Connect with us

Visual Capitalist

What’s Coming Up in the Next Month on VC+?

Published

on

If you’re a regular visitor to Visual Capitalist, you know that we’re your home base for data-driven, beautiful visuals that help explain a complex world.

But did you know there’s a way to get an even more out of Visual Capitalist, all while helping support the work we do?

Coming Soon on VC+

VC+ is our newly launched members program that gives you exclusive access to extra visual content and insightful special features. It also gets you access to The Trendline, our new members-only graphic newsletter.

So, what is getting sent to VC+ members in the coming days?


“The Rise and Fall of Civilizations”

SPECIAL DISPATCH: Our 9 best visualizations on topics related to world history

The Rise and Fall of Civilizations

Over the course of human history, many civilizations have come to power.

Regardless of whether we are examining the dominance of Genghis Khan and the Mongols, or we’re looking at the more modern rise of superpowers like the United States and China, there is always a compelling visual story to tell.

This upcoming VC+ feature summarizes some of our favorite maps, visualizations, animations, and visual timelines that tell the great stories of human history.

Publishing date: Dec 20 (Get VC+ to access)


“The Most Popular Trendline Stories of 2019”

SPECIAL DISPATCH: What stories did VC+ members love the most?

The Most Popular Trendline Stories of 2019

Since the launch of VC+, we have published 9 editions of The Trendline, our premium graphic newsletter – highlighting 100+ visualizations and data-driven reports chosen by our editors.

If you’ve missed out on this, then this is a great opportunity.

At the end of the year, we’ll be doing a roundup of the most popular Trendline stories over recent months, giving you one-stop access to the cream of the crop.

Publishing date: Dec 27 (Get VC+ to access)


“Prediction Consensus”

SPECIAL DISPATCH: Behind the scenes with our Managing Editor

Prediction Consensus

At the end of every year, we get inundated with bold predictions made by media outlets.

To start the New Year, we’ll sum up all the predictions we can find for 2020 in one data-driven graphic on Visual Capitalist. We’ll see where pundits agree, and where they don’t.

Meanwhile, VC+ members will get to see behind the scenes on our process. How did we tackle such a project, and why did we make the decisions we made?

Publishing date: Jan 2, 2020 (Get VC+ to access)


The Trendline

PREMIUM NEWSLETTER: Our weekly members-only newsletter for VC+ members
The Trendline

Every week, VC+ members also get our premium graphic newsletter, The Trendline.

With The Trendline, we’ll send you the best visual content, datasets, and insightful reports relating to business that our editors find each week.

Publishing Date: Every Sunday


More Visuals. More Insight. More Understanding.

Get access to these upcoming features by becoming a VC+ member.

For a limited time, get 25% off, which makes your VC+ membership the same price as a coffee each month:

Get 25% Off VC+ Today

PS – We look forward to sending you even more great visuals and data!

Comments

Sponsored

History of the Silver State: Nevada and its Silver Districts

Silver made Nevada the state it is today with its famous silver districts :world_map:
Today’s infographic sponsored by Blackrock takes a look at the history of the state’s silver districts and where the future lies for silver.

Published

on

Nevada Silver Districts

History of the Silver State: Nevada and its Silver Districts

Nevada and its silver districts built the western territory into a modern American state.

Today, the world best knows Nevada for its modern gold production—however, a new generation is rediscovering Nevada’s famous silver districts and their potential.

This infographic comes to us from Blackrock Gold and outlines the history of Nevada and its legendary silver districts.

A Timeline of Nevada’s Famous Silver Districts

The Paiute, Shoshone, Quoeech, Washoe, and Walapai tribes populated the territory that is now the American state of Nevada before the Europeans arrived in the 18th century.

Nevada became part of the Spanish Empire as part of the greater province of New Spain, and then later Mexico after independence. As a result of the Mexican–American War and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Mexico permanently lost Alta California in 1848.

The United States continued to administer the area as a territory. As part of the Mexican Cession in 1848 and then the California Gold Rush, the state’s area was first part of the Utah Territory, then the Nevada Territory in 1861.

However, the great Comstock mining boom of 1859 in Virginia City consolidated the area as part of the United States. Silver discoveries and mining spurred development and statehood, all by uncovering the famous silver districts of Nevada.

An eccentric Canadian from Trenton, Ontario, Henry Comstock gave his last name to a discovery that launched mining in Nevada. In 1859, Comstock revealed his discovery and sparked a silver rush, sending thousands of prospectors into Nevada and becoming the genesis of Nevada’s mining industry.

Accidental Treasure: The Tonopah Silver District

Over time, miners exhausted the initial discoveries of silver until the Tonopah District in 1900 revived silver mining in the state.

As the legend goes, Jim Butler discovered the Tonopah district and its silver-rich ore. He went looking for a pack mule that wandered off in the night and sought shelter near a rock outcropping.

When Butler discovered the animal the next morning, he picked up a rock to throw at it in frustration and noticed the rock was heavy. He had stumbled upon the second-richest silver strike in all of Nevada’s history.

Silver production exploded in Tonopah and peaked at 450,000 ounces a year in 1915. However, between World War 1, the Great Depression, and World War 2, the country was exhausted of workers, and silver production tumbled by 1950.

The early suspension of mining in the region left it ripe for new exploration and discovery.

Unrealized Potential in Nevada for Silver Discovery

Today the bulk of the current mining in Nevada occurs along the Cortez and Carlin gold trends in the northeast. However the state’s earliest discoveries lie in what is known as the Walker Lane Trend that extends the entire western border of the state.

