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Charted: The Global Decline in Consumer Confidence

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Declining Global Consumer Confidence in 2022

Charting the Global Decline in Consumer Confidence

Our plans to buy new things, travel, invest, and save money, all rely on one crucial factor—our ability to pay for it.

This ability in turn is dependent on not just our current savings, but our expected income and confidence in the economy, i.e. consumer confidence.

This graphic by Gilbert Fontana uses OECD data from 2019‒2022 to chart the rise and fall of consumer confidence in nine major economies.

What is Consumer Confidence?

Measured at a base value of 100, the Consumer Confidence Index takes consumers’ expectations and sentiments about their financial futures into account to indicate household consumption and saving patterns in the future.

An indicator above 100 means that there is a boost in people’s confidence towards economic prospects. This means that they are less likely to save and more inclined to spend money in the near future.

On the other hand, a value below 100 indicates that consumers are pessimistic about their economic standing in the future. This can result in them saving more and spending less.

Inflation, job losses, and expectations of a not-so-bright financial future can shake this confidence, making consumers think twice about their consumption.

Global Consumers are Becoming Pessimistic

After falling down and quickly recovering during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, consumer confidence seems to be trending downwards across the globe.

CountryConsumer Confidence (Oct 2021)Consumer Confidence (Oct 2022)
🇫🇷 France100.896.5
🇩🇪 Germany101.195.9
🇮🇹 Italy102.896.8
🇯🇵 Japan99.096.7
🇬🇧 UK100.791.6
🇺🇸 U.S.98.196.8
🇨🇳 China103.292.1* (Sept 2022)
🇦🇺 Australia100.498.0
🇰🇷 South Korea100.798.3

The UK was hit the worst as its Consumer Confidence Index (CCI) dropped down to 92 in 2022, from 100.6 in 2021. Just behind is China, which also fell to 92 in 2022 despite sitting at 103 two years prior.

The remaining countries had CCIs between 96‒98, including France, Germany, and the U.S.

Even with the most optimistic populations and a CCI of 98, South Korea and Australia, were below the ideal 100 mark and indicated pessimism.

The main culprits of this declining confidence in global economic markets including expectations of rising inflation—especially for food and gas—as well as high interest rates, the threats of a looming recession, and layoffs in major sectors.

To learn more about confidence and predictions for the upcoming year, check out Prediction Consensus: What the Experts See Coming in 2023.
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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Ranked: Average Annual Salaries by Country

See how average annual salaries vary across 30 different countries, adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP).

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Ranked: Average Annual Salaries by Country

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

There are many reasons for why salaries vary between countries: economic development, cost of living, labor laws, and a variety of other factors. Because of these variables, it can be difficult to gauge the general level of income around the world.

With this in mind, we’ve visualized the average annual salaries of 30 OECD countries, adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP). This means that the values listed have taken into account the differences in cost of living and inflation between countries.

Data and Key Takeaways

This data was sourced from the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), an international organization that promotes policies to improve economic and social well-being. It has 38 member countries, though in this instance, data for all of them was not available.

All figures are as of 2022.

RankCountryAverage Annual Salary
(USD, PPP adjusted)
1🇱🇺 Luxembourg78,310
2🇺🇸 U.S.77,463
3🇨🇭 Switzerland72,993
4🇧🇪 Belgium64,848
5🇩🇰 Denmark64,127
6🇦🇹 Austria63,802
7🇳🇱 Netherlands63,225
8🇦🇺 Australia59,408
9🇨🇦 Canada59,050
10🇩🇪 Germany58,940
11🇬🇧 UK53,985
12🇳🇴 Norway53,756
13🇫🇷 France52,764
14🇮🇪 Ireland52,243
15🇫🇮 Finland51,836
16🇸🇪 Sweden50,407
17🇰🇷 South Korea48,922
18🇸🇮 Slovenia47,204
19🇮🇹 Italy44,893
20🇮🇱 Israel44,156
21🇪🇸 Spain42,859
22🇯🇵 Japan41,509
23🇵🇱 Poland36,897
24🇪🇪 Estonia34,705
25🇨🇿 Czechia33,476
26🇵🇹 Portugal31,922
27🇭🇺 Hungary28,475
28🇸🇰 Slovak Republic26,263
29🇬🇷 Greece25,979
30🇲🇽 Mexico16,685

From this dataset we can see that Luxembourg, the U.S., and Switzerland offer the highest average annual salaries.

All three of these countries are highly developed economies with well-established service sectors, which typically lead to more high-paying jobs. The cost of living in these countries is also relatively high, necessitating higher wages to maintain a standard quality of life.

At the other end of this ranking, Mexico and Greece have the lowest average salaries. In Mexico’s case, the country’s economy has a large portion of lower-wage jobs, particularly in agriculture and manufacturing.

Greece, on the other hand, has struggled with consistently high unemployment since the 2008 global financial crisis. This puts downward pressure on wages because there is a surplus of labor.

See More Economics Graphics From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoy graphics like these, check out Visualized: The Most (and Least) Expensive Cities to Live In.

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