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Mapped: The Top U.S. Imports by State

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Map of the most common import in each U.S. state

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Mapped: The Top U.S. Imports by State

In 2021, the U.S. brought in approximately $2.83 trillion worth of goods from its various international trading partners.

But what types of goods are most commonly imported throughout different parts of America? This graphic by OnDeck shows the top import in every U.S. state, using January 2022 data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Most Popular Categories of U.S. Imports

Petroleum is the most popular import in 12 states, making it the most common import across America. In 2021, about 72% of imported petroleum was crude oil, which was then domestically refined into products like gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel.

StateTop Import
AlabamaPetroleum
AlaskaPetroleum
ArizonaAircraft
ArkansasAircraft
CaliforniaVehicles
ColoradoPetroleum
ConnecticutSilver
DelawareMedicine
FloridaNucleic Acids
GeorgiaVehicles
HawaiiPetroleum
IdahoData Processing Parts
IllinoisTelephones
IndianaMedicine
IowaRoad Tractors
KansasAircraft
KentuckyVaccines and Antibodies
LouisianaPetroleum
MaineLight Oils
MarylandVehicles
MassachusettsLight Oils
MichiganVehicles
MinnesotaPetroleum
MississippiPetroleum
MissouriPetroleum
MontanaPetroleum
NebraskaNucleic Acids
NevadaElectrical Processors
New HampshireAircraft
New JerseyMedicine
New MexicoData Processing Parts
New YorkPrecious Metal
North CarolinaVaccines and Antibodies
North DakotaPlatinum
OhioMedicine
OklahomaPetroleum
OregonSemiconductor Machines
PennsylvaniaMedicine
Rhode IslandVehicles
South CarolinaUranium
South DakotaCow Meat
TennesseeMedicine
TexasPetroleum
UtahGold
VermontElectrical Energy
VirginiaPrinter Parts
WashingtonVehicles
West VirginiaAircraft
WisconsinVaccines
WyomingPetroleum

A majority of that imported petroleum came from Canada, while roughly 11% was imported from OPEC countries, and 8% came from Russia. Of course, the latter figure will likely dip in 2022 because of the ban on Russian imports implemented by the Biden administration in response to the Russia-Ukraine conflict.

After petroleum, vehicles and medicine were tied for the second most-imported goods, with both categories being the most popular import in six states each.

Somewhat related to medicine are nucleic acids, which were the top imports in Florida and Nebraska. Nucleic acids are natural polymers that are used in biological processes like protein synthesis or messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. It’s worth noting that several COVID-19 vaccines, including those produced by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech, are mRNA vaccines.

The Most Unique U.S. Imports

In addition to outlining the most popular imports in each U.S. state, OnDeck highlights each state’s most unique import, visualized in the graphic below.

OnDeck defines each state’s “most unique” import as the category of goods that was imported by the fewest other states.

Salmon was Florida’s most unique import. This makes sense considering the Sunshine State is home to some of the country’s biggest seafood wholesalers, including North Star Seafood (owned by Sysco) and Tampa Bay Fisheries.

Another example is Delaware’s high imports of pineapples, totaling around $60.2 million in pineapples per year. This time, the culprit is Dole plc (formerly the Dole Food Company), the largest producer of fruit and vegetables in the world. Until 2021, the company’s headquarters were based in Delaware, and it still receives pineapple imports to the Port of Wilmington in the state’s largest city.

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Ranked: Average Annual Salaries by Country

See how average annual salaries vary across 30 different countries, adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP).

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Ranked: Average Annual Salaries by Country

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

There are many reasons for why salaries vary between countries: economic development, cost of living, labor laws, and a variety of other factors. Because of these variables, it can be difficult to gauge the general level of income around the world.

With this in mind, we’ve visualized the average annual salaries of 30 OECD countries, adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP). This means that the values listed have taken into account the differences in cost of living and inflation between countries.

Data and Key Takeaways

This data was sourced from the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), an international organization that promotes policies to improve economic and social well-being. It has 38 member countries, though in this instance, data for all of them was not available.

All figures are as of 2022.

RankCountryAverage Annual Salary
(USD, PPP adjusted)
1🇱🇺 Luxembourg78,310
2🇺🇸 U.S.77,463
3🇨🇭 Switzerland72,993
4🇧🇪 Belgium64,848
5🇩🇰 Denmark64,127
6🇦🇹 Austria63,802
7🇳🇱 Netherlands63,225
8🇦🇺 Australia59,408
9🇨🇦 Canada59,050
10🇩🇪 Germany58,940
11🇬🇧 UK53,985
12🇳🇴 Norway53,756
13🇫🇷 France52,764
14🇮🇪 Ireland52,243
15🇫🇮 Finland51,836
16🇸🇪 Sweden50,407
17🇰🇷 South Korea48,922
18🇸🇮 Slovenia47,204
19🇮🇹 Italy44,893
20🇮🇱 Israel44,156
21🇪🇸 Spain42,859
22🇯🇵 Japan41,509
23🇵🇱 Poland36,897
24🇪🇪 Estonia34,705
25🇨🇿 Czechia33,476
26🇵🇹 Portugal31,922
27🇭🇺 Hungary28,475
28🇸🇰 Slovak Republic26,263
29🇬🇷 Greece25,979
30🇲🇽 Mexico16,685

From this dataset we can see that Luxembourg, the U.S., and Switzerland offer the highest average annual salaries.

All three of these countries are highly developed economies with well-established service sectors, which typically lead to more high-paying jobs. The cost of living in these countries is also relatively high, necessitating higher wages to maintain a standard quality of life.

At the other end of this ranking, Mexico and Greece have the lowest average salaries. In Mexico’s case, the country’s economy has a large portion of lower-wage jobs, particularly in agriculture and manufacturing.

Greece, on the other hand, has struggled with consistently high unemployment since the 2008 global financial crisis. This puts downward pressure on wages because there is a surplus of labor.

See More Economics Graphics From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoy graphics like these, check out Visualized: The Most (and Least) Expensive Cities to Live In.

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