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Visualizing the Countries With the Highest Corporate Tax Rates

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See this visualization first on the Voronoi app.

This circie graphic shows the countries with the highest corporate tax rate in 2023.

Countries With the Highest Corporate Tax Rate Around the World

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

In 1980, the global average corporate tax rate stood at 40.2%—a level notably higher than today.

Over the last several decades, corporate tax rates have declined across every region, with the average now falling at 23.5% as of 2023. As tax rates have sunk lower, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and others have called for a global minimum corporate tax to prevent multinationals from sheltering profits in tax havens.

But on the other hand, some argue that lower corporate rates allow corporations to report more income and boost real business activities.

The above graphic, from Pranav Gavali, shows the countries with the highest corporate tax rates since 1980.

What are the Top 10 Countries by Corporate Tax Rates?

Below, we show how countries with the highest corporate taxes have changed over the last four decades, based on data from the Tax Foundation:

RankCountryCorporate Tax Rate
2023
CountryCorporate Tax Rate
1980
1🇰🇲 Comoros50.0%🇬🇭 Ghana60.0%
2🇵🇷 Puerto Rico37.5%🇮🇳 India60.0%
3🇸🇷 Suriname36.0%🇨🇳 China55.2%
4🇦🇷 Argentina35.0%🇵🇰 Pakistan55.0%
5🇹🇩 Chad35.0%🇵🇪 Peru55.0%
6🇨🇴 Colombia35.0%🇦🇹 Austria55.0%
7🇨🇺 Cuba35.0%🇬🇧 United Kingdom52.0%
8🇬🇶 Equatorial Guinea35.0%🇨🇩 DRC50.0%
9🇲🇹 Malta35.0%🇫🇷 France50.0%
10🇸🇩 Sudan35.0%🇰🇼 Kuwait50.0%

As the above table shows, countries clustered in Africa and South America have the top rates globally.

Argentina, with a corporate tax rate of 35%, hiked up rates from 25% in 2022 as the country was mired in a deepening economic crisis. The country has also been a key supporter of a global minimum tax, suggesting it should be raised as high as 25%.

Malta, the only European nation on the list, also has one of the highest rates. Yet its tax system is complex: local businesses pay a 35% rate on profits, but international firms can pay as low as 5% in Malta with an additional 10% tax paid in their originating country.

By contrast, we can see that in 1980, countries including India, China and the United Kingdom had corporate tax rates above 50%. Since then, China underwent a series of economic reforms that included key tax reductions that helped drive the growth of its private sector.

In the United Kingdom, tax rates were 52% four decades ago and now fall at 25%. The U.S. tells a similar story, with corporate rates standing at 46% in 1980—more than double the rates seen today. Major corporate tax cuts were seen during Reagan’s presidency during the 1980s, when rates were cut to 35%, and later in 2017 when they were further reduced to 21% under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

U.S. debt interest payments have surged past the $1 trillion dollar mark, amid high interest rates and an ever-expanding debt burden.

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This line chart shows U.S. debt interest payments over modern history.

U.S. Debt Interest Payments Reach $1 Trillion

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The cost of paying for America’s national debt crossed the $1 trillion dollar mark in 2023, driven by high interest rates and a record $34 trillion mountain of debt.

Over the last decade, U.S. debt interest payments have more than doubled amid vast government spending during the pandemic crisis. As debt payments continue to soar, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) reported that debt servicing costs surpassed defense spending for the first time ever this year.

This graphic shows the sharp rise in U.S. debt payments, based on data from the Federal Reserve.

A $1 Trillion Interest Bill, and Growing

Below, we show how U.S. debt interest payments have risen at a faster pace than at another time in modern history:

DateInterest PaymentsU.S. National Debt
2023$1.0T$34.0T
2022$830B$31.4T
2021$612B$29.6T
2020$518B$27.7T
2019$564B$23.2T
2018$571B$22.0T
2017$493B$20.5T
2016$460B$20.0T
2015$435B$18.9T
2014$442B$18.1T
2013$425B$17.2T
2012$417B$16.4T
2011$433B$15.2T
2010$400B$14.0T
2009$354B$12.3T
2008$380B$10.7T
2007$414B$9.2T
2006$387B$8.7T
2005$355B$8.2T
2004$318B$7.6T
2003$294B$7.0T
2002$298B$6.4T
2001$318B$5.9T
2000$353B$5.7T
1999$353B$5.8T
1998$360B$5.6T
1997$368B$5.5T
1996$362B$5.3T
1995$357B$5.0T
1994$334B$4.8T
1993$311B$4.5T
1992$306B$4.2T
1991$308B$3.8T
1990$298B$3.4T
1989$275B$3.0T
1988$254B$2.7T
1987$240B$2.4T
1986$225B$2.2T
1985$219B$1.9T
1984$205B$1.7T
1983$176B$1.4T
1982$157B$1.2T
1981$142B$1.0T
1980$113B$930.2B
1979$96B$845.1B
1978$84B$789.2B
1977$69B$718.9B
1976$61B$653.5B
1975$55B$576.6B
1974$50B$492.7B
1973$45B$469.1B
1972$39B$448.5B
1971$36B$424.1B
1970$35B$389.2B
1969$30B$368.2B
1968$25B$358.0B
1967$23B$344.7B
1966$21B$329.3B

Interest payments represent seasonally adjusted annual rate at the end of Q4.

At current rates, the U.S. national debt is growing by a remarkable $1 trillion about every 100 days, equal to roughly $3.6 trillion per year.

As the national debt has ballooned, debt payments even exceeded Medicaid outlays in 2023—one of the government’s largest expenditures. On average, the U.S. spent more than $2 billion per day on interest costs last year. Going further, the U.S. government is projected to spend a historic $12.4 trillion on interest payments over the next decade, averaging about $37,100 per American.

Exacerbating matters is that the U.S. is running a steep deficit, which stood at $1.1 trillion for the first six months of fiscal 2024. This has accelerated due to the 43% increase in debt servicing costs along with a $31 billion dollar increase in defense spending from a year earlier. Additionally, a $30 billion increase in funding for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in light of the regional banking crisis last year was a major contributor to the deficit increase.

Overall, the CBO forecasts that roughly 75% of the federal deficit’s increase will be due to interest costs by 2034.

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