Visualized: Congestion at America's Busiest Port
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Visualizing Congestion at America’s Busiest Port

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Busiest Port

The Briefing

  • There are an estimated 540,000 shipping containers waiting in queue at the Port of Los Angeles
  • The port has been unable to keep up with increased shipments from overseas suppliers

The Busiest Port in America: Los Angeles

U.S. e-commerce grew by 32.4% in 2020—the highest annual growth rate in over two decades. Such rapid growth has resulted in many more goods being imported, leaving America’s western ports completely overwhelmed.

To help you understand the scale of this issue, we’ve visualized the number of containers waiting at sea in relation to the Port of Los Angeles’ daily processing capacity.

Stuck at Sea

As of November 2, 2021, the Port of Los Angeles reported that it had 93 vessels waiting in queue. Altogether, these ships have a maximum carrying capacity of roughly 540,000 containers (commonly measured in twenty-foot equivalent units or TEUs).

On the other side of the equation, the port processed 468,059 import containers in September (the most recent data at the time of writing). Because the port does not operate on Sundays, we can conclude that the port can load roughly 18,000 containers each day.

That capacity seems unlikely to reduce the congestion. Over a two-week timeframe in September, 407,695 containers arrived at the Port of Los Angeles, which averages to around 29,000 containers arriving each day.

FigureApproximate Number of Containers
Current backlog540,000
Daily import arrivals29,000
Daily import capacity18,000
Daily increase in backlog11,000

What’s Being Done?

Solutions are needed to prevent the backlog from causing massive economic harm. In fact, analysts believe that up to $90 billion in trade could be delayed this holiday season.

In October, the Biden administration announced a deal to expand operations at the Port of Los Angeles, enabling it to run 24/7. The port also announced it will begin charging carriers for every container that sits idle over a grace period. While only temporary, this plan has drawn criticism for its unclear objective.

“The fee is on the ocean carrier, but the control over when the cargo is to be picked up sits with the cargo recipient. Having the ocean carrier pay more does nothing to encourage the cargo interest to pick up the cargo.” – World Shipping Council

Regardless of the outcome, more permanent solutions will be required as online shopping continues to gain popularity.

Where does this data come from?

Source: Marine Exchange of Southern California, Port of Los Angeles, Freight Waves
Data Note: These figures are based on approximations and should not be interpreted as exact.
10/11/21 Update: This infographic was updated to include the number of import containers loaded by the neighboring Port of Long Beach.

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Ranked: The World’s 20 Biggest Hedge Funds

This annual ranking shows the world’s largest hedge funds, which collectively hold an estimated $45 trillion in assets under management.

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The Briefing

  • Bridgewater Associates remains the top hedge fund by assets under management (AUM)
  • Brevan Howard witnessed strong growth in AUM, moving from 26th to 19th in the ranking

Ranked: The World’s 20 Biggest Hedge Funds

Collectively, the world’s 15,000 hedge funds manage around $4.5 trillion in assets for their clients, weathering economic storms and world events to ensure returns.

This visual breaks down the world’s biggest hedge funds in terms of assets under management using data from Pensions & Investments.

The Top 20

The world’s biggest hedge fund by a mile is Ray Dalio’s Bridgewater Associates. At the time of this ranking, Bridgewater managed over $126 billion in assets for clients as wide ranging as university endowment funds, charities, and foreign country’s central banks.

Here’s a closer look at the ranking:

RankHedge FundAssets (millions USD)Headquarters
#1Bridgewater Associates$126,400🇺🇸 U.S.
#2Man Group$73,500🇬🇧 UK
#3Renaissance Technologies$57,000🇺🇸 U.S.
#4Millennium Management$54,968🇺🇸 U.S.
#5Citadel$52,970🇺🇸 U.S.
#6D.E. Shaw Group$47,861🇺🇸 U.S.
#7Two Sigma Investments/Advisers$40,969🇺🇸 U.S.
#8Davidson Kempner Capital Management$37,450🇺🇸 U.S.
#9Farallon Capital Management$37,400🇺🇸 U.S.
#10TCI Fund Management$36,200🇬🇧 UK
#11Marshall Wace$34,400🇬🇧 UK
#12Ruffer$31,662🇬🇧 UK
#13AOR Capital Management$28,200🇺🇸 U.S.
#14Anchorage Capital Group$27,100🇺🇸 U.S.
#15Baupost Group$26,300🇺🇸 U.S.
#16Point72 Asset Management$26,100🇺🇸 U.S.
#17Capula Investment Management$25,000🇬🇧 UK
#18Wellington Management$24,968🇺🇸 U.S.
#19Brevan Howard Asset Management$23,353🇬🇧 UK
#20PIMCO$23,054🇺🇸 U.S.

