Race to Net Zero: Carbon Neutral Goals by Country
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Race to Net Zero: Carbon Neutral Goals by Country

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The following content is sponsored by the National Public Utilities Council

Race to Net Zero: Carbon Neutral Goals by Country

The time to talk about net zero goals is running out, and the time to put them into action is well underway.

At the U.S. Climate Summit in April 2021, U.S. President Biden pressured countries to either speed up carbon neutral pledges, or commit to them in the first place.

It’s a follow-up to the Paris Agreement, which keeps signatories committed to reaching carbon neutrality in emissions in the second half of the 21st century. But 2050–2100 is a wide timeframe, and climate change is becoming both increasingly present and more dire.

So when are countries committed to reaching net zero carbon emissions, and how serious is their pledge? This infographic from the National Public Utilities Council highlights the world’s carbon neutral pledges.

The Timeline of Carbon Neutral Targets by Country

The first question is how quickly countries are trying to get to net zero.

137 countries have committed to carbon neutrality, as tracked by the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit and confirmed by pledges to the Carbon Neutrality Coalition and recent policy statements by governments.

But the earlier the pledge, the better, and most of the commitments are centered around 2050.

CountryTarget Year
BhutanAchieved
SurinameAchieved
Uruguay2030
Finland2035
Austria2040
Iceland2040
Germany2045
Sweden2045
Afghanistan2050
Andorra2050
Angola2050
Antigua and Barbuda2050
Argentina2050
Armenia2050
Bahamas2050
Bangladesh2050
Barbados2050
Belgium2050
Belize2050
Benin2050
Brazil2050
Bulgaria2050
Burkina Faso2050
Burundi2050
Cabo Verde2050
Cambodia2050
Canada2050
Central African Republic2050
Chad2050
Chile2050
Colombia2050
Comoros2050
Cook Islands2050
Costa Rica2050
Croatia2050
Cyprus2050
Czechia2050
Democratic Republic of Congo2050
Denmark2050
Djibouti2050
Dominica2050
Dominican Republic2050
Ecuador2050
Eritrea2050
Estonia2050
Ethiopia2050
European Union2050
Fiji2050
France2050
Gambia2050
Greece2050
Grenada2050
Guinea2050
Guinea-Bissau2050
Guyana2050
Haiti2050
Hungary2050
Ireland2050
Italy2050
Jamaica2050
Japan2050
Kiribati2050
Laos2050
Latvia2050
Lebanon2050
Lesotho2050
Liberia2050
Lithuania2050
Luxembourg2050
Madagascar2050
Malawi2050
Maldives2050
Mali2050
Malta2050
Marshall Islands2050
Mauritania2050
Mauritius2050
Mexico2050
Micronesia2050
Monaco2050
Mozambique2050
Myanmar2050
Namibia2050
Nauru2050
Nepal2050
Netherlands2050
New Zealand2050
Nicaragua2050
Niger2050
Niue2050
Norway2050
Pakistan2050
Palau2050
Panama2050
Papua New Guinea2050
Paraguay2050
Peru2050
Portugal2050
Romania2050
Rwanda2050
Saint Kitts and Nevis2050
Saint Lucia2050
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines2050
Samoa2050
Sao Tome and Principe2050
Senegal2050
Seychelles2050
Sierra Leone2050
Slovakia2050
Slovenia2050
Solomon Islands2050
Somalia2050
South Africa2050
South Korea2050
South Sudan2050
Spain2050
Sudan2050
Switzerland2050
Tanzania2050
Timor-Leste2050
Togo2050
Tonga2050
Trinidad and Tobago2050
Tuvalu2050
U.S.2050
Uganda2050
United Kingdom2050
Uzbekistan2050
Vanuatu2050
Vatican City2050
Yemen2050
Zambia2050
China2060
Kazakhstan2060
Ukraine2060
Australia2050 – 2100
Singapore2050 – 2100

As far as early achievers go, Bhutan and Suriname are the only two countries that have achieved carbon neutrality and are actually carbon negative (removing more carbon than they emit). Uruguay’s 2030 target is the earliest to try and match that feat, followed by Europe’s Finland, Austria, Iceland, Germany, and Sweden, who are all targeting 2045 or earlier.

Over 90%, or 124 of the 137 countries tracked above, set a target of 2050 for reaching carbon neutrality. This is largely due to membership in the Carbon Neutrality Coalition, which asks member states to target 2050 for their goal but leaves commitment up to them.

Only five countries have net zero pledges set for after 2050, including Australia and Singapore, which haven’t set a firm target yet. Targeting 2060, in addition to Ukraine and Kazakhstan, is the world’s largest emitter, China. The country’s recent pledge is significant, since China accounts for an estimated 25% of global emissions.

In fact, according to the Climate Action Tracker, 73% of global emissions are currently covered by net zero targets.

