Ranked: Top 10 Foreign Policy Concerns of Americans
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Ranked: Top 10 Foreign Policy Concerns of Americans

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U.S. Foreign Policy concerns

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The Briefing

  • Political leanings aside, terrorism remains a top issue of concern for Americans
  • Previous top issues, such as disinformation and U.S.–China relations, now rank lower

In the United States, there is a distinct difference on top foreign policy concerns between Democrats and Republicans.

This chart uses data from Morning Consult to assess the top policy concerns of Americans.

The Top Concerns

Overall, the average American is most concerned about terrorism, immigration, and drug trafficking. Interestingly, this list corresponds with the concerns of the average Republican, though falling in a different order.

Meanwhile, Democrats are chiefly worried about climate change, another global pandemic, and terrorism.

Here’s a breakdown of the policy concerns at large and across political parties.

Overall Rank with AmericansForeign Policy ConcernShare of Voters Listing it as a Top ConcernShare of Democrats Listing it as a Top ConcernShare of Republicans Listing it as a Top Concern
#1Terrorism49%38%62%
#2Immigration43%22%67%
#3Drug trafficking43%30%59%
#4Cyberattacks39%35%40%
#5Climate change38%54%17%
#6Preventing a global economic crisis32%33%31%
#7Securing critical supply chains30%27%34%
#8Preventing another global pandemic30%38%22%
#9Russia's invasion of Ukraine27%33%21%
#10Protecting human rights globally25%31%18%
#11Preventing disinformation24%29%21%
#12U.S.-China relations24%19%31%
#13Iran nuclear deal21%19%24%
#14Upholding democracy globally15%22%8%

Notably, the concern around U.S.-China relations ranks considerably low, as does preventing disinformation. Upholding democracy worldwide ranks extremely low with Republicans.

America’s Foreign Policy

Along party lines, the results are not surprising. Democrats skew towards multilateralism and want to engage with foreign bodies and other countries to tackle global issues. Republicans are generally more concerned with what’s happening at home.

Looking at the country as a whole and its relations with other nations, however, Americans lean more towards an America-first focus. According to Morning Consult, 39% of registered voters want to decrease U.S. involvement in other countries’ affairs, whereas 20% want to increase it; 30% want to keep the status quo.

Here’s a closer look at Americans’ desire to get involved in a variety of foreign policy initiatives:

IssueIncrease EffortsDecrease EffortsNeither
Overseas Troop Deployment21%37%30%
Trade and Tariffs41%15%29%
Involvement with International Organizations35%21%32%
Resolution of Military Disputes38%16%33%
Resolution of Economic Disputes43%13%31%

As of October 2022

The U.S. Midterm Elections

With midterm elections underway, America’s foreign policy may not be the most important factor for voters. Pew Research Center found that in these congressional elections, foreign policy only ranked 12th among other key issues considered “very important” by registered voters.

The top five concerns of voters in these midterms are:

  1. The economy
  2. The future of democracy within the U.S.
  3. Education
  4. Healthcare
  5. Energy policy

Regardless, the U.S. has a massive impact in foreign affairs and the results of the country’s midterm elections will likely cause a ripple effect globally. If Republicans win the House—which is looking extremely likely—and the Senate, President Biden’s foreign policy initiatives and priorities could be drastically restricted.

Where does this data come from?

Source: Morning Consult

Data notes: This ranking is made using the share of registered U.S. voters who identified the given issue as a top 5 concern for the country. For example, only 30% of registered voters said securing critical supply chains was a top 5 concern which is why it’s #7, whereas 43% said immigration was a top concern, ranking it at #2.

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Ranked: The World’s 20 Biggest Hedge Funds

This annual ranking shows the world’s largest hedge funds, which collectively hold an estimated $45 trillion in assets under management.

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The Briefing

  • Bridgewater Associates remains the top hedge fund by assets under management (AUM)
  • Brevan Howard witnessed strong growth in AUM, moving from 26th to 19th in the ranking

Ranked: The World’s 20 Biggest Hedge Funds

Collectively, the world’s 15,000 hedge funds manage around $4.5 trillion in assets for their clients, weathering economic storms and world events to ensure returns.

This visual breaks down the world’s biggest hedge funds in terms of assets under management using data from Pensions & Investments.

The Top 20

The world’s biggest hedge fund by a mile is Ray Dalio’s Bridgewater Associates. At the time of this ranking, Bridgewater managed over $126 billion in assets for clients as wide ranging as university endowment funds, charities, and foreign country’s central banks.

