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The Top Struggles of Remote Workers

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The Top Struggles of Remote Workers

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The Briefing

  • The top challenge remote workers face is unplugging from work, followed by loneliness, and communicating with coworkers.
  • Despite these challenges, 98% of remote workers wish to continue working remotely, at least some of the time.

The Top Struggles of Remote Workers

Unplugging from work can be challenging at the best of times.

But when your living room doubles as your office, it can be even harder–at least that’s the case for 22% of remote workers.

Thanks to the global pandemic, millions of workers have been sent home to work at a safe distance. While many remote workers enjoy the flexibility that comes with remote work, it doesn’t come without its drawbacks.

Here’s a ranking of the top struggles that remote workers face, according to a recent report by Buffer and AngelList:

RankChallenge% of Respondents
1Unplugging from work22%
2Loneliness19%
3Collaborating and/or communicating17%
4Distractions at home10%
5Different time zones from team8%
6Staying motivated8%
7Taking vacation time7%
8Reliable WiFi3%

The report also found that only 15% of employers paid the cost of home internet, and 21% covered the cost of a phone plan in a work-from-home situation. However, with this type of arrangement still being relatively new for most, these perks could evolve over time.

Despite the various challenges involved, 98% of remote workers would like to continue working remotely, at least some of the time, for the rest of their careers.

In short—while remote work poses its own set of struggles, the benefits outweigh the cons.

»For a more in-depth look at the topic of remote work, visit: How People and Companies Feel About Working Remotely.

Where does this data come from?

Source: The State of Remote Work Report, from Buffer and AngelList
Details: Survey results from 3,500 remote workers from across the globe.
Notes: This report was published in February of 2020 and the data was collected in November of 2019.

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Datastream

Ranked: The Top 10 Football Clubs by Market Value

In football, there’s a lot on the line both on and off the pitch. The top 10 clubs hold a combined value of $36 billion.

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football clubs by market value

The Briefing

  • The top 10 football clubs hold a combined $36 billion in market value
  • English clubs represent 6 of the 10 top football clubs

The Top 10 Football Clubs by Market Value

In the world of football, the stakes are rising due to the amount of dollars injected into the game. In light of the rapid rise and fall of the European Super League (ESL), this graphic covers the top 10 football clubs by market value.

Today, the top 10 clubs are collectively worth $36 billion and bring in over $6 billion in annual revenues.

Football ClubMarket Value ($M)Revenue ($M)
Barcelona$4,760$792
Real Madrid$4,750$792
Bayern Munich$4,220$703
Manchester United$4,200$643
Liverpool$4,100$619
Manchester City$4,000$609
Chelsea$3,200$520
Arsenal$2,800$430
PSG$2,500$599
Tottenham$2,300$494

Football clubs have witnessed more money being thrown into the game, partly because of the licensing and streaming deals behind the curtain. Big entities have entered the space like Amazon, Disney through ESPN, and DAZN, which has been regarded as the Netflix of sport.

From an audience standpoint, business interest in the sport is justified. In the last World Cup final, 517 million tuned in, compared to 160 million for the Super Bowl during the same year.

More Money in the Game

It’s not just the clubs that are seeing more money trickle down. Both fees for agents and player transfers have soared. From 2014 to 2019, agent fees grew from $241 million to $653 million. Similarly, transfer fees grew from $2.6 billion to $7.3 billion between 2012-2019.

YearPlayer Transfer Fees ($M)Agent Fees ($M)
2019$7,350$653
2018$6,940$548
2017$6,290$447
2016$4,720$387
2015$4,130$297
2014$4,020$241

The COVID-19 Impact

Like any sport, football has suffered from the lack of social gatherings for the better part of a year. Matchday revenues, which represent sales generated in the stadium, have dried up. Prior to the pandemic, the top 10 clubs generated approximately 20% of their sales from matchday.

Fortunately, it appears supporters will be re-gathering sooner rather than later, Wembley Stadium welcomed 8,000 fans in a recent showdown between Manchester City and Tottenham on April 25th.

Where does this data come from?

Source: Forbes
Notes: Football clubs data is as of 2020

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Datastream

Europe Leads in EV Sales, but for How Long?

Europe was the global leader in EV sales for the first time in 2020, surpassing China by a thin margin of just 60,000 cars.

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The Briefing

  • Europe and China were the largest electric vehicle (EV) markets by a wide margin in 2020
  • EV adoption in the U.S. is expected to rise as the Biden administration works to increase industry incentives

Europe Leads in EV Sales, but for How Long?

Global sales of electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrids (PHEV) surpassed 3 million for the first time in 2020, despite the economic headwinds imposed by COVID-19.

This visualization presents a geographical breakdown of these sales, revealing that over 80% were made in either Europe or China.

CountryEV and Plug-in Hybrid Sales (2020) Population (2020) 
European Union (EU)1,390,000747.6M
China1,330,0001.4B
U.S.328,000331.0M
South Korea52,00051.3M
Canada47,00037.7M
Japan31,000126.5M
Taiwan7,00023.8M
Other43,000-

The EU was the largest market by a margin of 60,000 cars, but given China’s larger population, it’s likely the two will switch places in the near future.

Government Incentives Play a Key Role

Government incentives have boosted the transition to battery power in recent years. For example, many countries offer a buyer rebate, which effectively reduces the price a consumer pays for an EV or PHEV.

In Germany, buyers can receive a subsidy of $10,800 when purchasing an EV with a list price of less than $48,000. China also offers a rebate program, where buyers of an EV with a travel range of at least 186 miles can receive a subsidy of $2,500.

Consumers should be aware that these incentives are likely to diminish over time, especially as EVs become more mainstream. In January 2021, the Chinese government announced it would reduce its existing subsidies by 20%.

Will EV Sales in America Catch Up?

In a 2020 survey, 71% of U.S. drivers said they were interested in getting an EV—so why are sales so far behind Europe and China?

In that same survey, 50% of drivers cited a lack of public charging stations as the main factor for preventing them from buying an EV. Concerns like these have led the Biden administration to propose a more aggressive EV strategy, which includes the installation of at least 500,000 charging stations by 2030.

»If you found this post interesting, you might enjoy this graphic that compares electric vehicle highway ranges

Where does this data come from?

Source: EV Volumes, Worldometer
Notes: Final figures rounded

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