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11 Leadership Styles That Will Hurt Your Business

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The starting place for developing an authentic leadership style is to make an extension of your best personality traits.

For example, if someone is a hard worker that likes to get in the trenches, this can be a key differentiator in how they run a particular organization. Likewise, abilities such as thinking big or being able to articulate a clear vision can also translate well in growing a successful team. Developing a leadership style this way is authentic and genuine, and it provides a helpful starting place for leading others.

However, good leaders know that they are not perfect, and that their own idiosyncrasies and insecurities also tend to shine through without them even recognizing it. In fact, often these shortcomings can even be amplified in unexpected ways within an organization, resulting in massive challenges and inefficiencies.

11 Ineffective Leadership Styles

A good leader knows that they must work hard to fix their own shortcomings, otherwise their team will never reach their full potential.

Today’s infographic comes to us from Colonial Life, and it shows 11 ineffective leadership styles that can have negative impacts on an organization’s productivity or culture.

11 Leadership Styles That Will Hurt Your Business

Shortcomings aren’t always obvious, and it can take some serious self-reflection to see the weaknesses in one’s leadership style.

Styles to Recognize and Avoid

Here’s a summation of the 11 types of leadership styles to avoid:

1. Micro Managing
Helping employees is one thing, but it’s also important to know when to take a step back. Over-management leads to an unempowered team.

2. Anything Goes
The opposite of micro management is also problematic as well. By letting everything fly, there is no order and it can lead to missing deadlines or low expectations.

3. Autocratic
In many situations, having just one person making the decisions can lead to employees carrying out projects that they disagree with or do not think will work.

4. The Charge-Ahead General
Charging ahead on every new project usually comes with a key weakness: a lack of patience. If managers continually get impatient with employees, it affect trust and respect within the organization.

5. Complete Self-Reliance
If a manager can’t trust others, then the work will pile up for that manager until it becomes unbearable. Meanwhile, employees have a tough time becoming independent in their roles.

6. Dictatorial
If decisions cannot be questioned, it leads to employees feeling like they are incapable or that they have no input.

7. Excessive Consistency
A manager with this leadership style has inflexible boundaries, and tends to be over-strict with employees. This can create resentment and lower motivation.

8. Mushroom Management
Severe lack of communications between management and employees leads to misunderstandings, confusion, and limited responsibility.

9. The Morale Buster
Criticism is important, but too much of it can hurt employee morale.

10. The Screamer
Too much expression of authority, or expressing it in unprofessional ways, can lead to a lack of respect between employees and management. There are other ways to articulate authority and constructive criticisms.

11. Seagull Management
Managers only interact with employees when there is a problem – this means employees never get praise or encouragement when it is needed.

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Business

Ranked: The 50 Most Innovative Companies

Companies need to adapt quickly to changing markets in order to thrive. Here’s a look at the top 50 most innovative companies in 2020.

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Ranked: the Top 50 Most Innovative Companies in 2020

Corporate longevity is on the decline. In the 1960s, a typical S&P 500 company was estimated to last more than 60 years—these days, the average lifespan is just 18 years.

In today’s fast-paced world, companies need to stay relevant in order to survive. Because of this, it’s become increasingly more important for businesses to prioritize innovation.

This chart looks at the top 50 most innovative companies in 2020, based on a survey by Boston Consulting Group (BCG). The companies have been ranked based on four variables:

  • Global “Mindshare”: The number of votes from all innovation executives.
  • Industry Peer Review: The number of votes from executives in a company’s industry.
  • Industry Disruption: A diversity index to measure votes across industries.
  • Value Creation: Total share return.