This annual ranking uses AUM data from June 2022

Overall, 70% of hedge funds are headquartered in North America, with many of the world’s largest based in the United States, specifically.

ℹ️ Hedge funds are essentially pooled investments pulled together by the fund’s clients. The managers then utilize a variety of strategies to produce returns on investments, buying and selling assets such as stocks, commodities, real estate, bonds, and so on. The fund itself makes money by charging fees to their clients and taking a percentage of the profits earned on trading.

The Fastest Growing Hedge Funds

Many of these large hedge funds were new to the top 20 category, having moved up dramatically from the 2021 ranking. Here’s a look at some of the AUM growth rates year-over-year.

RankHedge FundGrowth in AUM (% Change Y-o-Y)
#1Brevan Howard Asset Management46.0%
#2Citadel40.8%
#3PIMCO25.3%
#4D.E. Shaw Group20.4%
#5Point72 Asset Management19.7%
#6Bridgewater Associates19.6%
#7Man Group15.9%
#8Wellington Management10.5%
#9AQR Capital Management8.0%
#10Millennium Management5.1%
#11Capula Investment Management4.6%
#12Marshall Wace3.9%
#13Two Sigma Investments/Advisers 3.6%
#14Davidson Kempner Capital Management0.3%
#15Renaissance Technologies-1.7%
#16Farallon Capital Management-1.8%
#17TCI Fund Management-9.5%
#18Anchorage Capital Group-12.8%
#19Baupost Group-15.2%
#20Ruffer-

UK-based Brevan Howard jumped from 26th to 19th, witnessing a 46% increase in their assets under management.

Hedge fund growth can be uncorrelated with the broader market, and is not necessarily an indicator of the overall economy. However, analyzing the strategies used by hedge funds and their performance can often provide useful insight for investors.

Where does this data come from?

Source: The Pensions & Investments annual ranking of largest hedge funds.

Source: This ranking uses AUM data from June 2022. This visualization can be used as a consistent snapshot of the size and proportionality of hedge funds. Current AUM for each may very.

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Disruptive Materials: Visualizing America’s Import Dependency

A handful of materials are increasingly crucial for the next generation of emerging technologies. But as the data shows, the U.S. is heavily reliant on foreign nations to supply these materials. (Sponsored)

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The Briefing

  • The U.S. is 100% import dependent on manganese and graphite
  • China and Canada are the two nations the U.S. is most import reliant on

America’s Import Dependency for Disruptive Materials

The U.S. is expected to see surging demand for disruptive materials, which are those deemed to have high level importance for their role in next generation technologies. But many of these disruptive materials like manganese, cobalt, and lithium are primarily imported from foreign countries.

This graphic from Global X ETFs takes a closer look at America’s reliance on net imports for these disruptive materials. Countries are ranked by how many commodities of which the U.S. is a net importer. And net importer is defined as over 50% of domestic use or consumption comes from foreign sources rather than domestic production.

Ranking Country Reliance

The U.S. imports commodities from a lot of countries, including from economic rivals. And these commodities include well known ones like nickel, zinc, and lithium, which are critical to climate-friendly technologies. However, the data reveals that there are a select number of countries where dependency is highest. Here’s a look at the top eight countries.

CountryNumber of Commodities Net Import Reliant
🇨🇳 China 19-23
🇨🇦 Canada13-18
🇷🇺 Russia 7-12
🇮🇳 India7-12
🇧🇷 Brazil7-12
🇿🇦 South Africa 7-12
🇩🇪 Germany7-12
🇲🇽 Mexico7-12

The U.S. is most dependent on China where they are net import reliant on 19-23 different commodities, followed by Canada with 13-18. In addition, the U.S. is 100% import reliant on manganese and graphite, and 76% import reliant on cobalt.

As these materials become increasingly important for AI, robotics, drone technology, as well as for climate infrastructure like solar panels and wind turbines, nations will desire to bolster their own supply chains and be less reliant on other countries. This may also accelerate due to the pandemic highlighting the fragility behind global supply chains.

Overall, this creates an environment where the market for disruptive materials will see extended periods of high demand and rising prices, otherwise known as a demand supercycle.

Introducing the Global X Disruptive Materials ETF

The Global X Disruptive Materials ETF (Ticker: DMAT) seeks to provide investment results that correspond generally to the price and yield performance, before fees and expenses, of the Solactive Disruptive Materials Index.

To learn more about gaining exposure to the rising demand for disruptive materials, click here now.

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