Race to Net Zero: Carbon Neutral Goals by Country
Connect with us

Sponsored

Race to Net Zero: Carbon Neutral Goals by Country

Published

on

The following content is sponsored by the National Public Utilities Council

Race to Net Zero: Carbon Neutral Goals by Country

The time to talk about net zero goals is running out, and the time to put them into action is well underway.

At the U.S. Climate Summit in April 2021, U.S. President Biden pressured countries to either speed up carbon neutral pledges, or commit to them in the first place.

It’s a follow-up to the Paris Agreement, which keeps signatories committed to reaching carbon neutrality in emissions in the second half of the 21st century. But 2050–2100 is a wide timeframe, and climate change is becoming both increasingly present and more dire.

So when are countries committed to reaching net zero carbon emissions, and how serious is their pledge? This infographic from the National Public Utilities Council highlights the world’s carbon neutral pledges.

The Timeline of Carbon Neutral Targets by Country

The first question is how quickly countries are trying to get to net zero.

137 countries have committed to carbon neutrality, as tracked by the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit and confirmed by pledges to the Carbon Neutrality Coalition and recent policy statements by governments.

But the earlier the pledge, the better, and most of the commitments are centered around 2050.

CountryTarget Year
BhutanAchieved
SurinameAchieved
Uruguay2030
Finland2035
Austria2040
Iceland2040
Germany2045
Sweden2045
Afghanistan2050
Andorra2050
Angola2050
Antigua and Barbuda2050
Argentina2050
Armenia2050
Bahamas2050
Bangladesh2050
Barbados2050
Belgium2050
Belize2050
Benin2050
Brazil2050
Bulgaria2050
Burkina Faso2050
Burundi2050
Cabo Verde2050
Cambodia2050
Canada2050
Central African Republic2050
Chad2050
Chile2050
Colombia2050
Comoros2050
Cook Islands2050
Costa Rica2050
Croatia2050
Cyprus2050
Czechia2050
Democratic Republic of Congo2050
Denmark2050
Djibouti2050
Dominica2050
Dominican Republic2050
Ecuador2050
Eritrea2050
Estonia2050
Ethiopia2050
European Union2050
Fiji2050
France2050
Gambia2050
Greece2050
Grenada2050
Guinea2050
Guinea-Bissau2050
Guyana2050
Haiti2050
Hungary2050
Ireland2050
Italy2050
Jamaica2050
Japan2050
Kiribati2050
Laos2050
Latvia2050
Lebanon2050
Lesotho2050
Liberia2050
Lithuania2050
Luxembourg2050
Madagascar2050
Malawi2050
Maldives2050
Mali2050
Malta2050
Marshall Islands2050
Mauritania2050
Mauritius2050
Mexico2050
Micronesia2050
Monaco2050
Mozambique2050
Myanmar2050
Namibia2050
Nauru2050
Nepal2050
Netherlands2050
New Zealand2050
Nicaragua2050
Niger2050
Niue2050
Norway2050
Pakistan2050
Palau2050
Panama2050
Papua New Guinea2050
Paraguay2050
Peru2050
Portugal2050
Romania2050
Rwanda2050
Saint Kitts and Nevis2050
Saint Lucia2050
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines2050
Samoa2050
Sao Tome and Principe2050
Senegal2050
Seychelles2050
Sierra Leone2050
Slovakia2050
Slovenia2050
Solomon Islands2050
Somalia2050
South Africa2050
South Korea2050
South Sudan2050
Spain2050
Sudan2050
Switzerland2050
Tanzania2050
Timor-Leste2050
Togo2050
Tonga2050
Trinidad and Tobago2050
Tuvalu2050
U.S.2050
Uganda2050
United Kingdom2050
Uzbekistan2050
Vanuatu2050
Vatican City2050
Yemen2050
Zambia2050
China2060
Kazakhstan2060
Ukraine2060
Australia2050 – 2100
Singapore2050 – 2100

As far as early achievers go, Bhutan and Suriname are the only two countries that have achieved carbon neutrality and are actually carbon negative (removing more carbon than they emit). Uruguay’s 2030 target is the earliest to try and match that feat, followed by Europe’s Finland, Austria, Iceland, Germany, and Sweden, who are all targeting 2045 or earlier.

Over 90%, or 124 of the 137 countries tracked above, set a target of 2050 for reaching carbon neutrality. This is largely due to membership in the Carbon Neutrality Coalition, which asks member states to target 2050 for their goal but leaves commitment up to them.

