Visualizing All the Electric Car Models Available in the U.S.
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Visualizing All Electric Car Models Available in the U.S.

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Graphic showcasing all electric car models available in the U.S.

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Visualizing All Electric Car Models Available in the U.S.

America’s electric vehicle (EV) market has surged over the last decade, and it’s only expected to grow further. The Biden administration has allocated billions towards the EV transition in the hopes that by 2030, electric cars make up 50% of all new cars sales in America.

Given the rising demand, what types of electric car models are available for U.S. consumers to choose from today?

This graphic, using data from Car and Driver and EPA, highlights every single EV that’s available for sale across America, showing the wide range of manufacturers, vehicle types, and prices.

What Electric Vehicles Are Available in America?

As of February 2022, there are 28 different electric vehicles available in the U.S., from 18 different manufacturers. Here are their base model statistics:

EV
Model (2022)
Price (MSRP)Max. HorsepowerCombined Fuel EconomyCombined Max. Range
GMC Hummer EV Pickup$110,2951,000N/AN/A
Audi e-tron GT$102,40046982 MPGe238 miles
Mercedes EQS$102,31032997 MPGe350 miles
Tesla Model X$98,940670102 MPGe348 miles
Tesla Model S$94,990670120 MPGe405 miles
Porsche Taycan$82,70032179 MPGe200 miles
Lucid Air Pure$77,400480N/A406 miles
Rivian R1S$72,500600+N/A260+ miles
Jaguar I-Pace*$69,90039476 MPGe234 miles
Rivian R1T$67,500600+70 MPGe260+ miles
Audi e-tron$65,90040278 MPGe222 miles
Volvo C40 Recharge$58,75040287 MPGe226 miles
Volvo XC40 Recharge$55,30040285 MPGe223 miles
Tesla Model Y Long Range$53,940480122 MPGe330 miles
Polestar 2$45,900231107 MPGe270 miles
Tesla Model 3$44,990283132 MPGe272 miles
Audi Q4 e-tron$43,90029595 MPGe241 miles
Ford Mustang Mach-E RWD$43,895266103 MPGe247 miles
Hyundai Ioniq 5$43,650168110 MPGe220 miles
Kia EV6$40,900167117 MPGe232 miles
Volkswagen ID.4*$40,76020199 MPGe260 miles
Kia Niro EV$39,990201112 MPGe239 miles
Hyundai Kona Electric$34,000201120 MPGe258 miles
Chevrolet Bolt EUV$33,500200115 MPGe247 miles
Mazda MX-30$33,47014392 MPGe100 miles
Chevrolet Bolt EV$31,500200120 MPGe259 miles
Mini Cooper SE$29,900181110 MPGe114 miles
Nissan Leaf$27,400147111 MPGe149 miles

As of February 2022. *Indicates EPA data on fuel economy and range was only available for 2021 models.

At less than $30,000, the Nissan Leaf and Mini Cooper SE are currently the most affordable options for Americans.

Released in 2010, the Nissan Leaf is one of the oldest EVs on the market. Widely considered a pioneer in the EV space, it’s one of the top-selling electric cars in the U.S.—in 2021, more than 14,000 cars were sold in America.

While the Leaf’s low price point may be appealing to many, it has the third shortest maximum range on the list at 149 miles before needing a recharge. The only other cars with shorter ranges were the Mini Cooper SE and the Mazda MX-30.

GMC’s Hummer EV pickup is the most expensive EV on the list, with a base price point of $110,295—however, GMC is planning to release less expensive versions of the Hummer EV over the coming years.

The only other EV pickup available in the U.S. market in early 2022 is Rivian’s R1T. However, more manufacturers like Ford and Chevrolet are planning to release their own EV pickups, and Tesla’s Cybertruck has been in the works for years.

And new EVs are quickly entering the market. For example, BMW’s all-electric i4 and iX have only recently become available for sale in the U.S.

The Top EV Manufacturers

There are a number of domestic and international manufacturers that sell EVs in America, including German manufacturer Audi, Swedish carmaker Volvo, and South Korean manufacturer Kia.

