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Billionaire Wealth: The Biggest Winners and Losers in 2023

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See this visualization first on the Voronoi app.

This scatterplot chart shows changes in billionaire wealth in 2023.

Billionaire Wealth: The Biggest Winners and Losers in 2023

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

In early February, Mark Zuckerberg added $28 billion to his wealth in a matter of hours as Meta’s shares soared after the company announced its first dividend payout.

This follows a banner year for the Facebook founder, who saw his wealth surge 173% in 2023. Like Zuckerberg, many tech billionaires added huge sums to their wealth as the stock market rebounded.

This graphic, from Preyash Shah, shows the biggest winners and losers in billionaire wealth in 2023.

The Top Risers and Fallers

Below, we rank the world’s top 50 billionaires by their net change in wealth:

RankingNameNet Worth 2024Annual Change% Growth
1Elon Musk$250.4B$113.5B+83%
2Mark Zuckerberg$123.6B$78.3B+173%
3Jeff Bezos$174.4B$65.3B+60%
4Prajogo Pangestu$54.6B$49.5B+971%
5Larry Page$116.2B$38.1B+49%
6Sergey Brin$111.5B$36.6B+49%
7Amancio Ortega$99.4B$34.8B+54%
8Steve Ballmer$110.9B$32.4B+41%
9Larry Ellison$133.8B$30.0B+29%
10Jensen Huang$42.9B$29.4B+218%
11Françoise Bettencourt
Meyers & family
$98.1B$26.1B+36%
12Colin Huang$51.6B$21.8B+73%
13Carlos Slim Helu
& family
$102.9B$21.0B+26%
14Bernard Arnault
& family
$203.2B$20.2B+11%
15Michael Bloomberg$96.3B$19.5B+25%
16Reinhold Wuerth
& family
$30.7B$16.7B+119%
17Michael Dell$67.9B$15.4B+29%
18MacKenzie Scott$40.8B$15.3B+60%
19Gianluigi & Rafaela
Aponte
$29.7B$15.2B+105%
20Bill Gates$118.3B$15.1B+15%
21Dieter Schwarz$48.8B$14.3B+41%
22Stephen Schwarzman$37.7B$12.6B+50%
23Warren Buffett$118.8B$11.1B+10%
24Shiv Nadar$32.5B$8.6B+36%
25Mukesh Ambani$97.8B$8.0B+9%
26David Thomson
& family
$59.7B$6.8B+13%
27Tadashi Yanai
& family
$37.8B$6.5B+21%
28Ken Griffin$37.7B$6.4B+20%
29Klaus-Michael
Kuehne
$34.1B$5.2B+18%
30Giovanni Ferrero$40.0B$5.2B+15%
31Rob Walton$64.3B$4.2B+7%
32Jim Walton$65.0B$3.6B+6%
33Gerard Wertheimer$36.3B$3.1B+9%
34Alain Wertheimer$36.3B$3.1B+9%
35Jim Simons$30.7B$2.6B+9%
36Li Ka-shing$35.6B$2.2B+7%
37Zhong Shanshan$65.4B$2.0B-3%
38Julia Koch
& family
$59.2B$1.5B+3%
39Phil Knight
& family
$46.8B$1.3B+3%
40Alice Walton$60.0B$0.8B+1%
41Miriam Adelson
& family
$32.2B$0.1B+0%
42Jacqueline Mars$38.2B-$0.4B-1%
43John Mars$38.2B-$0.4B-1%
44Jeff Yass$28.9B-$1.1B-4%
45Len Blavatnik$31.5B-$2.2B-7%
46François Pinault
& family
$31.8B-$2.8B-8%
47Ma Huateng$34.0B-$3.3B-9%
48Charles Koch$53.9B-$3.8B-7%
49Zhang Yiming$43.4B-$6.1B-12%
50Gautam Adani$69.7B-$56.5B-45%

Adding $113.5 billion to his fortune, Elon Musk saw the biggest gains across the group as Tesla shares doubled in price in 2023.

This marks a sharp reversal from the previous year, when Musk lost more money than any other billionaire. In a record year, Tesla delivered 1.8 million vehicles—a 38% year-over-year increase.

Mark Zuckerberg, with the second-highest gains, raked in $78.3 billion as Meta’s shares skyrocketed. Last year, Facebook saw 5 million new users in North America. Adding to this, users’ time spent on Instagram has increased 40% since mid-2020 when Reels was launched.

