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Visualizing the Poverty Rate of Each U.S. State

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Visualizing the Poverty Rate of Each U.S. State

How many people live below the poverty line in states across the country?

Today’s interactive map comes to us from Overflow Solutions, and it visualizes the percentage of people living in poverty across the United States over the time period of 2008-2017.

U.S. Poverty Rates Today

To start, we’ll look at the situation using the most recent data, which was pulled from the American Community Survey (2017) done by the U.S. Census Bureau.

For additional context, it is worth noting that the national poverty level is estimated to sit at 13.4%.

Here are the five states with the highest levels of poverty today:

RankStatePoverty Rate (2017)
#1Mississippi19.8%
#2Louisiana19.7%
#3New Mexico19.7%
#4West Virginia19.1%
#5Kentucky17.2%

In three southern states, Mississippi, Louisiana, and New Mexico, nearly 20% of the population lives below the poverty line. Two Appalachian states round out the top five: West Virginia (19.1%) and Kentucky (17.2%).

On the flipside, here are the five states with the lowest levels of poverty:

RankStatePoverty Rate (2017)
#47Connecticut9.6%
#48 (t)Minnesota9.5%
#48 (t)Hawaii9.5%
#50Maryland9.3%
#51New Hampshire7.7%

New Hampshire (7.7%) has the lowest poverty rate by a long shot – about 1.6% lower than its closest competitor, which is the state of Maryland (9.3%).

Poverty Rates Over Time

While the data from 2017 provides an interesting snapshot, perhaps it is more insightful to look at the trend over time. In other words, are poverty rates increasing or decreasing?

Below is a comparison of state averages in 2008 (pre-crisis), 2012 (recent peak), and 2017:

200820122017
Avg. state poverty rate10.1%15.2%13.1%

Since the recent peak in 2012, poverty has decreased by an average of 2.1% per state – in fact, over the 2012-2017 time period, there were only three states that did not see a reduction in poverty levels: Alaska, Delaware, and West Virginia.

Using the longer time window, however, you’ll see that poverty rates have actually risen by 3.0% on average since 2008. Today, not a single state has a lower poverty rate than it did in 2008.

State Poverty Rates (All)

Finally, here’s a full state table that is sortable and searchable, showing poverty levels in 2008, 2012, and 2017, for your convenience:

200820122017
Alabama13.1%19.0%16.9%
Alaska6.1%10.1%11.1%
Arizona12.6%18.7%14.9%
Arkansas14.6%19.8%16.4%
California11.2%17.0%13.3%
Colorado9.0%13.7%10.3%
Connecticut7.0%10.7%9.6%
Delaware7.6%12.0%13.6%
District of Columbia15.4%18.2%16.6%
Florida10.7%17.1%14.0%
Georgia12.4%19.2%14.9%
Hawaii5.8%11.6%9.5%
Idaho9.9%15.9%12.8%
Illinois10.0%14.7%12.6%
Indiana10.6%15.6%13.5%
Iowa7.9%12.7%10.7%
Kansas8.4%14.0%11.9%
Kentucky14.4%19.4%17.2%
Louisiana14.8%19.9%19.7%
Maine8.7%14.7%11.1%
Maryland5.7%10.3%9.3%
Massachusetts7.0%11.9%10.5%
Michigan11.5%17.4%14.2%
Minnesota6.5%11.4%9.5%
Mississippi19.0%24.2%19.8%
Missouri10.6%16.2%13.4%
Montana11.5%15.5%12.5%
Nebraska7.6%13.0%10.8%
Nevada9.0%16.4%13.0%
New Hampshire4.9%10.0%7.7%
New Jersey6.7%10.8%10.0%
New Mexico14.7%20.8%19.7%
New York11.1%15.9%14.1%
North Carolina12.0%18.0%14.7%
North Dakota8.6%11.2%10.3%
Ohio10.5%16.3%14.0%
Oklahoma13.2%17.2%15.8%
Oregon10.5%17.2%13.2%
Pennsylvania9.2%13.7%12.5%
Rhode Island8.3%13.7%11.6%
South Carolina13.0%18.3%15.4%
South Dakota9.7%13.4%13.0%
Tennessee12.9%17.9%15.0%
Texas14.1%17.9%14.7%
Utah6.9%12.8%9.7%
Vermont6.5%11.8%11.3%
Virginia7.9%11.7%10.6%
Washington8.4%13.5%11.0%
West Virginia13.1%17.8%19.1%
Wisconsin7.3%13.2%11.3%
Wyoming6.1%12.6%11.3%
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Energy

Mapped: Renewable Energy and Battery Installations in the U.S. in 2023

This graphic describes new U.S. renewable energy installations by state along with nameplate capacity, planned to come online in 2023.

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Renewable and Battery Installations in the U.S. in 2023

This was originally posted on Elements. Sign up to the free mailing list to get beautiful visualizations on real assets and resource megatrends each week.

Renewable energy, in particular solar power, is set to shine in 2023. This year, the U.S. plans to get over 80% of its new energy installations from sources like battery, solar, and wind.

The above map uses data from EIA to highlight planned U.S. renewable energy and battery storage installations by state for 2023.

Total U.S. renewable energy and battery installations, broken down by share

Texas and California Leading in Renewable Energy

Nearly every state in the U.S. has plans to produce new clean energy in 2023, but it’s not a surprise to see the two most populous states in the lead of the pack.

Even though the majority of its power comes from natural gas, Texas currently leads the U.S. in planned renewable energy installations. The state also has plans to power nearly 900,000 homes using new wind energy.

California is second, which could be partially attributable to the passing of Title 24, an energy code that makes it compulsory for new buildings to have the equipment necessary to allow the easy installation of solar panels, battery storage, and EV charging.

New solar power in the U.S. isn’t just coming from places like Texas and California. In 2023, Ohio will add 1,917 MW of new nameplate solar capacity, with Nevada and Colorado not far behind.

Top 10 StatesBattery (MW)Solar (MW)Wind (MW)Total (MW)
Texas1,9816,4621,94110,385
California4,5554,2931238,970
Nevada6781,59602,274
Ohio121,91751,934
Colorado2301,1872001,617
New York585095591,125
Wisconsin4939921,034
Florida39780980
Kansas00843843
Illinois0363477840

The state of New York is also looking to become one of the nation’s leading renewable energy providers. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) is making real strides towards this objective with 11% of the nation’s new wind power projects expected to come online in 2023.

According to the data, New Hampshire is the only state in the U.S. that has no new utility-scale renewable energy installations planned for 2023. However, the state does have plans for a massive hydroelectric plant that should come online in 2024.

Decarbonizing Energy

Renewable energy is considered essential to reduce global warming and CO2 emissions.

In line with the efforts by each state to build new renewable installations, the Biden administration has set a goal of achieving a carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035 and a net zero emissions economy by no later than 2050.

The EIA forecasts the share of U.S. electricity generation from renewable sources rising from 22% in 2022 to 23% in 2023 and to 26% in 2024.

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