Here’s a breakdown of the 18 different manufacturers on the list, six of which are U.S. based:

ManufacturerCountry of HQ# EVs sold in the U.S.
Tesla🇺🇸 U.S.4
Audi🇩🇪 Germany3
Volvo🇸🇪 Sweden2
Rivian🇺🇸 U.S.2
Kia🇰🇷 South Korea2
Hyundai🇰🇷 South Korea2
Chevrolet🇺🇸 U.S.2
Volkswagen🇩🇪 Germany1
Porsche🇩🇪 Germany1
Polestar🇸🇪 Sweden1
Nissan🇯🇵 Japan1
Mini Cooper🇩🇪 German1
Mercedes🇩🇪 German1
Mazda🇯🇵 Japan1
Lucid🇺🇸 U.S.1
Jaguar🇬🇧 UK1
GMC🇺🇸 U.S.1
Ford🇺🇸 U.S.1

Tesla has the highest number of EV models on the market, with four different vehicles available: the Model S, Model X, Model Y, and the Model 3. It’s one of the few manufacturers on the list that exclusively makes electric cars—the only others being Rivian and Lucid.

While anticipation has been building around Tesla’s Cybertruck, and murmurs of a cheaper Tesla have been circulating, Tesla’ CEO Elon Musk has confirmed that there will be no new Tesla models released in 2022. The company will instead focus on its existing models for the time being.

Are U.S. Consumers Ready to Transition to Electric Cars?

It’s important to note that, while EV adoption in America has increased over the years, the U.S. is still lagging behind other countries. Between 2015 and 2020, America’s EV fleet grew at an annual rate of 28%, while China’s grew by 51%, and Europe increased by 41%.

Why are so many Americans dragging their feet when it comes to electric cars? According to a survey by Pew Research Center, the cost is a big barrier, as well as concerns over their reliability compared to gas vehicles.

But with gas prices at all-time highs, and as consumers grow increasingly concerned over the carbon costs of gas vehicles, switching to an electric car may soon be too hard to resist.

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Green

Explained: The Relationship Between Climate Change and Wildfires

More carbon in the atmosphere is creating a hotter world—and gradually fueling both climate change and instances of wildfires.

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How Climate Change is Influencing Wildfires

Each year, thousands of wildfires burn through millions of acres of land around the world.

We’ve already seen the mass devastation that wildfires can bring, especially in places like Australia, Serbia, and California. But new research by the UN indicates that things might get even worse by the end of the century. By 2100, the frequency of wildfires could increase by up to 50%.

What’s causing this influx of wildfires around the world? Below, we dig into how climate change is impacting wildfires—and how in turn, wildfires are impacting climate change.

Climate Conditions That Support Wildfires

Before diving in, it’s worth going over the basics of wildfires, and how they get started in the first place. An area’s vulnerability to wildfires, also known as its fire regime, depends on three major conditions: its atmosphere, vegetation, and ignitions.

① Atmosphere

Atmosphere plays a big part in how sensitive an area is to wildfires. For instance, wind can increase oxygen supply in an area, which would help fuel a wildfire, and may even transfer embers to new locations.

② Vegetation

Vegetation is also a huge factor in whether or not an area is vulnerable to wildfires. A region with drier vegetation may catch fire more easily, and an area with more forest or shrubs provides more fuel for potential blazes.

③ Ignitions

An area that’s close to volcanic activity, or prone to lightning storms may be more susceptible to wildfires. However, human activity like campfires or faulty equipment can also trigger fires, so popular areas for camping or logging may be at higher risk as well.

While these conditions vary depending on the location, in general, fire regimes are being impacted by climate change, which is causing an influx in the duration and intensity of wildfires around the world.

The Fire Climate Feedback Loop

Since the 1850s, global surface temperatures have risen by about 1.0°C (1.8°F).

These increased surface temperatures have had far-reaching impacts on our climate—in the Northern Hemisphere, warmer temperatures have led to less snow, earlier arrival of spring, and ultimately longer, drier fire seasons.

These longer fire seasons have led to an influx of wildfires. But here’s the kicker—wildfires emit tons of carbon. In 2021, wildfires around the world emitted an estimated 1.76 billion tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere, which for context, is more than double the annual emissions from the entire country of Germany.