Breakdown of the Leaderboard

BCG has been ranking the most innovative companies since 2005. Here’s a look at the top 50 most innovative companies in 2020:

RankCompanyIndustryHQChange from 2019
1AppleTechnologyU.S.2
2AlphabetTechnologyU.S.-1
3AmazonConsumer GoodsU.S.-1
4MicrosoftTechnologyU.S.-
5SamsungTechnologySouth Korea-
6HuaweiTechnologyChina42
7AlibabaConsumer GoodsChina16
8IBMTechnologyU.S.-1
9SonyConsumer GoodsJapanreturn
10FacebookTechnologyU.S.-2
11TeslaTransportation & EnergyU.S.-2
12Cisco SystemsTechnologyU.S.5
13WalmartConsumer GoodsU.S.29
14TencentOtherChinareturn
15HP Inc.TechnologyU.S.29
16NikeConsumer GoodsU.S.return
17NetflixOtherU.S.-11
18LG ElectronicsConsumer GoodsSouth Korea-
19IntelTechnologyU.S.return
20DellTechnologyU.S.21
21SiemensOtherGermany-5
22TargetConsumer GoodsU.S.return
23PhilipsPharmaceuticals & MedtechNetherlands6
24XiaomiTechnologyChinareturn
25OracleTechnologyU.S.return
26Johnson & JohnsonPharmaceuticals & MedtechU.S.-12
27SAPTechnologyGermany1
28AdidasConsumer GoodsGermany-18
29HitachiTechnologyJapanreturn
30CostcoConsumer GoodsU.S.return
31JD.comConsumer GoodsChinanew
32VolkswagenTransportation & EnergyGermany6
33BoschTransportation & EnergyGermanynew
34AirbusTransportation & EnergyNetherlandsreturn
35SalesforceTechnologyU.S.-2
36JPMorgan ChaseOtherU.S.-16
37UberTechnologyU.S.return
38BayerPharmaceuticals & MedtechGermany-14
39Procter & GambleConsumer GoodsU.S.return
40Royal Dutch ShellTransportation & EnergyNetherlands-10
41ToyotaTransportation & EnergyJapan-4
42NestleConsumer GoodsSwitzerlandreturn
43ABBOtherSwitzerlandnew
443MOtherU.S.-5
45UnileverConsumer GoodsU.K.-13
46FCATransportation & EnergyU.K.new
47NovartisPharmaceuticals & MedtechSwitzerlandnew
48Coca-ColaConsumer GoodsU.S.return
49VolvoTransportation & EnergySwedennew
50McDonald’sConsumer GoodsU.S.-29

When you think about innovative companies, Walmart might not be top of mind. However, the retail giant has moved up to the 13th spot on the list, an increase of 29 places since 2019.

Walmart has put significant efforts into its e-commerce and omnichannel offerings. For instance, the company launched NextDay Delivery in 2020, and now offers one-day delivery to a majority of the U.S. population. The company also has a stake in the Chinese e-commerce platform JD.com, which has grown from 5% to 12%.

Costco makes it to 30th place this year, and the company is known for its effective use of data. Thanks to the company’s members-only model, it has been able to compile a ton of information on its customers. It uses this data not only for marketing purposes, but to help streamline processes like recall notices. Costco also uses data monitoring sensors in its warehouses to save money on water usage and to spot any potential leaks before they happen.

Another company worth touching on is Huawei—the Chinese tech company has taken the 6th spot, a 42 rank increase since 2019. This rise in the ranks is likely due to the company’s significant $19 billion investment in research and development (R&D) in 2019. These types of investments seem to be paying off, as Huawei sold more smartphones in 2019 than Apple.

Innovation Leaders Come in All Sizes

While people may picture startups when they think of innovation and adaptability, big firms aren’t lagging far behind when it comes to innovation output.

In this context, firms with new product sales above their industry median are considered “innovation leaders.” Although 52% of small firms are considered innovation leaders, 43% of large firms still find themselves in the same boat.

Small vs. big firms innovation leaders

In fact, because larger firms generally have more access to resources and manpower than smaller firms, they often have an advantage when it comes to research and development and the creation of innovation-focused programs.

Investing in innovation shows a far greater payoff down the line—firms that invested 1.4x more in innovation input saw 4x the amount of new products sales.

Innovation investment pays off

Innovation as a Lifestyle

Unless you’re in a startup that’s hoping to get acquired by a larger firm, innovation can’t be a one-hit-wonder. Yet, despite its importance, innovation over the long term is hard to maintain.