Several companies have taken note and are applying modern exploration to a neglected area for a new generation of silver discovery, and the Tonopah lies at the center of the Walker Lane Trend.

It is in the Tonopah Silver district where the past of Nevada lies—and the future will, too.

Subscribe to Visual Capitalist

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading

Sponsored

The Carbon Footprint of Trucking: Driving Toward A Cleaner Future

The impact of booming ecommerce and international trade on trucking’s carbon footprint and GHG emissions is heavy—but there are solutions.

Published

on

The Carbon Footprint of Trucking: Towards a Cleaner Future

The pandemic may have temporarily curbed greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but even a global recession can’t negate the impact of transportation—especially the carbon footprint of trucking.

In 2020, lockdowns resulted in an 8% average global decrease in GHG emissions over the first half of the year, when compared to 2019.

As this infographic from dynaCERT shows, trucking remains a significant contributor of GHGs amid booming ecommerce and increased international trade. But innovative solutions can help.

GHGs and the Impact of Trucking

Between 2005 and 2012, global GHG emissions plateaued but have risen every year since.

This growth is not expected to slow in the coming years. Between 2019 and 2050, the amount of atmospheric CO2 is projected to nearly double, from 4.5 to 8.2 gigatons.

Carbon dioxide is not the only substance emitted by trucking that’s detrimental to the environment:

Greenhouse Gases (GHGs)Black Carbon (BC)

  • Include carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4)

  • Trap heat in Earth’s atmosphere resulting in a greenhouse effect, or “global warming”

  • Emitted during processes like combustion and livestock farming, and can remain suspended in the atmosphere for decades or even centuries


  • Fine particulate air pollution also known as "soot"

  • Emitted by combustion engines, BC is the second-largest contributor to climate change after CO2

  • BC can remain in the atmosphere for weeks before falling to Earth in rain or snow

Road vehicles have been major contributors to GHG and BC emissions for decades—particularly heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) and diesel-engine vehicles, like those used for long-haul trucking.

Below is a snapshot of trucking’s global carbon footprint, beginning with global road emissions:

Global Road TransportationHeavy-duty Vehicles (Trucks)Diesel Engines

  • Creates nearly 30% of all global CO2 emissions


  • Responsible for 80% of the global rise in GHGs (1970-2020)


  • Contributed 30% of all road transport CO2 emissions in 2015


  • Expected to contribute 41% of all road-vehicle CO2 emissions by 2030

  • Responsible for upwards of 80% of black carbon emissions

  • Larger contributors of CO2 and black carbon than gasoline engines and emit 10 times more N2O


  • Diesel HDVs contributed 86% of N2O emissions in 2015


  • 78% of all on-road diesel black carbon emissions in 2017 were emitted by diesel HDVs

Industry Impact: Logistics and Shopping Show No Signs of Stopping

Ecommerce has become one of the most popular online activities. As a result, we’ve become more dependent on trucking—long-haul and last-mile—for the delivery of our goods, both personal and for business.

That trend is expected to continue:

  • By 2040, it’s estimated that 95% of all purchases will be facilitated by ecommerce
  • By 2022, e-retail revenues are projected to double from $3.53 trillion in 2019 to $6.54 trillion
  • Logistics is already a $6.5 trillion industry, of which trucking makes up 43%

Combined with international trade, the impact on long-haul and last-mile transport—and CO2 emissions—becomes more pronounced every year, and has accounted for the 80% rise in worldwide GHG emissions from 1970 to 2010.

Although last-mile transport is increasingly reliant on electric vehicles, long-haul trucking still relies heavily on fossil fuels that emit GHGs like CO2.

As a result, road freight’s contribution to CO2 emissions is projected to grow to 56% by 2050.

The Carbon Market: Reducing Emissions and Improving Bottom Lines

In 1997, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) developed a carbon credit proposal—the Kyoto Protocol—to reduce global carbon emissions. It has guided policies ever since, leading to a proliferation of green strategies that mitigate climate risk and improve business operations.

Companies can leverage this opportunity with a multi-pronged, integrated approach that results in a patented way to harness the carbon market, while improving operations and bottom lines:

The Carbon MarketTechnological Solutions & Carbon Credits

  • Carbon credits are released to companies, helping to reduce GHG emissions by incentivizing environmental measures


  • Allows for efficiencies and credit trading

  • By embracing technology that improves fuel efficiency and optimizes fleets, companies reduce emissions while storing credits for trading


  • Aided by dynaCERT and certified by Verra, extra carbon credits can be captured at a 50/50 shared value


  • Simultaneously, emission-reduction technology and routing software optimizes fleets, reduces GHGs, and enables carbon credit accumulation and trading


  • Responsible for upwards of 80% of black carbon emissions

The benefits of integrated solutions range from improved driver safety and retention to optimized routes, fuel savings, and carbon credit accumulation.

Heavy-Duty Solutions: Driving a Cleaner Future

The long-term impact of the ecommerce boom on CO2 emissions remains to be seen. But it’s coming up quickly on the horizon.

When the weight of the pandemic is lifted, we are likely to encounter more than a transformed economy. An evolving global transport network—supported by technological innovation and new policies like those planned by the U.S. Biden government—is likely to enable more opportunities on the carbon market and pave the way for a greener future.

Subscribe to Visual Capitalist

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Continue Reading

Subscribe

Join the 230,000+ subscribers who receive our daily email

Thank you!
Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

Popular