Here’s a closer look at the ranking:

RankHedge FundAssets (millions USD)Headquarters
#1Bridgewater Associates$126,400🇺🇸 U.S.
#2Man Group$73,500🇬🇧 UK
#3Renaissance Technologies$57,000🇺🇸 U.S.
#4Millennium Management$54,968🇺🇸 U.S.
#5Citadel$52,970🇺🇸 U.S.
#6D.E. Shaw Group$47,861🇺🇸 U.S.
#7Two Sigma Investments/Advisers$40,969🇺🇸 U.S.
#8Davidson Kempner Capital Management$37,450🇺🇸 U.S.
#9Farallon Capital Management$37,400🇺🇸 U.S.
#10TCI Fund Management$36,200🇬🇧 UK
#11Marshall Wace$34,400🇬🇧 UK
#12Ruffer$31,662🇬🇧 UK
#13AOR Capital Management$28,200🇺🇸 U.S.
#14Anchorage Capital Group$27,100🇺🇸 U.S.
#15Baupost Group$26,300🇺🇸 U.S.
#16Point72 Asset Management$26,100🇺🇸 U.S.
#17Capula Investment Management$25,000🇬🇧 UK
#18Wellington Management$24,968🇺🇸 U.S.
#19Brevan Howard Asset Management$23,353🇬🇧 UK
#20PIMCO$23,054🇺🇸 U.S.

This annual ranking uses AUM data from June 2022

Overall, 70% of hedge funds are headquartered in North America, with many of the world’s largest based in the United States, specifically.

ℹ️ Hedge funds are essentially pooled investments pulled together by the fund’s clients. The managers then utilize a variety of strategies to produce returns on investments, buying and selling assets such as stocks, commodities, real estate, bonds, and so on. The fund itself makes money by charging fees to their clients and taking a percentage of the profits earned on trading.

The Fastest Growing Hedge Funds

Many of these large hedge funds were new to the top 20 category, having moved up dramatically from the 2021 ranking. Here’s a look at some of the AUM growth rates year-over-year.

RankHedge FundGrowth in AUM (% Change Y-o-Y)
#1Brevan Howard Asset Management46.0%
#2Citadel40.8%
#3PIMCO25.3%
#4D.E. Shaw Group20.4%
#5Point72 Asset Management19.7%
#6Bridgewater Associates19.6%
#7Man Group15.9%
#8Wellington Management10.5%
#9AQR Capital Management8.0%
#10Millennium Management5.1%
#11Capula Investment Management4.6%
#12Marshall Wace3.9%
#13Two Sigma Investments/Advisers 3.6%
#14Davidson Kempner Capital Management0.3%
#15Renaissance Technologies-1.7%
#16Farallon Capital Management-1.8%
#17TCI Fund Management-9.5%
#18Anchorage Capital Group-12.8%
#19Baupost Group-15.2%
#20Ruffer-

UK-based Brevan Howard jumped from 26th to 19th, witnessing a 46% increase in their assets under management.

Hedge fund growth can be uncorrelated with the broader market, and is not necessarily an indicator of the overall economy. However, analyzing the strategies used by hedge funds and their performance can often provide useful insight for investors.

Where does this data come from?

Source: The Pensions & Investments annual ranking of largest hedge funds.

Source: This ranking uses AUM data from June 2022. This visualization can be used as a consistent snapshot of the size and proportionality of hedge funds. Current AUM for each may very.

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Disruptive Materials: Visualizing America’s Import Dependency

A handful of materials are increasingly crucial for the next generation of emerging technologies. But as the data shows, the U.S. is heavily reliant on foreign nations to supply these materials. (Sponsored)

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The Briefing

  • The U.S. is 100% import dependent on manganese and graphite
  • China and Canada are the two nations the U.S. is most import reliant on

America’s Import Dependency for Disruptive Materials

The U.S. is expected to see surging demand for disruptive materials, which are those deemed to have high level importance for their role in next generation technologies. But many of these disruptive materials like manganese, cobalt, and lithium are primarily imported from foreign countries.

This graphic from Global X ETFs takes a closer look at America’s reliance on net imports for these disruptive materials. Countries are ranked by how many commodities of which the U.S. is a net importer. And net importer is defined as over 50% of domestic use or consumption comes from foreign sources rather than domestic production.

Ranking Country Reliance

The U.S. imports commodities from a lot of countries, including from economic rivals. And these commodities include well known ones like nickel, zinc, and lithium, which are critical to climate-friendly technologies. However, the data reveals that there are a select number of countries where dependency is highest. Here’s a look at the top eight countries.

CountryNumber of Commodities Net Import Reliant
🇨🇳 China 19-23
🇨🇦 Canada13-18
🇷🇺 Russia 7-12
🇮🇳 India7-12
🇧🇷 Brazil7-12
🇿🇦 South Africa 7-12
🇩🇪 Germany7-12
🇲🇽 Mexico7-12

The U.S. is most dependent on China where they are net import reliant on 19-23 different commodities, followed by Canada with 13-18. In addition, the U.S. is 100% import reliant on manganese and graphite, and 76% import reliant on cobalt.

As these materials become increasingly important for AI, robotics, drone technology, as well as for climate infrastructure like solar panels and wind turbines, nations will desire to bolster their own supply chains and be less reliant on other countries. This may also accelerate due to the pandemic highlighting the fragility behind global supply chains.

Overall, this creates an environment where the market for disruptive materials will see extended periods of high demand and rising prices, otherwise known as a demand supercycle.

Introducing the Global X Disruptive Materials ETF

The Global X Disruptive Materials ETF (Ticker: DMAT) seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive Disruptive Materials Index.

To learn more about gaining exposure to the rising demand for disruptive materials, click here now.

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