This carbon gets trapped in our atmosphere and contributes to rising surface temperatures. In other words, more carbon creates more wildfires—and more wildfires create more carbon.

Extreme Weather Events Are Rising In General

It’s not just wildfires that are growing in frequency and intensity because of climate change—droughts, heatwaves, and floods are also becoming more common around the world.

This year, temperatures reached all-time highs across Europe, which wrecked havoc across the continent, impacted infrastructure, and even took lives.

Experts warn that this may become the new normal. To help mitigate risk, governments, policymakers, and companies need to band together to create safeguards and establish proper preventative measures.

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Energy

Visualizing U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Sector

The U.S. emits about 6 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases a year. Here’s how these emissions rank by sector.

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The following content is sponsored by National Public Utilities Council.


Visualizing U.S. Emissions by Sector

Decarbonization efforts in the U.S. are ramping up, and in 2020, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were lower than at any point during the previous 30 years.

However there’s still work to be done before various organizations, states, and nationwide targets are met. And when looking at GHG emissions by sector, the data suggests that some groups have more work cut out for them than others.

This graphic from the National Public Utilities Council provides the key data and trends on the total emissions by U.S. sector since 1990.

The Highest Emitting Sectors

Collectively, the U.S. emitted 5,981 million metric tons (MMT) of CO2-equivalent (CO2e) emissions in 2020, which rose 6.1% in 2021.

Here’s how the various sectors in the U.S. compare.

Sector2020 GHG emissions, MMT CO2ePercentage of Total
Transportation1,627.627%
Electricity generation1,482.625%
Industry1,426.224%
Agriculture635.111%
Commercial425.37%
Residential362.06%
U.S. territories23.0<1%

The transportation sector ranks highest by emissions and has been notably impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, which is still affecting travel and supply chains. This has led to whipsawing figures during the last two years.

For instance, in 2020, the transportation sector’s emissions fell 15%, the steepest fall of any sector. But the largest increase in emissions in 2021 also came from transportation, which is largely credited to the economic and tourism recovery last year.

Following transportation, electricity generation accounted for a quarter of U.S. GHG emissions in 2020, with fossil fuel combustion making up nearly 99% of the sector’s emissions. The other 1% includes waste incineration and other power generation technologies like renewables and nuclear power, which produce emissions during the initial stages of raw material extraction and construction.

Decarbonizing the Power Sector

The Biden Administration has set a goal to make the U.S. power grid run on 100% clean energy by 2035—a key factor in achieving the country’s goal of net zero emissions by 2050.

Industrial factories, commercial buildings, and homes all consume electricity to power their machinery and appliances. Therefore, the power sector can help reduce their carbon footprint by supplying more clean electricity, although this largely depends on the availability of infrastructure for transmission.

Here’s how sectors would look if their respective electricity end-use is taken into account

SectorEmissions by Sector % of Total
Agriculture11%
Transportation27%
Industry30%
Residential & Commercial30%

Percentages may not add up to 100% due to independent rounding

With these adjustments, the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors experience a notable jump, and lead ahead of other categories

Today, the bulk of electricity generation, 60%, comes from natural gas and coal-fired power plants, with nuclear, renewables, and other sources making up 40% of the total.

Energy Source2020 Electric generation, billion kWhShare of total
Natural Gas1,57538.3%
Coal89921.8%
Nuclear77818.9%
Wind3809.2%
Hydropower2606.3%

However, progress and notable strides have been made towards sustainable energy. In 2021, renewables accounted for one-fifth of U.S. electricity generation, roughly doubling their share since 2010.

Coal’s share as a source of electric power has dropped dramatically in recent years. And partially as a result, electricity generation has seen its portion of emissions successfully decrease by 21% , with overall emissions falling from 1,880 million metric tons of CO2 to 1,482 million metric tons.

How Utilities Can Lead the Way

Should these trends persist, the electricity generation sector has a chance to play a pivotal role in the broader decarbonization initiative. And with the bulk of electricity generation in the U.S. coming from investor-owned utilities (IOUs), this is a unique opportunity for IOUs to lead the transition toward cleaner energy.

The National Public Utilities Council is the go-to resource to learn how utilities can lead in the path towards decarbonization.

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