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China’s Yuan Devaluation: The Aftermath [Chart]

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China's Yuan Devaluation: The Aftermath [Chart]

China’s Yuan Devaluation: The Aftermath [Chart]

Oil and copper get decimated; Euro an unlikely winner

The Chart of the Week is a weekly Visual Capitalist feature on Fridays.

Sometimes it feels like the market is one giant ant farm. Investors and traders build all of their little tunnels, and then all of a sudden someone shakes the ant farm causing impending chaos for the hapless ant denizens.

In this case, it was the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) that shook the ant farm – and they did it multiple times this week.

It all started early Tuesday morning as China moved the midpoint of the yuan’s peg by 1.9%, the biggest move since 1994. The PBOC called this change a “one-time adjustment” and said its fixing will now become more aligned with supply and demand. They then proceeded to devalue the yuan two other times throughout the week for a combined 4.4% decrease in value. The Chinese central bank now claims that the yuan will move more according to market forces, which is necessary to get included into the International Monetary Fund’s basket of currency known as Special Drawing Rights (SDR).

We most recently warned about the inevitability of such central bank moves about a month ago, when the Bank of Canada decreased its benchmark rate for the second time in six months. However, it wasn’t until these moves by the PBOC that the market really felt uneasy, and the term “currency war” entered back into the public vernacular.

Investors are clearly shaken up, as all sorts of trading went haywire in the aftermath of the yuan devaluation. Some currencies, like the Canadian dollar, tanked early and then bounced back to take some gains against the USD. The euro fell initially and then bounced back in a big way, gaining 1.8% in the week’s trading. It’s now trading at eight-week highs.

Countries that are inextricably linked to China by regional trade, such as Singapore, Australia, and New Zealand, all had their currencies fall as well. Some emerging markets were also affected strongly, with the Indian rupee dropping -2.3% through the course of the week against the USD.

However, the biggest impact was to commodity prices. A lower yuan means imports are more costly and creates incentive to buy from domestic Chinese producers of base metals and energy. The devaluation was also interpreted by traders as an admission by the Chinese government that the economy is weak, and this helped copper and oil (WTI) tumble. Copper is at its lowest price ($2.35/lb) since the tail-end of the Financial Crisis, and WTI oil continued its worst summer in trading history to end up in a similar position at $42.35/bbl.

Gold is up on the week by about 1%, but it is also bouncing off of its lowest price since 2010.

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Ranked: Which NHL Team Takes Home the Most Revenue?

The Oilers are the second-highest earning team in the NHL and the Panthers are 26th. We show the top teams in the NHL by revenue in 2023.

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Visualization of NHL team revenues

Which NHL Team Takes Home the Most Revenues?

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

This graphic shows every NHL team’s revenue from the 2022/23 season using data from Forbes, compiled by JP Morgan Asset Management.

Ranked: The Highest-Earning NHL Teams

As the final round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs wears on, two teams on different ends of the revenue spectrum face off.

Despite representing a much smaller city than the other teams at the top of the ranking, the Edmonton Oilers have the second highest revenue in the league at $281 million. The Oilers have seen the fastest revenue growth over the past five years (13%) as the team has improved.

Team2022-23 Season RevenueValuation
Toronto Maple Leafs$281M$2.8B
Edmonton Oilers$281M$1.9B
Los Angeles Kings$279M$2.0B
New York Rangers$265M$2.7B
Montreal Canadiens$265M$2.3B
New Jersey Devils$240M$1.5B
Boston Bruins$239M$1.9B
Vegas Golden Knights$233M$1.1B
Chicago Blackhawks$228M$1.9B
Philadelphia Flyers$219M$1.7B
Washington Capitals$218M$1.6B
Dallas Stars$210M$1.1B
Pittsburgh Penguins$207M$1.2B
Detroit Red Wings$199M$1.2B
Vancouver Canucks$198M$1.3B
Seattle Kraken$197M$1.2B
Tampa Bay Lightning$196M$1.3B
Minnesota Wild$185M$1.1B
St Louis Blues$184M$1.0B
New York Islanders$183M$1.6B
Calgary Flames$183M$1.1B
Colorado Avalanche$182M$1.2B
Nashville Predators$180M$1.0B
Carolina Hurricanes$177M$0.8B
Anaheim Ducks$164M$0.9B
Winnipeg Jets$162M$0.8B
Florida Panthers$161M$0.8B
Buffalo Sabres$159M$0.8B
San Jose Sharks$158M$0.9B
Columbus Blue Jackets$151M$0.8B
Ottawa Senators$128M$1.0B
Arizona Coyotes$120M$0.5B

In the 2022/23 season, the Florida Panthers pulled off a major upset in the first round of the playoffs and fought their way to the finals before losing to the Vegas Golden Knights.

Despite the success last season, the Panthers still find themselves in the bottom six in this ranking, with $161 million in revenue. The team also has the second lowest operating income in the league, after Ottawa. Florida is an emerging hockey market though, with revenue increasing 9% over the past five years.

Other Hockey Revenue Highlights

  • Along with the Oilers, the Toronto Maple Leafs sit at the top of the revenue ranking. There is a key difference though: the Maple Leafs have a higher valuation-to-revenue multiple (10x vs 6.6x).
  • Professional hockey remains attractive to advertisers. In the 2022/23 season, team-specific sponsorship revenue was 36% higher than in 2018/19.
  • The team with the lowest revenue, the Arizona Coyotes, will be moving to Utah next season.
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