How Seriously Are Countries Committing to Carbon Neutrality?

Setting a goal is perhaps the easiest step towards carbon neutrality. But the real challenge is in solidifying that goal and starting to make progress towards it. That’s why it’s important to consider how deeply committed each country’s carbon neutral pledge truly is.

The most rigid commitments are enshrined in law, followed by official government policy, though the latter can change alongside governments. Likewise, proposed legislation shows forward momentum in making pledges a reality, but proposals can take a long time to become enacted (or get derailed).

As it turns out, the vast majority of carbon neutral targets are only under discussion, with no formal action being taken to act on them.

CountryTarget Status
BhutanAchieved
SurinameAchieved
DenmarkLaw
FranceLaw
HungaryLaw
New ZealandLaw
SwedenLaw
United KingdomLaw
AndorraPolicy Document
AustraliaPolicy Document
AustriaPolicy Document
BrazilPolicy Document
ChinaPolicy Document
Costa RicaPolicy Document
FinlandPolicy Document
GermanyPolicy Document
IcelandPolicy Document
IrelandPolicy Document
JapanPolicy Document
KazakhstanPolicy Document
Marshall IslandsPolicy Document
NorwayPolicy Document
PanamaPolicy Document
ParaguayPolicy Document
PortugalPolicy Document
SloveniaPolicy Document
South AfricaPolicy Document
SwitzerlandPolicy Document
U.S.Policy Document
UkrainePolicy Document
UzbekistanPolicy Document
Vatican CityPolicy Document
CanadaProposed Legislation
ChileProposed Legislation
European UnionProposed Legislation
FijiProposed Legislation
South KoreaProposed Legislation
SpainProposed Legislation
AfghanistanUnder Discussion
AngolaUnder Discussion
Antigua and BarbudaUnder Discussion
ArgentinaUnder Discussion
ArmeniaUnder Discussion
BahamasUnder Discussion
BangladeshUnder Discussion
BarbadosUnder Discussion
BelgiumUnder Discussion
BelizeUnder Discussion
BeninUnder Discussion
BulgariaUnder Discussion
Burkina FasoUnder Discussion
BurundiUnder Discussion
Cabo VerdeUnder Discussion
CambodiaUnder Discussion
Central African RepublicUnder Discussion
ChadUnder Discussion
ColombiaUnder Discussion
ComorosUnder Discussion
Cook IslandsUnder Discussion
CroatiaUnder Discussion
CyprusUnder Discussion
CzechiaUnder Discussion
Democratic Republic of CongoUnder Discussion
DjiboutiUnder Discussion
DominicaUnder Discussion
Dominican RepublicUnder Discussion
EcuadorUnder Discussion
EritreaUnder Discussion
EstoniaUnder Discussion
EthiopiaUnder Discussion
GambiaUnder Discussion
GreeceUnder Discussion
GrenadaUnder Discussion
GuineaUnder Discussion
Guinea-BissauUnder Discussion
GuyanaUnder Discussion
HaitiUnder Discussion
ItalyUnder Discussion
JamaicaUnder Discussion
KiribatiUnder Discussion
LaosUnder Discussion
LatviaUnder Discussion
LebanonUnder Discussion
LesothoUnder Discussion
LiberiaUnder Discussion
LithuaniaUnder Discussion
LuxembourgUnder Discussion
MadagascarUnder Discussion
MalawiUnder Discussion
MaldivesUnder Discussion
MaliUnder Discussion
MaltaUnder Discussion
MauritaniaUnder Discussion
MauritiusUnder Discussion
MexicoUnder Discussion
MicronesiaUnder Discussion
MonacoUnder Discussion
MozambiqueUnder Discussion
MyanmarUnder Discussion
NamibiaUnder Discussion
NauruUnder Discussion
NepalUnder Discussion
NetherlandsUnder Discussion
NicaraguaUnder Discussion
NigerUnder Discussion
NiueUnder Discussion
PakistanUnder Discussion
PalauUnder Discussion
Papua New GuineaUnder Discussion
PeruUnder Discussion
RomaniaUnder Discussion
RwandaUnder Discussion
Saint Kitts and NevisUnder Discussion
Saint LuciaUnder Discussion
Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesUnder Discussion
SamoaUnder Discussion
Sao Tome and PrincipeUnder Discussion
SenegalUnder Discussion
SeychellesUnder Discussion
Sierra LeoneUnder Discussion
SingaporeUnder Discussion
SlovakiaUnder Discussion
Solomon IslandsUnder Discussion
SomaliaUnder Discussion
South SudanUnder Discussion
SudanUnder Discussion
TanzaniaUnder Discussion
Timor-LesteUnder Discussion
TogoUnder Discussion
TongaUnder Discussion
Trinidad and TobagoUnder Discussion
TuvaluUnder Discussion
UgandaUnder Discussion
UruguayUnder Discussion
VanuatuUnder Discussion
YemenUnder Discussion
ZambiaUnder Discussion

Uruguay’s 2030 target might be the earliest, but it is not yet set in stone. The earliest commitment actually enshrined in law is Sweden’s 2045 target.

