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The Reputational Risks That CEOs are Most Worried About

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The Reputational Risks That CEOs are Most Worried About

View the full-size version of the infographic by clicking here

Building an enduring business isn’t easy work.

It can take decades to earn trust and respect in a given market, and it only takes one terrible miscue to unravel all of that goodwill.

As a result, it’s no surprise that the world’s best CEOs think a lot about evaluating these kinds of risks. So what do executives see as being the biggest reputational risks lingering over the next 12 months for their businesses?

Risky Business

Today’s infographic comes to us from Raconteur, and it breaks down the near-term reputational risks seen by CEOs as based on research by Deloitte.

The concerns highlighted in the survey fall into three major categories:

  1. Security risks: including physical and cyber breaches (41%)
  2. Supply chain: risks arising from extended enterprise and key partners (37%)
  3. Crisis response capabilities: how the organization deals with crises (35%)

Let’s dive a little deeper, to see why these broad areas are such a concern.

Security Risks

As more people work remotely, CEOs see a rising risk stemming from data breaches.

Although 89% of the C-suite believes that employees will do everything they can do to safeguard information, about 22% say their employees aren’t aware of offsite data policies. The devices most at risk, according to this group, are company mobile phones (50%), company laptops (45%) and USB storage devices (41%).

Supply Chain Risk

When it comes to maintaining the quality of your product or service, it’s not optimal to be reliant on third-parties.

However, it’s also unlikely for companies to be fully vertically integrated – somewhere along the way, you need to get raw materials from a supplier, or you need to rely on a logistics company to deliver your goods to market. The more borders that need to be crossed, and the further an item has to go, the more complicated it all gets.

In terms of supply chain risk, CEOs are mostly concerned about government action (or inaction): uncertainty about policy, over-regulation, trade conflicts, geopolitical uncertainty, and protectionism were all items that registered high on the list.

Crisis Management

It pays to be prepared when it comes to crises.

The only problem? It would seem the data that C-level execs need to make emergency decisions is not up to snuff. For example, 95% of CEOs see customer and client data as being necessary in such a situation, but only 15% of companies are successfully collecting such data.

The same gap seems to occur when it comes to other types of data, including brand reputation data, financial forecasts and projections, employee needs and views, industry peer benchmarking, and supply chain data.

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Mapped: The World’s Least Affordable Housing Markets in 2024

See which housing markets are considered ‘impossibly unaffordable’ according to their median price-to-income ratio.

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The World’s Least Affordable Housing Markets in 2024

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Many cities around the world have become very expensive to buy a home in, but which ones are the absolute most unattainable?

In this graphic, we highlight a number of housing markets that are deemed to be “impossibly unaffordable” in 2024, ranked by their median price-to-income ratio.

This data comes from the Demographia International Housing Affordability Report, which is produced by the Chapman University Center for Demographics and Policy.

Data and Key Takeaway

The median price-to-income ratio compares median house price to median household income within each market. A higher ratio (higher prices relative to incomes) means a city is less affordable.

See the following table for all of the data we used to create this graphic. Note that this analysis covers 94 markets across eight countries: Australia, Canada, China, Ireland, New Zealand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

RankMetropolitan MarketCountryMedian price-to-income
ratio
1Hong Kong (SAR)๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ณ China16.7
2Sydney๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ Australia13.8
3Vancouver๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ Canada12.3
4San Jose๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.11.9
5Los Angeles๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.10.9
6Honolulu๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.10.5
7Melbourne๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ Australia9.8
8San Francisco๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.9.7
9Adelaide๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡บ Australia9.7
10San Diego๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.9.5
11Toronto๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ Canada9.3
12Auckland๐Ÿ‡ณ๐Ÿ‡ฟ New Zealand8.2

According to the Demographia report, cities with a median price-to-income ratio of over 9.0 are considered โ€œimpossibly unaffordableโ€.

We can see that the top city in this ranking, Hong Kong, has a ratio of 16.7. This means that the median price of a home is 16.7 times greater than the median income.

Which Cities are More Affordable?

On the flipside, here are the top 12 most affordable cities that were analyzed in the Demographia report.

RankMetropolitan MarketCountryMedian price-to-income
ratio
1Pittsburgh๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.1
2Rochester๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.4
2St. Louis๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.4
4Cleveland๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.5
5Edmonton๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ Canada3.6
5Buffalo๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.6
5Detroit๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.6
5Oklahoma City๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.6
9Cincinnati๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.7
9Louisville๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ U.S.3.7
11Singapore๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ‡ฌ Singapore3.8
12Blackpool & Lancashire๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง U.K.3.9

Cities with a median price-to-income ratio of less than 3.0 are considered “affordable”, while those between 3.1 and 4.0 are considered “moderately unaffordable”.

See More Real Estate Content From Visual Capitalist

If you enjoyed this post, be sure to check out Ranked: The Most Valuable Housing Markets in America.

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