Only five countries have net zero pledges set for after 2050, including Australia and Singapore, which haven’t set a firm target yet. Targeting 2060, in addition to Ukraine and Kazakhstan, is the world’s largest emitter, China. The country’s recent pledge is significant, since China accounts for an estimated 25% of global emissions.

In fact, according to the Climate Action Tracker, 73% of global emissions are currently covered by net zero targets.

How Seriously Are Countries Committing to Carbon Neutrality?

Setting a goal is perhaps the easiest step towards carbon neutrality. But the real challenge is in solidifying that goal and starting to make progress towards it. That’s why it’s important to consider how deeply committed each country’s carbon neutral pledge truly is.

The most rigid commitments are enshrined in law, followed by official government policy, though the latter can change alongside governments. Likewise, proposed legislation shows forward momentum in making pledges a reality, but proposals can take a long time to become enacted (or get derailed).

As it turns out, the vast majority of carbon neutral targets are only under discussion, with no formal action being taken to act on them.

CountryTarget Status
BhutanAchieved
SurinameAchieved
DenmarkLaw
FranceLaw
HungaryLaw
New ZealandLaw
SwedenLaw
United KingdomLaw
AndorraPolicy Document
AustraliaPolicy Document
AustriaPolicy Document
BrazilPolicy Document
ChinaPolicy Document
Costa RicaPolicy Document
FinlandPolicy Document
GermanyPolicy Document
IcelandPolicy Document
IrelandPolicy Document
JapanPolicy Document
KazakhstanPolicy Document
Marshall IslandsPolicy Document
NorwayPolicy Document
PanamaPolicy Document
ParaguayPolicy Document
PortugalPolicy Document
SloveniaPolicy Document
South AfricaPolicy Document
SwitzerlandPolicy Document
U.S.Policy Document
UkrainePolicy Document
UzbekistanPolicy Document
Vatican CityPolicy Document
CanadaProposed Legislation
ChileProposed Legislation
European UnionProposed Legislation
FijiProposed Legislation
South KoreaProposed Legislation
SpainProposed Legislation
AfghanistanUnder Discussion
AngolaUnder Discussion
Antigua and BarbudaUnder Discussion
ArgentinaUnder Discussion
ArmeniaUnder Discussion
BahamasUnder Discussion
BangladeshUnder Discussion
BarbadosUnder Discussion
BelgiumUnder Discussion
BelizeUnder Discussion
BeninUnder Discussion
BulgariaUnder Discussion
Burkina FasoUnder Discussion
BurundiUnder Discussion
Cabo VerdeUnder Discussion
CambodiaUnder Discussion
Central African RepublicUnder Discussion
ChadUnder Discussion
ColombiaUnder Discussion
ComorosUnder Discussion
Cook IslandsUnder Discussion
CroatiaUnder Discussion
CyprusUnder Discussion
CzechiaUnder Discussion
Democratic Republic of CongoUnder Discussion
DjiboutiUnder Discussion
DominicaUnder Discussion
Dominican RepublicUnder Discussion
EcuadorUnder Discussion
EritreaUnder Discussion
EstoniaUnder Discussion
EthiopiaUnder Discussion
GambiaUnder Discussion
GreeceUnder Discussion
GrenadaUnder Discussion
GuineaUnder Discussion
Guinea-BissauUnder Discussion
GuyanaUnder Discussion
HaitiUnder Discussion
ItalyUnder Discussion
JamaicaUnder Discussion
KiribatiUnder Discussion
LaosUnder Discussion
LatviaUnder Discussion
LebanonUnder Discussion
LesothoUnder Discussion
LiberiaUnder Discussion
LithuaniaUnder Discussion
LuxembourgUnder Discussion
MadagascarUnder Discussion
MalawiUnder Discussion
MaldivesUnder Discussion
MaliUnder Discussion
MaltaUnder Discussion
MauritaniaUnder Discussion
MauritiusUnder Discussion
MexicoUnder Discussion
MicronesiaUnder Discussion
MonacoUnder Discussion
MozambiqueUnder Discussion
MyanmarUnder Discussion
NamibiaUnder Discussion
NauruUnder Discussion
NepalUnder Discussion
NetherlandsUnder Discussion
NicaraguaUnder Discussion
NigerUnder Discussion
NiueUnder Discussion
PakistanUnder Discussion
PalauUnder Discussion
Papua New GuineaUnder Discussion
PeruUnder Discussion
RomaniaUnder Discussion
RwandaUnder Discussion
Saint Kitts and NevisUnder Discussion
Saint LuciaUnder Discussion
Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesUnder Discussion
SamoaUnder Discussion
Sao Tome and PrincipeUnder Discussion
SenegalUnder Discussion
SeychellesUnder Discussion
Sierra LeoneUnder Discussion
SingaporeUnder Discussion
SlovakiaUnder Discussion
Solomon IslandsUnder Discussion
SomaliaUnder Discussion
South SudanUnder Discussion
SudanUnder Discussion
TanzaniaUnder Discussion
Timor-LesteUnder Discussion
TogoUnder Discussion
TongaUnder Discussion
Trinidad and TobagoUnder Discussion
TuvaluUnder Discussion
UgandaUnder Discussion
UruguayUnder Discussion
VanuatuUnder Discussion
YemenUnder Discussion
ZambiaUnder Discussion

