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Is Short Selling Stocks Worth It?

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For most investors, buying and holding a stock is extremely intuitive.

When you go long, you are betting on that particular company’s success. You are hoping that the market values the stock higher in the future than they do today. Then, when you sell your stake in the company, you’ll realize those gains for a profit.

What is less intuitive is the practice of short selling – or betting against a specific stock or security. While the concept may seem simple at first glance, the actual mechanics behind it are much more complicated for an entry-level investor to understand.

Further, short selling has all kinds of intrinsic risks and costs that need to be understood before it should be used as a tactic. Not grasping these risks can lead to all kinds of horror stories.

Is Short Selling Stocks Worth It?

Today’s infographic comes from StocksToTrade.com, and it addresses the question of whether the risk of short selling is worth the potential payoff.

Our thoughts? Short selling is a tactic used by intermediate to advanced traders, and it should only be attempted by someone who understands the mechanics and risks behind it. Under those circumstances, it can be a useful way to hedge or to profit in a down market.

Is Short Selling Stocks Worth It?

Is short selling worth it? It likely depends on your level of sophistication and risk tolerance.

The Risks of Short Selling

Here are the specific risks of short selling that every investor should be aware of:

  • Losses can keep mounting. The maximum profit you can make is capped at 100% – but if a stock keeps increasing in price, losses can accumulate far beyond that.
  • Additional costs. Short selling has a different set of costs than simply buying a stock. These include margin interest, stock borrowing costs, and dividends.
  • Short squeezes and other events. Stocks with high demand for shorting can have a “short squeeze” – an event that forces short sellers to close out their short positions. This can add even more upward pressure on the stock.
  • Timing is crucial. Over time, generally markets have moved upwards. Even if your short play is a good idea, the market could continue to carry the stock in the interim.

Got a shorting success or horror story? Feel free to share it in the comments below.

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Investor Education

The Top 5 Reasons Clients Fire a Financial Advisor

Firing an advisor is often driven by more than cost and performance factors. Here are the top reasons clients ‘break up’ with their advisors.

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The following content is sponsored by Morningstar
This circle graphic shows the top reasons for firing a financial advisor.

The Top 5 Reasons Clients Fire a Financial Advisor

What drives investors to fire a financial advisor?

From saving for a down payment to planning for retirement, clients turn to advisors to guide them through life’s complex financial decisions. However, many of the key reasons for firing a financial advisor stem from emotional factors, and go beyond purely financial motivations.

We partnered with Morningstar to show the top reasons clients fire an advisor to provide insight on what’s driving investor behavior.

What Drives Firing Decisions?

Here are the top reasons clients terminated their advisor, based on a survey of 184 respondents:

Reason for Firing% of Respondents
Citing This Reason
Type of Motivation
Quality of financial advice
and services
32%Emotion-based reason
Quality of relationship21%Emotion-based reason
Cost of services17%Financial-based reason
Return performance11%Financial-based reason
Comfort handling financial
issues on their own
10%Emotion-based reason

Numbers may not total 100 due to rounding. Respondents could select more than one answer.

While firing an advisor is rare, many of the primary drivers behind firing decisions are also emotionally driven.

Often, advisors were fired due to the quality of the relationship. In many cases, this was due to an advisor not dedicating enough time to fully grasp their personal financial goals. Additionally, wealthier, and more financially literate clients are more likely to fire their advisors—highlighting the importance of understanding the client. 

Key Takeaways

Given these driving factors, here are five ways that advisors can build a lasting relationship through recognizing their clients’ emotional needs:

  • Understand your clients’ deeper goals
  • Reach out proactively
  • Act as a financial coach
  • Keep clients updated
  • Conduct goal-setting exercises on a regular basis

By communicating their value and setting expectations early, advisors can help prevent setbacks in their practice by adeptly recognizing the emotional motivators of their clients.

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Curious about what drives investors to hire a financial advisor? Discover the top 5 reasons here.

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