Connect with us

Technology

When Tech Giants Go Shopping

Published

on

When Tech Giants Go Shopping

When Tech Giants Go Shopping

 

So far, 2014 has been a big year for the tech industry in regards to acquisitions. But if you think that Facebook’s $19 billion purchase of WhatsApp was the largest, you’d be mistaken.

Acquisitions are a huge part of driving the tech industry forward. They bring in new ideas, fresh talent, proprietary technologies, and much more. For investors, an acquisition can mean big money, on both ends of a buyout. Take for example Comcast’s bid for taking over Time Warner Cable earlier this year, investors in Time Warner enjoyed a 6.8% jump in their stock value. These types of deals aren’t rare; just last year, there were 2,710 mergers and acquisitions in the tech industry.

The Big 4 of the tech world (Apple, Facebook, Microsoft and Google) all have made very important acquisitions, and some may even change the world. Take for example Google’s buyout of YouTube back in 2006. The video streaming site was purchased for $1.6 billion in stock. YouTube has come a long way from being famous for its entertaining gag videos like “Charlie Bit My Finger.” The platform has become a worldwide visual communication tool. It even played a role in liberating parts of the Arab world in the Arab Spring. Today, YouTube is estimated to be valued at $15 billion.

Perhaps the next big game changing acquisition will be one that wasn’t mentioned in the infographic: Apple’s purchase of Beats Electronics. Apple acquired Beats for a reported $3 billion. Some speculate it wasn’t to offer superior headphones to Apple’s clientele; rather, it was for Beats’ streaming service. There may be a shift in how modern music listeners enjoys their music. Apple’s iTunes’ sales have been slowly dwindling as of late, album sales are down 15% this year. The future may lie in subscription based streaming services, something Beats has a head start in.

We’re only half way through 2014 and we have already seen major players shake up the tech industry through mergers and acquisitions. I am sure that I’m not alone when I say I’m excited to see what’s in store for the remainder of the year.

Original infographic from: FinancesOnline.com

Click for Comments

Technology

Can Data Centers Be Sources of Sustainable Heat?

Data centers produce a staggering amount of heat, but what if instead of treating it as waste, we could harness it instead?

Published

on

Diagram showing how waste heat from data centers could be recaptured and recycled to provide sustainable heat in residential and commercial settings.

Published

on

The following content is sponsored by HIVE Digital

Can Data Centers Be Sources of Sustainable Heat?

Data centers support the modern technologies on which we rely, but also generate incredible amounts of heat as waste. 

And since computers tend to be very sensitive to heat, operators go to great lengths (and expense) to get rid of it, even relocating to countries with lower year-round average temperatures. But what if instead of letting all that heat disappear into thin air, we could harness it instead?

In this visualization, we’ve teamed up with HIVE Digital to see how data centers are evolving to recapture and recycle that energy.

How Much Heat Does a Data Center Produce?

To get an idea how much heat we’re talking about, let’s imagine a mid-sized cryptocurrency operation with 1,000 of the most energy-efficient mining rigs on the market today, the Antminer S21 Hydro. One of these rigs needs 5,360 watts of power, which over a year adds up to 47 MWh.

Multiply that by 1,000 and you end up with over 160 billion BTU, which is enough energy to heat over 4,600 U.S. homes for a year, or if it happens to be Oscar season, enough heat to pop 463,803 metric tons of popcorn. Less if you want melted butter on it. 

How Waste Heat Recycling Works?

At a high level, waste heat is recaptured and transferred via heat exchangers to district heating networks, for example, where it can be used to provide sustainable heat. Cool air is then returned to the data center and the cycle begins again.

Liquid cooling is by far the most efficient means of recapturing and transporting heat, since water can hold roughly four times as much heat as air.

Data centers around the world are already recycling their waste heat to farm trout in Norway, heat research facilities in the U.S., and to heat swimming pools in France.

A Greener Future for Data Centers?

Waste heat recycling has so far been voluntary, led by operators looking to put their operations on a more sustainable footing, but new regulations could change that. 

Amsterdam and Haarlemmermeer in the Netherlands require all new data centers to explore recycling their waste heat. In Norway, they require it for all new data centers above 2 MW, while Denmark has taken a carrot approach, and developed tax cuts and financial incentives. And in late 2023, the EU Energy Efficiency Directive came into force, which will require data centers to recycle waste heat, or show that recovery is technically or economically infeasible. 

With Europe leading the way, could North America be very far behind?

HIVE Digital Provides Sustainable Heat

HIVE Digital is already recycling waste heat from its data center operations in Canada and Sweden. 

Their 30 MW data center in Lachute, Québec, is heating a 200,000 sq. ft. factory, while their 32 MW data center in Boden, Sweden, is heating a 90,000 sq. ft. greenhouse, helping to provide sustainably grown local produce, just one degree short of the Arctic Circle.

Visual Capitalist Logo

Learn how HIVE Digital is helping to meet the demands of emerging technologies like AI, sustainably.

Click for Comments

You may also like

Subscribe

Continue Reading
MSCI Climate Metrics Paper - A simple toolkit for climate investing

Subscribe

Popular