As the fastest riser across the top 50, Indonesia’s energy billionaire Prajogo Pangestu saw his wealth climb an incredible 971%. The majority of gains were driven from Barito Renewables, his geothermal power company, going public in October 2023.

By contrast, India’s Gautam Adani saw the steepest decline in wealth. After a Hindenburg report accused the Adani Group of operating several shell companies to manipulate stock prices and launder money, Adani saw his wealth decline by $56.5 billion, cutting it by almost half.

Along with Adani, Zhang Yiming, the founder of ByteDance—known for its social media app TikTok—lost $6.1 billion while major Republican donor Charles Koch lost $3.8 billion over the year.

Rapidly Changing Wealth

So far, the U.S. stock market has hit record highs in 2024, boosting the fortunes of many of the world’s billionaires.

In fact, Meta recently added $196 billion to its market cap in one day, the biggest gain in the history of Wall Street. Year-to-date, Zuckerberg’s wealth has increased by $38.2 billion as of February 5. Additionally, Jeff Bezos has added $18 billion to his net worth in just over a month as Amazon shares have jumped nearly 14%.

In 2024, Warren Buffett’s net worth has already climbed by $9.9 billion.

Other billionaires have not fared as well, in particular Elon Musk, whose wealth has plummeted $55.8 billion after issuing recalls for 3.8 million vehicles. Tesla’s shares have slumped 27% year-to-date given production headwinds and a host of other setbacks, including legal troubles and increasing competition in the electric vehicle market.

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Money

Mapping Credit Card Delinquency Rates in the U.S. by State

Which states have the lowest credit card delinquency rates in America, and which have the highest?

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mapping credit card delinquency rates in the U.S.

Credit Card Delinquency Rates in the U.S. by State

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Credit card debt carries a hefty bill in America, and falling behind on payments can be extremely costly for cardholders.

This graphic shows credit card delinquency rates across 50 U.S. states, as of Q3 2023. This data comes from a WalletHub study published in January 2024.

Which States Have the Lowest and Highest Delinquency Rates?

Credit card delinquency is when a cardholder falls behind on required monthly payments. Credit agencies are often notified after two months of delinquent payments.

WalletHub examined proprietary user data on the average number of delinquent credit card tradelines—also known as credit accounts—across states. Here they are from lowest to highest:

RankStateShare of Credit Card
Tradelines Delinquent (%)
1Iowa12.9
2Massachusetts13.9
3Hawaii13.9
4Rhode Island14.7
5Washington14.7
6Florida14.8
7New York14.9
8California15.1
9New Hampshire15.5
10Alaska15.6
11New Jersey15.6
12Colorado15.7
13Utah15.8
14Vermont16.1
15Montana16.1
16Illinois16.5
17Oregon16.6
18Idaho17.0
19Ohio17.5
20Connecticut17.8
21Maine18.0
22Nebraska18.1
23Wyoming18.1
24Maryland18.4
25Kansas18.4
26Wisconsin18.5
27Virginia18.7
28Nevada19.1
29South Dakota19.3
30Arizona19.8
31Minnesota19.8
32Pennsylvania20.2
33Michigan20.9
34North Dakota21.3
35Delaware21.4
36Missouri22.4
37New Mexico22.6
38Georgia23.1
39North Carolina24.0
40Indiana24.3
41Texas24.7
42West Virginia25.2
43Tennessee26.2
44South Carolina26.9
45Kentucky27.6
46Oklahoma28.2
47Arkansas30.1
48Alabama30.5
49Louisiana31.7
50Mississippi39.1

No state had credit delinquency rates of less than 10%, with Iowa coming the closest at 12.9%.

That puts Iowa ahead of wealthier states like Massachusetts (13.9%), Washington (14.7%), and New Hampshire (15.5%).

At the bottom end was Mississippi, which had 39% credit delinquency rates to end 2023. That’s well ahead of the next-lowest states Louisiana (31.7%) and Alabama (30.5%).

It’s notable that the American South had higher rates of delinquency almost across the board. The five states with the highest rates of credit card delinquency are all located in the southeastern region of the country, and Texas had a higher delinquency rate (25%) than other majorly populated states like Florida (14.8%) and New York (14.9%).

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