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On the Decline: A Look at Earth’s Biodiversity Loss, By Region

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On the Decline: A Look at Earth’s Biodiversity Loss, By Region

The Briefing

  • The Living Planet Index (LPI) tracks the abundance of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, and amphibians across the globe
  • Between 1970 and 2016, the average decline in vertebrate populations was 68%, but the rate of loss differs from region to region
  • Latin America & Caribbean has seen the largest drop in biodiversity at 94%

Visualizing the Decline of Earth’s Biodiversity, By Region

Earth’s biodiversity has seen an overall decrease across the globe. And while each region has seen a decline, some places have experienced higher drops than others.

Using data from WWF’s Living Planet Report 2020, we’ve ranked each region from the greatest average loss in biodiversity, to the least:

RankRegionAverage decline (between 1970 and 2016)
1Latin America & Caribbean94%
2Africa65%
3Asia Pacific45%
4North America33%
5Europe and Central Asia24%

Latin America and Caribbean has seen the most loss, with a 94% drop in average species populations, while Africa comes in second with a 65% drop.

The 5 Major Threats for Biodiversity Loss

While the rate of loss varies across regions, WWF has identified five major threats that are linked to drops in species populations across all regions:

  • Changes in land-use and sea use
    This threat refers to any changes in a species habitat, caused by mining, development, unsustainable agriculture, etc.
  • Species overexploitation
    There are two types of species overexploitation—direct and indirect. Direct is when a species is intentionally hunted. Indirect happens when a species is unintentionally killed (an example would be by-catch in fisheries).
  • Invasive species and disease
    This threat impacts species populations in several ways. Invasive species may spread diseases or may become predators to native species that are not equipped to defend themselves.
  • Pollution
    Pollutants can have both gradual and instant effects on a species. For example, an oil spill has an instant effect on a species’ environment. But other pollutants, such as microplastics, have a much more gradual impact on species health.
  • Climate Change
    This threat has an indirect impact on species. Changes in temperature as a result of climate change can trigger irregular season changes, which can affect natural phenomena like migration and mating seasons.

»Interested in learning more about Earth’s biodiversity, and some of its biggest threats? Read our full article Visualizing the Biggest Threats to Earth’s Biodiversity

Where does this data come from?

Source: Living Planet Report 2020.
Note: LPI measures the abundance of species populations. It measures the average rate of population change in species. It does not mean that specific percent of populations or individuals have been lost.

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Can You Calculate Your Daily Carbon Footprint?

Discover how the average person’s carbon footprint impacts the environment and learn how carbon credits can offset your carbon footprint.

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The Briefing

  • A person’s carbon footprint is substantial, with activities such as food consumption creating as much as 4,500 g of CO₂ emissions daily.
  • By purchasing carbon credits from Carbon Streaming Corporation, you can offset your own emissions and fund positive climate action.

Your Everyday Carbon Footprint

While many large businesses and countries have committed to net-zero goals, it is essential to acknowledge that your everyday activities also contribute to global emissions.

In this graphic, sponsored by Carbon Streaming Corporation, we will explore how the choices we make and the products we use have a profound impact on our carbon footprint.

Carbon Emissions by Activity

Here are some of the daily activities and products of the average person and their carbon footprint, according to Clever Carbon.

Household Activities & ProductsCO2 Emissions (g)
💡 Standard Light Bulb (100 watts, four hours)172 g
📱 Mobile Phone Use (195 minutes per day)*189 g
👕 Washing Machine (0.63 kWh)275 g
🔥 Electric Oven (1.56 kWh)675 g
♨️ Tumble Dryer (2.5 kWh)1,000 g
🧻 Toilet Roll (2 ply)1,300 g
🚿 Hot Shower (10 mins)2,000 g
🚙 Daily Commute (one hour, by car)3,360 g
🍽️ Average Daily Food Consumption (three meals of 600 calories)4,500 g
*Phone use based on yearly use of 69kg per the source, Reboxed

Your choice of transportation plays a crucial role in determining your carbon footprint. For instance, a 15 km daily commute to work on public transport generates an average of 1,464 g of CO₂ emissions. Compared to 3,360 g—twice the volume for a journey the same length by car.

By opting for more sustainable modes of transport, such as cycling, walking, or public transportation, you can significantly reduce your carbon footprint.

Addressing Your Carbon Footprint

One way to compensate for your emissions is by purchasing high-quality carbon credits. 

Carbon credits are used to help fund projects that avoid, reduce or remove CO₂ emissions. This includes nature-based solutions such as reforestation and improved forest management, or technology-based solutions such as the production of biochar and carbon capture and storage (CCS).

While carbon credits offer a potential solution for individuals to help reduce global emissions, public awareness remains a significant challenge. A BCG-Patch survey revealed that only 34% of U.S. consumers are familiar with carbon credits, and only 3% have purchased them in the past.

About Carbon Streaming

By financing the creation or expansion of carbon projects, Carbon Streaming Corporation secures the rights to future carbon credits generated by these sustainable projects. You can then purchase these carbon credits to help fund climate solutions around the world and compensate for your own emissions. 

Ready to get involved?

>> Learn more about purchasing carbon credits at Carbon Streaming

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