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Charting the Number of Failed Crypto Coins, by Year (2013-2022)

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A series of bar charts measuring the volume of failed crypto coins from 2013-2022.

The Number of Failed Crypto Coins, by Year (2013-2022)

Ever since the first major crypto boom in 2011, tens of thousands of cryptocurrency coins have been released to market.

And while some cryptocurrencies performed well, others have ceased to trade or have ended up as failed or abandoned projects.

These graphics from CoinKickoff break down the number of failed crypto coins by the year they died, and the year they started. The data covers a decade of coin busts from 2013 through 2022.

Methodology

What is the marker of a “dead” crypto coin?

This analysis reviewed data from failed crypto coins listed on Coinopsy and cross-referenced against CoinMarketCap to verify previous market activity. The reason for each coin death was also tabulated, including:

  • Failed Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs)
  • Abandonment with less than $1,000 in trade volume over a three-month period
  • Scams or coins that were meant as a joke

Dead Crypto Coins from 2013 to 2022

While many familiar crypto coins—Litecoin, Dogecoin, and Ethereum—are still on the market today, there were at least 2,383 crypto coins that bit the dust between 2013 and 2022.

Here’s a breakdown of how many crypto coins died each year by reason:

Dead Coins
by Year
Abandoned /
No Volume
Scams /
Other Issues
ICO Failed /
Short-Lived
Joke / No
purpose
20139000
20142772052
20152232712
20161522245
201716971466
201839023711212
201920373512
2020771990
2021343622
2022502382
Total1,58452823833

Abandoned coins with flatlining trading volume accounted for 1,584 or 66.5% of analyzed crypto failures over the last decade. Comparatively, 22% ended up being scam coins, and 10% failed to launch after an ICO.

As for individual years, 2018 saw the largest total of annual casualties in the crypto market, with 751 dead crypto coins. More than half of them were abandoned by investors, but 237 coins were revealed as scams or embroiled in other controversies, such as BitConnect which turned out to be a Ponzi scheme.

Why was 2018 such a big year for crypto failures?

This is largely because the year prior saw Bitcoin prices climb above $1,000 for the first time with an eventual peak near $19,000. As a result, speculation ran hot, new crypto issuances boomed, and many investors and firms got bullish on the market for the first time.

How Many Newly Launched Coins Died?

Of the hundreds of coins that launched in 2017, more than half were considered defunct by the end of 2022.

proportion of launched crypto coins each year that have died

Indeed, a lot of earlier-launched coins have since died. The majority of coins launched between 2013 and 2017 have already become “dead coins” by the end of 2022.

Coin Start YearDead Coins by 2022
201366.67%
201476.54%
201568.42%
201660.87%
201757.14%
201827.62%
20194.74%
20201.03%
20210.59%
20220.06%

Part of this is because the cryptocurrency field itself was still being figured out. Many coins were launched in a time of experimentation and innovation, but also of volatility and uncertainty.

However, the trend began to shift in 2018. Only 27.62% of coins launched in that year have bit the dust so far, and the failure rates in 2019 and 2020 fell further to only 4.74% and 1.03% of launched coins, respectively.

This suggests that the crypto industry has become more mature and stable, with newer projects establishing themselves more securely and investors becoming wiser to potential scams.

How will this trend evolve into 2023 and beyond?

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This article was published as a part of Visual Capitalist's Creator Program, which features data-driven visuals from some of our favorite Creators around the world.

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Technology

What Laptop Brands do Americans Use in 2024?

Statista surveyed nearly 7,000 American adults aged 18–64 asking them what laptop brands were in their households. These are the results.

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A cropped chart with the market share of commonly used laptop brands in the U.S., per Statista survey data current up to March, 2024.

What Laptop Brands do Americans Use in 2024?

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

We chart the market share of commonly used laptop brands in the U.S., per Statista survey data. Multiple responses were allowed, and percentages do not sum to 100.

ℹ️ Survey details: Between April, 2023 and March 2024, 6,843 American adults aged 18–64 were asked: “What brands are the laptops in your households?” The “don’t know” responses have not been visualized.

The U.S. Laptop Market Landscape

HP emerges as the preferred choice for laptops, present in 32% of surveyed households.

Meanwhile, Apple’s dominance in America’s smartphone segment isn’t quite matched in the laptop market with their Macbooks, trailing HP at 28% of households.

Here’s the full survey data.

BrandShare of Respondents
HP32%
Apple28%
Dell24%
Acer14%
Lenovo12%
Samsung12%
Microsoft10%
ASUS9%
Toshiba5%
Alienware4%
DigitalStorm2%
Falcon Northwest2%
Huawei2%
MSI2%
Vaio1%
Other6%
Don't know2%

Note: DigitalStorm, Falcon Northwest, Huawei, MSI, and Vaio’s share of respondents were combined into the “Other” category in the graphic. “Don’t know” responses were not visualized.

Another well-known manufacturer, Dell, comes in at 24%, rounding out the top three by household share.

Other big laptop brands, Acer, Lenovo, Samsung, and Microsoft all range between 10–15% of surveyed households.

For a broader picture, market research firm, Technavio, predicts a 3.2% combined average growth rate for the global laptop market from 2024–28. A lion’s share of that growth (42%) is expected to come from North America. Rising popularity of gaming laptops will be a key tailwind.

Interestingly, thanks to their graphics processing units, gaming laptops are also in demand for AI/machine-learning work. Some companies have already started releasing models catering to this specific audience.

Learn More About Tech From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoyed this post, check out The Top 100 Most Valuable Brands in 2024 where technology companies make up nearly one-fifth of the list by themselves.

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