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Animation: How the Mobile Phone Market Has Evolved Over 30 Years

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How The Mobile Phone Market Has Evolved Since 1993

The mobile phone landscape looks drastically different today than it did three decades ago.

In 1993, Motorola accounted for more than half of the mobile phone market. But by 2021, its market share had shrunk to just 2.2%. How did this happen, and how has the mobile industry changed over the last 30 years?

This video by James Eagle chronicles the evolution of the mobile phone market, showing the rise and fall of various mobile phone manufacturers. The data spans from December 1992 to December 2021.

The Early Days of Mobile Phones

Motorola is known for being a pioneer in the mobile phone industry.

In 1983, the American company launched one of the world’s first commercially available mobile phones—the DynaTAC 8000X. The revolutionary analog phone cost nearly $4,000 and offered users up to 30 minutes of talk time before needing to be recharged.

Motorola went on to launch a few more devices over the next few years, like the MicroTAC 9800X in 1989 and the International 3200 in 1992, and quickly became a dominant player in the nascent industry. In the early days of the market, the company’s only serious competitor was Finnish multinational Nokia, which had acquired the early mobile network pioneer Mobira.

But by the mid-1990s, other competitors like Sony and Siemens started to gain some solid footing, which chipped away at Motorola’s dominance. In September 1995, the company’s market share was down to 32.1%.

Mobile Phone Market Share by Company% Share (Sept. 1995)
Motorola32.1%
Nokia22.0%
Sony10.7%
NEC9.2%
Siemens2.1%
Samsung0.4%
Other23.5%

By January 1999, Nokia surpassed Motorola as the leading mobile phone manufacturer, accounting for 21.4% of global market share. That put it just slightly ahead of Motorola’s 20.8%.

One of the reasons for Nokia’s surging popularity was the major headway the company was making in the digital phone space. In 1999, the company released the Nokia 7110, the first mobile phone to have a web browser.

But it wasn’t just Nokia’s innovations that were hampering Motorola. In 1999, Motorola fell on hard times after one of its spin-off projects called Iridium SSC filed for bankruptcy. This put a massive financial strain on the company, and it eventually laid off a large chunk of its workforce after the project failed.

From then on, Motorola’s market share hovered between 14% and 20%, until Apple’s iPhone entered the scene in 2007 and turned the mobile phone industry on its head.

The Emergence of the iPhone

Things really started to change with the launch of the iPhone in 2007.

In a keynote presentation at the San Francisco Macworld Expo in 2007, Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as three products wrapped into one device: a touchscreen iPod, a revolutionary cell phone, and an internet communications device.

One year later, Apple launched the App Store, which gave users the ability to download applications and games onto their iPhones. Not only did this greatly enhance the iPhone’s functionality, but it also allowed consumers to customize their mobile devices like never before.

This was the start of a new era of smartphones—one that Motorola failed to keep up with. Less than two years after the iPhone launched, Apple had captured 17.4% of the mobile phone market. In contrast, Motorola’s market share had shrunk down to 4.9%.

By the end of 2021, Apple held about 27.3% of the global mobile market. The iPhone is a key part of the tech giant’s growth, driving more than 50% of the company’s overall revenue.

A Failure to Pivot

While a number of factors contributed to Motorola’s downfall, many point to one central hurdle—the company’s failure to pivot.

The iPhone’s emergence was the start of a new, software-driven era. Motorola had mastered the hardware-driven era, but failed to keep up when the tides changed. And the animation above highlights other companies that also failed to adapt or keep up, including BlackBerry (formerly RIM), Palm, Sony, and LG.

But Apple is not alone. The popularity of Google’s Android mobile operating system has helped competitors like South Korea’s Samsung and China’s Huawei and Xiaomi flourish, with each company establishing strong footholds in the global mobile phone market.

In today’s fast-paced world, the ability to pivot is essential if businesses want to remain competitive. Will today’s mobile phone giants like Apple and Samsung remain on top? Or will other companies like Huawei catch up in the next few years?

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Technology

What Laptop Brands do Americans Use in 2024?

Statista surveyed nearly 7,000 American adults aged 18–64 asking them what laptop brands were in their households. These are the results.

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A cropped chart with the market share of commonly used laptop brands in the U.S., per Statista survey data current up to March, 2024.

What Laptop Brands do Americans Use in 2024?

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

We chart the market share of commonly used laptop brands in the U.S., per Statista survey data. Multiple responses were allowed, and percentages do not sum to 100.

ℹ️ Survey details: Between April, 2023 and March 2024, 6,843 American adults aged 18–64 were asked: “What brands are the laptops in your households?” The “don’t know” responses have not been visualized.

The U.S. Laptop Market Landscape

HP emerges as the preferred choice for laptops, present in 32% of surveyed households.

Meanwhile, Apple’s dominance in America’s smartphone segment isn’t quite matched in the laptop market with their Macbooks, trailing HP at 28% of households.

Here’s the full survey data.

BrandShare of Respondents
HP32%
Apple28%
Dell24%
Acer14%
Lenovo12%
Samsung12%
Microsoft10%
ASUS9%
Toshiba5%
Alienware4%
DigitalStorm2%
Falcon Northwest2%
Huawei2%
MSI2%
Vaio1%
Other6%
Don't know2%

Note: DigitalStorm, Falcon Northwest, Huawei, MSI, and Vaio’s share of respondents were combined into the “Other” category in the graphic. “Don’t know” responses were not visualized.

Another well-known manufacturer, Dell, comes in at 24%, rounding out the top three by household share.

Other big laptop brands, Acer, Lenovo, Samsung, and Microsoft all range between 10–15% of surveyed households.

For a broader picture, market research firm, Technavio, predicts a 3.2% combined average growth rate for the global laptop market from 2024–28. A lion’s share of that growth (42%) is expected to come from North America. Rising popularity of gaming laptops will be a key tailwind.

Interestingly, thanks to their graphics processing units, gaming laptops are also in demand for AI/machine-learning work. Some companies have already started releasing models catering to this specific audience.

Learn More About Tech From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoyed this post, check out The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2024 where technology companies make up nearly one-fifth of the list by themselves.

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