There have only been 8 companies that have appeared on the list every year. Here’s a look at the companies that have consistently made the cut since 2005:

These companies are serial innovators, and have managed to create innovation systems to perpetually foster creativity and agility. It’s an intentional, laborious process—but when done right, the payoff can be huge.

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Technology

The Future of Remote Work, According to Startups

In an in-depth survey, startup founders and their teams revealed work-from-home experiences and their plans for a post-pandemic future.

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No matter where in the world you log in from—Silicon Valley, London, and beyond—COVID-19 has triggered a mass exodus from traditional office life. Now that the lucky among us have settled into remote work, many are left wondering if this massive, inadvertent work-from-home experiment will change work for good.

In the following charts, we feature data from a comprehensive survey conducted by UK-based startup network Founders Forum, in which hundreds of founders and their teams revealed their experiences of remote work and their plans for a post-pandemic future.

While the future remains a blank page, it’s clear that hundreds of startups have no plans to hit backspace on remote work.

Who’s Talking

Based primarily in the UK, almost half of the survey participants were founders, and nearly a quarter were managers below the C-suite.

Prior to pandemic-related lockdowns, 94% of those surveyed had worked from an external office. Despite their brick-and-mortar setup, more than 90% were able to accomplish the majority of their work remotely.

Gen X and Millennials made up most of the survey contingent, with nearly 80% of respondents with ages between 26-50, and 40% in the 31-40 age bracket.

Founders Forum Remote Work Survey

From improved work-life balance and productivity levels to reduced formal teamwork, these entrepreneurs flagged some bold truths about what’s working and what’s not.

Founders With A Remote Vision

If history has taught us anything, it’s that world events have the potential to cause permanent mass change, like 9/11’s lasting impact on airport security.

Although most survey respondents had plans to be back in the office within six months, those startups are rethinking their remote work policies as a direct result of COVID-19.

How might that play out in a post-pandemic world?

Based on the startup responses, a realistic post-pandemic work scenario could involve 3 to 5 days of remote work a week, with a couple dedicated in-office days for the entire team.

Founders Forum Future of Remote Work Perspectives

Upwards of 92% of respondents said they wanted the option to work from home in some capacity.

It’s important to stay open to learning and experimenting with new ways of working. The current pandemic has only accelerated this process. We’ll see the other side of this crisis, and I’m confident it will be brighter.

— Evgeny Shadchnev, CEO, Makers Academy

Productivity Scales at Home

Working from home hasn’t slowed down these startups—in fact, it may have improved overall productivity in many cases.

More than half of the respondents were more productive from home, and 55% also reported working longer hours.

Founders Forum Remote Work Productivity

Blurred lines, however, raised some concerns.

From chores and rowdy children to extended hours, working from home often makes it difficult to compartmentalize. As a result, employers and employees may have to draw firmer lines between work and home in their remote policies, especially in the long term.

Although the benefits appear to outweigh the concerns, these issues pose important questions about our increasingly remote future.

Teams Reveal Some Intel

To uncover some work-from-home easter eggs (“Better for exercise. MUCH more pleasant environment”), we grouped nearly 400 open-ended questions according to sentiment and revealed some interesting patterns.

From serendipitous encounters and beers with colleagues to more formal teamwork, an overwhelming number of the respondents missed the camaraderie of team interactions.

Founders Forum Remote Entrepreneurs

It was clear startups did not miss the hours spent commuting every day. During the pandemic, those hours have been replaced by family time, work, or other activities like cooking healthy meals and working out.

Remote working has been great for getting us through lockdown—but truly creative work needs the magic of face to face interaction, not endless Zoom calls. Without the serendipity and chemistry of real-world encounters, the world will be a far less creative place.

— Rohan Silva, CEO, Second Home

The Future Looks Remote

This pandemic has delivered a new normal that’s simultaneously challenging and revealing. For now, it looks like a new way of working is being coded into our collective software.

What becomes of the beloved open-office plan in a pandemic-prepped world remains to be seen, but if these startups are any indication, work-life may have changed for good.

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