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Visualizing India’s Top Companies by Market Capitalization

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Visualizing India's Top Companies by Market Capitalization

Visualizing India’s Top Companies by Market Capitalization

India’s stock market valuation hit $4 trillion in 2023 for the first time ever, bringing the world’s fifth-biggest equity market closer to Hong Kong, which is worth around $4.7 trillion.

This graphic, utilizing data from CompaniesMarketCap, showcases India’s top 50 publicly traded companies by market capitalization.

India’s Biggest Companies Worth Over $2 Trillion

Altogether, the 50 biggest companies in India are worth over $2.1 trillion, or ₹180 trillion in Indian Rupees.

At the top is the multinational conglomerate Reliance Industries. The company operates in diverse sectors, including energy, petrochemicals, natural gas, retail, telecommunications, mass media, and textiles. Additionally, it holds the rank of the 100th largest company worldwide.

Reliance’s Chairman and Managing Director, Mukesh Ambani, is India’s richest person with a net worth of $95.6 billion. The company was founded by his late father Dhirubhai Ambani, a yarn trader, in 1966 as a small textile manufacturer.

CompanyIndustryMarket Cap (USD)
Reliance IndustriesConglomerate$198 billion
HDFC BankBanking$159 billion
Tata Consultancy ServicesInformation Technology$155 billion
ICICI BankBanking$85.4 billion
Bharti AirtelInformation Technology$72.5 billion
Hindustan UnileverConsumer Staples$72.3 billion
InfosysInformation Technology$72.3 billion
ITCConglomerate$67.6 billion
State Bank of IndiaBanking$65.2 billion
Housing Development Finance CorpBanking$60.7 billion
Larsen & ToubroConglomerate$54.7 billion
Bajaj FinanceFinancial Services & Real Estate$54.5 billion
Life Insurance Corporation of IndiaFinancial Services & Real Estate$54.2 billion
Kotak Mahindra BankBanking$43.6 billion
HCL TechnologiesInformation Technology$42.8 billion
Axis BankBanking$41.9 billion
Adani EnterprisesConglomerate$40.5 billion
Maruti Suzuki IndiaAutomotive$40.5 billion
Titan CompanyConsumer Discretionary$37.9 billion
Asian PaintsConsumer Discretionary$37.1 billion
Sun PharmaceuticalOther$35.7 billion
NTPC LimitedEnergy & Mining$33.2 billion
Bajaj FinservFinancial Services & Real Estate$32.3 billion
UltraTech CementIndustrial$32.3 billion
DMartConsumer Staples$31.6 billion
Tata MotorsAutomotive$31.2 billion
Oil & Natural Gas (ONGC)Energy & Mining$30.5 billion
Nestlé IndiaConsumer Staples$28.5 billion
Coal IndiaEnergy & Mining$26.3 billion
Adani Ports & SEZOther$26.3 billion
Adani Green EnergyEnergy & Mining$25.6 billion
WiproInformation Technology$25.4 billion
Mahindra & MahindraAutomotive$25.2 billion
Adani PowerEnergy & Mining$24.9 billion
Powergrid Corporation of IndiaEnergy & Mining$24.8 billion
JSW SteelIndustrial$24 billion
Bajaj AutoAutomotive$20.9 billion
Hindustan AeronauticsOther$20.5 billion
Indian OilEnergy & Mining$20 billion
Tata SteelIndustrial$19.6 billion
LTIMindtreeInformation Technology$19.5 billion
DLFFinancial Services & Real Estate$19.3 billion
SBI Life InsuranceFinancial Services & Real Estate$17.6 billion
HDFC LifeFinancial Services & Real Estate$17.4 billion
Varun BeveragesConsumer Staples$16.6 billion
Hindustan ZincEnergy & Mining$16.5 billion
Siemens IndiaConglomerate$16.4 billion
Grasim IndustriesConglomerate$16.4 billion
PidiliteIndustrial$15.7 billion
Power Finance CorpFinancial Services & Real Estate$14.9 billion

In second place is India’s largest private sector bank by assets and the world’s fifth-largest bank by market capitalization, HDFC Bank. The institution employs over 177,000 people.