Including Sweden, only six countries have passed their carbon neutral targets into law. They include Denmark, France, Hungary, New Zealand, and the UK.

An additional five countries have proposed legislation in the works, including Canada and South Korea, as well as the entirety of the EU.

Meanwhile, 24 countries have their climate targets set as official policy. They include Brazil, China, Germany and the U.S., some of the world’s largest emitters.

99 of the 137 pledges are only under discussion at this time, or more than 72%. That means that they have no official standing as of yet, and are harder to act on. But as time starts to pass, pressure on countries to act on their carbon neutral pledges is beginning to grow.

The National Public Utilities Council is the go-to resource for all things decarbonization in the utilities industry. Learn more.

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Operational Health Tech: A New Billion Dollar Market

Operational health tech is poised to be a multi-billion dollar industry. This graphic breaks down how its disrupting healthcare as we know it.

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Operational Health Tech: A New Billion Dollar Market

Many lessons were learned throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, but what has become most apparent is the need to invest in healthcare on all fronts. In fact in just a few short years, businesses, governments, and consumers have had to entirely reassess healthcare in ways not quite seen before.

What’s more, this elevated importance placed on health could be here to stay, and one area in particular is poised for significant growth: operational health tech.

The graphic above from our sponsor Bloom Health Partners dives into the burgeoning market that is operational health tech, and reveals the key driving forces behind it.

What is Operational Health?

To start, operational health is an industry that provides health services to employees to help keep companies running smoothly.

A critical piece of operational health is workplace health, which is expected to soar in value. From 2021 to 2025, the market for workplace health is expected to grow 200% from $6.5 billion to $19.5 billion.

The industry is undergoing a tremendous amount of innovation, specifically in relation to technological advances.

Operational Health Tech: Disrupting Healthcare

The operational health tech industry is disrupting traditional healthcare by providing direct services to employees in the workplace.

For decades now, the U.S. has increasingly become a statistical outlier for healthcare spending relative to health outcomes. For instance, the average American incurs $9,000 in healthcare spending per year, nearly twice that of OECD countries, yet life expectancy is flatlining while other countries see rises.

A worsening and increasingly expensive health dynamic makes the environment ripe for disruption and is allowing for new ideas to be brought to the table.

In addition, people are already responding to these inefficient practices by shifting greater emphasis on health within the job market. For example, studies show that workers care more about healthcare benefits over the salaries when choosing an employer.

Going forward, employees will gravitate towards employers that provide standout health benefits like workplace healthcare options offered by operational health. Here are some additional factors that act as catalysts for this space.

1. Healthcare as Smart Business

What do companies that rank as some of the best to work for have in common? First, they all tend to outperform relative to the S&P 500 on a cumulative stock performance basis. Second, many offer superior healthcare benefits.

Moreover, from 2012 to 2022, companies that were the best to work for saw shares appreciate nearly 500%, compared to around 300% for the broader market. Data like this suggests investing in healthcare and keeping employees happy is smart business that pays dividends.

2. Healthcare as a Differentiator

Since 2020, labor markets have changed dramatically. As a result, employees now have more options and are much more selective about where they work. This is evident from the difference between job openings and hires which has risen to unrecognizable levels. For example, the data shows that there are nearly 12 million job openings, but only around 6-7 million hires in 2022.

Altogether, with an oversupply of jobs relative to workers, employers will have to find new ways to differentiate. One way to stand out is through healthcare and initiatives around operational health tech.

3. The Looming Mental Health Epidemic

Today some 700 million people suffer from some form of a mental health condition and COVID-19 has continued to exacerbate the problem.

Moreover, the cost of mental health for the global economy is estimated to be a whopping $6 trillion by 2030, over double compared to the $2.5 trillion figure in 2010.

Under the umbrella of services operational health tech covers, mental health will stand to benefit. Especially in the years to come as we look for new ways to combat its mounting costs.

Investing in Operational Health Tech

Bloom Health Partners is an operational health tech company looking to revolutionize workplace health by supplying employers with data to better understand their employee base and business.

One way Bloom stands out is with Bloom Shield—its flagship cloud-based big data platform for employee health data management. With Bloom Shield, new health insights become available to make better decisions. Employers can get insight into demographic data and age trends within the workplace, pre-screening detection for cancer and diabetes, and testing for management to tackle the spread of disease.

Click here to learn more about investing in operational health tech with Bloom Health Partners.

