by Market Cap

In total, the 20 biggest tech companies are worth over $20 trillion—nearly 18% of the stock market value globally.

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A portion of the top 20 biggest tech companies visualized as bubbles sized by market cap with Apple as the biggest.

Ranked: The 20 Biggest Tech Companies by Market Cap

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The world’s 20 biggest tech companies are worth over $20 trillion in total. To put this in perspective, this is nearly 18% of the stock market value globally.

This graphic shows which companies top the ranks, using data from Companiesmarketcap.com.

A Closer Look at The Top 20

Market capitalization (market cap) measures what a company is worth by taking the current share price and multiplying it by the number of shares outstanding. Here are the biggest tech companies according to their market cap on June 13, 2024.

RankCompanyCountry/RegionMarket Cap
1AppleU.S.$3.3T
2MicrosoftU.S.$3.3T
3NvidiaU.S.$3.2T
4AlphabetU.S.$2.2T
5AmazonU.S.$1.9T
6MetaU.S.$1.3T
7TSMCTaiwan$897B
8BroadcomU.S.$778B
9TeslaU.S.$582B
10TencentChina$453B
11ASMLNetherlands$415B
12OracleU.S.$384B
13SamsungSouth Korea$379B
14NetflixU.S.$281B
15AMDU.S.$258B
16QualcommU.S.$243B
17SAPGermany$225B
18SalesforceU.S.$222B
19PDD Holdings (owns Pinduoduo)China$212B
20AdobeU.S.$206B

Note: PDD Holdings says its headquarters remain in Shanghai, China, and Ireland is used for legal registration for its overseas business.

 

Apple is the largest tech company at the moment, having competed with Microsoft for the top of the leaderboard for many years. The company saw its market cap soar after announcing its generative AI, Apple Intelligence. Analysts believe people will upgrade their devices over the next few years, since the new features are only available on the iPhone 15 Pro or newer.

Microsoft is in second place in the rankings, partly thanks to enthusiasm for its AI software which is already generating revenue. Rising profits also contributed to the company’s value. For the quarter ended March 31, 2024, Microsoft increased its net income by 20% compared to the same quarter last year.

Nvidia follows closely behind with the third-highest market cap, rising more than eight times higher compared to its value at the start of 2023. The company has recently announced higher profits, introduced a higher dividend, and reported that its next-generation GPU chip will start generating revenue later this year.

AI a Driver of the Biggest Tech Companies

It’s clear from the biggest tech companies that involvement in AI can contribute to investor confidence.

Among S&P 500 companies, AI has certainly become a focus topic. In fact, 199 companies cited the term “AI” during their first quarter earnings calls, the highest on record. The companies who mentioned AI the most were Meta (95 times), Nvidia (86 times), and Microsoft (74 times).

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