Uruguay’s 2030 target might be the earliest, but it is not yet set in stone. The earliest commitment actually enshrined in law is Sweden’s 2045 target.

Including Sweden, only six countries have passed their carbon neutral targets into law. They include Denmark, France, Hungary, New Zealand, and the UK.

An additional five countries have proposed legislation in the works, including Canada and South Korea, as well as the entirety of the EU.

Meanwhile, 24 countries have their climate targets set as official policy. They include Brazil, China, Germany and the U.S., some of the world’s largest emitters.

99 of the 137 pledges are only under discussion at this time, or more than 72%. That means that they have no official standing as of yet, and are harder to act on. But as time starts to pass, pressure on countries to act on their carbon neutral pledges is beginning to grow.

The National Public Utilities Council is the go-to resource for all things decarbonization in the utilities industry. Learn more.

Support the Future of Data Storytelling

Sorry to interrupt your reading, but we have a favor to ask. At Visual Capitalist we believe in a world where data can be understood by everyone. That’s why we want to build the VC App - the first app of its kind combining verifiable and transparent data with beautiful, memorable visuals. All available for free.

As a small, independent media company we don’t have the expertise in-house or the funds to build an app like this. So we’re asking our community to help us raise funds on Kickstarter.

If you believe in data-driven storytelling, join the movement and back us on Kickstarter!

Thank you.

Support the future of data storytelling, back us on Kickstarter
Click for Comments

Sponsored

ESG Data: The Four Motivations Driving Usage

ESG controversies can damage a company’s value, but ESG data may be able to help manage this risk. What are other reasons for using ESG data?

Published

on

ESG Data: The Four Motivations Driving Usage

Data is key to the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) revolution. Access to granular ESG data can help boost transparency for market participants. Unfortunately, 63% of U.S. and European asset managers say a lack of quantitative data inhibits their ESG implementation.

Being clear on the potential application of this data is equally important.

  • Investors and banks can use ESG data for risk assessment, to spot opportunities, and to push companies for change.
  • Companies can publish their own ESG data, quantify progress on their ESG goals, and use data to inform decisions.
  • Policymakers can use ESG data to inform regulatory frameworks and measure policy effectiveness.

This graphic from ICE, the second in a three part series on the ESG toolkit, explores four primary motivations of ESG data users.

1. Right Thing

The objective: Having a positive social or environmental impact.

For investors, this can involve screening out companies that conflict with their values and selecting companies that align with their ESG objectives.

As another example, it can involve comparing the social impact of municipal bonds. One way investors can measure social impact is through scores that quantify the potential socioeconomic need of an area, using metrics like poverty and education levels. Here are the social impact scores for three actual municipal bonds issued in Florida.

StateBond IssuerSocial Impact Score
(Higher = larger potential impact)
FloridaIssuer #176.5
FloridaIssuer #266.6
FloridaIssuer #343.2

Issuer #1’s bond is projected to have a community impact that is nearly twice as high/positive as Issuer #3’s bond.

For companies, doing the right thing can include assessing their progress on ESG goals and benchmarking themselves to peers. For example, gender and racial representation is a growing area of focus.

2. Risk

The objective: Managing ESG risks, such as climate and reputational risks.

For investors, this can involve back-testing or analysis around specific risk events before they materialize. Here are the risk profiles of two actual municipal bonds in California. The shown bonds are practically identical in many ways, except their wildlife score.

 Issuer #1Issuer #2
Current Coupon Rate5.0%5.0%
Maturity DateAug 01, 2048August 01, 2048
S&P RatingAAAA
Price to Date (Call Date)Aug 01, 2027Aug 01, 2027
Price122.0122.0
Yield1.0%1.0%
Wildfire Score (Higher = more risk)3.62.7

Managing ESG risk can also involve analyzing a company’s policies and governance for weaknesses. This is important as an ESG controversy can have long-lasting effects on the valuation of a company.

In one study, companies with ESG controversies dropped more than 10% in value relative to the S&P 500. They hadn’t fully recovered a year after the incident.