Furthermore, in third place is IT company Tata Consultancy Services, which provides services in cloud, cognitive business operations, consulting, and cybersecurity in 55 countries, including the U.S., Canada, China, Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

In total, IT comprises six of India’s 50 biggest companies. The list also includes 16 financial and banking groups and spans other sectors such as mining and energy, automotive, and consumer staples.

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U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

U.S. debt interest payments have surged past the $1 trillion dollar mark, amid high interest rates and an ever-expanding debt burden.

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This line chart shows U.S. debt interest payments over modern history.

U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The cost of paying for America’s national debt crossed the $1 trillion dollar mark in 2023, driven by high interest rates and a record $34 trillion mountain of debt.

Over the last decade, U.S. debt interest payments have more than doubled amid vast government spending during the pandemic crisis. As debt payments continue to soar, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reported that debt servicing costs surpassed defense spending for the first time ever this year.

This graphic shows the sharp rise in U.S. debt payments, based on data from the Federal Reserve.

A $1 Trillion Interest Bill, and Growing

Below, we show how U.S. debt interest payments have risen at a faster pace than at another time in modern history:

DateInterest PaymentsU.S. National Debt
2023$1.0T$34.0T
2022$830B$31.4T
2021$612B$29.6T
2020$518B$27.7T
2019$564B$23.2T
2018$571B$22.0T
2017$493B$20.5T
2016$460B$20.0T
2015$435B$18.9T
2014$442B$18.1T
2013$425B$17.2T
2012$417B$16.4T
2011$433B$15.2T
2010$400B$14.0T
2009$354B$12.3T
2008$380B$10.7T
2007$414B$9.2T
2006$387B$8.7T
2005$355B$8.2T
2004$318B$7.6T
2003$294B$7.0T
2002$298B$6.4T
2001$318B$5.9T
2000$353B$5.7T
1999$353B$5.8T
1998$360B$5.6T
1997$368B$5.5T
1996$362B$5.3T
1995$357B$5.0T
1994$334B$4.8T
1993$311B$4.5T
1992$306B$4.2T
1991$308B$3.8T
1990$298B$3.4T
1989$275B$3.0T
1988$254B$2.7T
1987$240B$2.4T
1986$225B$2.2T
1985$219B$1.9T
1984$205B$1.7T
1983$176B$1.4T
1982$157B$1.2T
1981$142B$1.0T
1980$113B$930.2B
1979$96B$845.1B
1978$84B$789.2B
1977$69B$718.9B
1976$61B$653.5B
1975$55B$576.6B
1974$50B$492.7B
1973$45B$469.1B
1972$39B$448.5B
1971$36B$424.1B
1970$35B$389.2B
1969$30B$368.2B
1968$25B$358.0B
1967$23B$344.7B
1966$21B$329.3B

Interest payments represent seasonally adjusted annual rate at the end of Q4.

At current rates, the U.S. national debt is growing by a remarkable $1 trillion about every 100 days, equal to roughly $3.6 trillion per year.

As the national debt has ballooned, debt payments even exceeded Medicaid outlays in 2023—one of the government’s largest expenditures. On average, the U.S. spent more than $2 billion per day on interest costs last year. Going further, the U.S. government is projected to spend a historic $12.4 trillion on interest payments over the next decade, averaging about $37,100 per American.

Exacerbating matters is that the U.S. is running a steep deficit, which stood at $1.1 trillion for the first six months of fiscal 2024. This has accelerated due to the 43% increase in debt servicing costs along with a $31 billion dollar increase in defense spending from a year earlier. Additionally, a $30 billion increase in funding for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in light of the regional banking crisis last year was a major contributor to the deficit increase.

Overall, the CBO forecasts that roughly 75% of the federal deficit’s increase will be due to interest costs by 2034.

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