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How Environmental Markets Advance Net Zero

The global price of carbon increased 91% in 2021. Below, we show how environmental markets are supporting a greener future.

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Environmental Markets

How Environmental Markets Advance Net Zero

In 2021, roughly 20% of global carbon emissions were covered by carbon pricing mechanisms.

Meanwhile, the global price of carbon increased 91%, bolstered by government, corporate, and investor demand. This puts traditional fuel sources at a disadvantage, instead building the investment case for renewables.

This infographic from ICE, the first in a three part series on the ESG toolkit, explores how environmental markets work and their role in the fight against climate change.

What are Environmental Markets?

First, meeting a goal of net zero carbon emissions involves limiting the use of the world’s finite carbon budget to meet a 1.5°C pathway.

Achieving net zero requires us to:

  • Change how we utilize energy and transition to less carbon-intensive fuels
  • Put a value on the conservation of nature or “natural capital” and carbon sinks, which accumulate and store carbon

Environmental markets facilitate the pathway to net zero by valuing externalities, such as placing a cost on pollution and placing a price on carbon storage. This helps balance the carbon cycle to manage the carbon budget in the most cost-effective manner.

What Is the Carbon Budget?

To keep temperatures 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, we have just 420 gigatonnes (Gt) of CO₂ remaining in the global carbon budget. At current rates, this remaining carbon budget is projected to be consumed by 2030 if no reductions are made.

Carbon Budget1.5°C1.7°C2.0°C
Remaining GtCO₂4207701270
Consumed GtCO₂247524752475

Each scenario based on a 50% chance of success
Source: IPCC AR6 WG; Friedlingstein et al 2021; Global Carbon Budget 2021

Across three different scenarios, the above table indicates the amount of carbon emissions humanity can emit to prevent the worst effects of climate change.

What are Negative and Positive Externalities?

Second, when companies compensate for CO₂ emissions, they can fall across two categories: negative and positive externalities.

  • Negative externalities include pollution. Carbon cap and trade programs, using carbon allowances, put a cost on pollution.
  • Positive externalities include renewables, such as wind and solar power that generate carbon-free electricity. The value of renewable energy can be expressed with a renewable energy certificate.

Natural capital is another example of a positive externality, which involves the capturing and storing of carbon. The value of this type of natural capital can be expressed using a carbon credit.

Environmental Markets and the Energy Transition

Next, environmental markets can drive the transition to cleaner energy sources by ascribing a cost to pollution and putting a premium on renewables, to change how we use energy.

As one example, in 2013 the UK government introduced the Carbon Price Support mechanism to complement the emissions cap and trade program and weaken the investment case for coal. Between 2013 and 2020, Britain’s overall CO₂ emissions fell by 31%.

Here’s how coal was phased out of the UK’s energy mix, while renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and bioenergy played a greater role.

DateCoal Gas Wind and SolarBioenergy
Q1 200031 TWh40 TWh0 TWh1 TWh
Q1 200541 TWh36 TWh1 TWh2 TWh
Q1 201031 TWh47 TWh2 TWh3 TWh
Q1 201528 TWh23 TWh13 TWh6 TWh
Q1 20203 TWh27 TWh28 TWh9 TWh

Source: Digest of UK Energy Statistics (DUKES); BP; EMBER via Our World in Data (2021)

Today, less than 5% of the UK’s electricity is coal-generated, with remaining plants expected to be decommissioned by 2024.

How Environmental Markets are Advancing Net Zero

Finally, as governments increase their commitments to net zero, carbon prices are rising towards a level that requires industries to decarbonize and meet those goals.

In fact, between 2014 and 2021, the global price of carbon has increased over sixfold.

DateGlobal Carbon Price (Year End)Annual % Change
2021$47.7891%
2020$24.9637%
2019$18.16-7%
2018$19.56102%
2017$9.6729%
2016$7.52-24%
2015$9.887%
2014$9.2432%

As indicated by the ICECRBN Global Carbon Price (CPW Weighted)
Source: ICE (Apr 2022)

As companies begin to treat their carbon footprints as liabilities, there will be increasing demand for environmental attributes, such as carbon allowances and carbon credits.

Managing Risk and Opportunity

Quoted markets like ICE Futures Exchanges and NYSE allow stakeholders to precisely value positive and negative externalities to:

  • Manage emissions cost effectively
  • Hedge climate transition risk
  • Allocate capital to facilitate the energy transition and build carbon sinks
  • Create an asset class for Natural Capital
  • Invest in assets to meet climate obligations

Everyone is exposed to climate risk which means it needs to be measured and managed.

That’s why balancing the carbon cycle will be critical to managing the world’s carbon budget. Markets are providing greater access, liquidity and opportunity in supporting net zero ambitions.

In part two of the series sponsored by ICE, we’ll look at four motivations for using ESG data.

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