3. Revenue

The objective: Targeting outperformance through ESG analysis.

Selecting companies with strong ESG data can align with long-term growth trends and may help boost performance. For heavy emitting industries, research indicates that European companies with lower emissions trade at much higher valuations. The chart below shows companies’ price-to-book ratio relative to the Stoxx 600* sector median.

 UtilitiesEnergyMaterials
Above Median Emission Intensity (Bad)1.91.12.0
Below Median Emissions Intensity (Good)2.71.92.1

*The Stoxx 600 Index represents large, mid and small capitalization companies across 17 countries of the European region: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

Energy companies with low emissions trade at a valuation nearly two times higher than energy companies with high emissions.

4. Regulation

The objective: Understanding and complying with relevant ESG regulation.

The International Sustainability Standards Board has announced a global reporting proposal aligned with the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD). In addition, a growing number of jurisdictions will require organizational reporting that aligns with the TCFD.

  • Brazil
  • European Union
  • Hong Kong
  • Japan
  • New Zealand
  • Singapore
  • Switzerland
  • UK

Not only that, a European Union regulation known as Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation (SFDR) came into effect in 2021. It seeks greater transparency in disclosures from firms marketing investment products. Even firms located outside the EU could be impacted if they serve EU customers. In total, the market cap of these non-EU companies exposed to SFDR amounts to $3.2 trillion.

Matching ESG Data with Motivation

There will be growing demand for transparent data as ESG investing flourishes. To remain competitive, investors, policymakers, and companies need access to ESG data that meets their unique objectives.

In Part 3 of the ESG Toolkit series sponsored by ICE, we’ll look at key sustainability index types.

Continue Reading

Sponsored

The Hierarchy of Zero Waste

In a world that generates 2 billion tonnes of waste every year, waste management has become a global concern. Here are some strategies to help guide zero waste policies.

Published

on

How-to-achieve-zero-waste

The Hierarchy of Zero Waste

Many cities have set ambitious zero waste targets in the upcoming decades.

The idea is to have communities where waste generation is avoided, and products are shared, reused, or refurbished.

This graphic, sponsored by Northstar Clean Technologies, shows the main strategies and hierarchy to guide zero waste policies.

What is Zero Waste?

In a world that generates approximately 2 billion tons of waste every year, waste management has become a global concern. Thus, countries and cities are increasing efforts to reduce or even eliminate waste when possible.

The Zero Waste International Alliance defines zero waste as “the conservation of all resources  by means of responsible production, consumption, reuse, and recovery of products, packaging, and materials without burning and with no discharges to land, water, or air that threaten the environment or human health.”

Becoming a zero waste community, however, is a complex task.

Currently, Sweden recycles 99% of locally-produced waste and is considered the best country in the world when it comes to recycling and reusing waste. However, such results only came after almost 40 years of recycling and reuse policies.

In line with this, here are seven commonly accepted steps you can use to achieve zero waste:

1. Rethink, Redesign Products

The global population consumes 110 billion tons of materials each year, but only 8.6% is reused or recycled. In a zero waste society, single-use products are avoided and products are designed with sustainable practices and materials.

2. Reduce

Consumption must be planned carefully to reduce the unnecessary use of materials. Consumers must choose products that maximize the usable lifespan and opportunities for continuous reuse. Companies must minimize the quantity and toxicity of materials used.

3. Reuse

The value of products is maintained by reusing, repairing, or refurbishing for alternative uses.

4. Recycle

Products are diverted from waste streams and recirculated into use. Resilient local markets are developed, allowing the highest and best use of materials.

5. Material Recovery

Component materials like cement, metals, or asphalt are recovered from mixed waste and collected for other applications.

In the U.S. alone, around 12 million tons of asphalt shingle tear-off waste and installation scrap are generated from roof installation each year. Currently, more than 90% of this is discarded in landfills. This material can be repurposed to create new products like liquid asphalt, fiber, and aggregate.

6. Residuals Management

Waste is biologically stabilized and sent to responsibly managed landfills.

7. Unacceptable

The production of materials that are not recoverable and can negatively impact the environment must be avoided.

Reducing our Climate Impact

Reducing, recycling, and recovering materials can be a key part of a climate change strategy to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, about 42% of all greenhouse gas emissions are caused by the production and use of goods, including food, products, and packaging.

Even though 100% zero waste may sound difficult to achieve in the near future, a zero waste approach is essential to reduce our impact on the environment.

Northstar Clean Technologies aims to become the leading recovery and reprocessing company for asphalt shingles in North America.

Continue Reading

Subscribe

Popular