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Amazon’s Most Notable Acquisitions to Date

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Most Notable Acquisitions by Amazon

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The Briefing

  • Amazon plans to acquire Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) for $8.45 billion
  • This move would add 4,000 films and 17,000 TV shows to Amazon Studios’ content library

Amazon’s Most Notable Acquisitions To Date

Big Tech just keeps getting bigger.

On May 26, 2021, Amazon announced its plan to acquire Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) studios for $8.45 billion, making it the company’s second largest acquisition to date.

Amazon has acquired multiple companies across a variety of sectors from healthcare to entertainment, helping diversify its core revenue. In total, the tech giant has acquired or invested in over 128 different companies over the last 20 years.

Top 10 Amazon Acquisitions by Value

In 2017, Amazon paid $13.7 billion to purchase Whole Foods Market—this remains the company’s largest acquisition to date.

The Whole Foods acquisition provided brick-and-mortar space for Amazon to sell some of its flagship devices, like the Echo Dot. It also allowed Amazon to gather valuable shopping data on its customers, to better understand their offline shopping preferences.

Here’s how Amazon’s top 10 acquisitions by value stack up in comparison:

RankCompany AcquiredAnnounced DateAcquisition Value
#1Whole Foods MarketJun 16, 2017$13.7 billion
#2Metro-Goldwyn-MayerMay 26, 2021$8.5 billion
#3ZooxJun 26, 2020$1.2 billion
#4ZapposJul 22, 2009$1.2 billion
#5RingFeb 27, 2018$970 million
#6PillPackJun 28, 2018$839 million
#7TwitchAug 25, 2014$775 million
#8Kiva SystemsMar 19, 2012$753 million
#9SouqMar 27, 2017$580 million
#10QuidsiNov 8, 2010$545 million

Prior to Wednesday’s announcement, the purchase of robotaxi company Zoox was Amazon’s second largest acquisition. According to their reported agreement, Amazon has the rights to use Zoox’s transport technology for ride-hailing or logistics (delivery) services.

The acquisition of MGM will add 21,000 films and TV shows to Amazon’s content library, helping Amazon keep up with the fierce competition in the content streaming industry. MGM owns the rights to “The Handmaid’s Tale” series and “Shark Tank,” as well as the James Bond and Rocky franchises.

Full List: Amazon’s Most Notable Acquisitions

While far from exhaustive, here’s a look at some of Amazon’s most notable acquisitions since 1998, as shown in the graphic:

YearCompany AcquiredAcquisition ValuePost-Acquisition Status
1998IMDb$55,000,000Active under own name
1999LiveBid.com$300,000,000Incorporated/defunct
1999PlanetAll$280,000,000Incorporated/defunct
1999Alexa Internet$250,000,000Active under own name
1999Junglee$250,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2008Audible$300,000,000Active under own name
2009Zappos$1,200,000,000Active under own name
2010Quidsi$545,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2011LoveFilm$312,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2012Kiva Systems$775,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2014Twitch Interactive$970,000,000Active under own name
2015Elemental Technologies$500,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2015Annapurna Labs$350,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2017Whole Foods Market$13,700,000,000Active under own name
2017Souq.com$580,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2018Ring$839,000,000Active under own name
2018PillPack$753,000,000Active under own name
2019CloudEndure$250,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2019Eero$97,000,000Incorporated/defunct
2020Zoox$1,200,000,000Active under own name
2021Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer$8,450,000,000Active under own name

»Like this? Then you might enjoy this full length article on the Biggest Tech Mergers and Acquisitions of 2020

Where does this data come from?

Source: Crunchbase
Notes: Values are in $USD, non-inflation adjusted

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Datastream

Euro 2020: Qualified Nations and Past Winners

After a year-long delay, the 2020 UEFA European Championship is back with new rules, reduced spectators, and fierce competition.

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Euro 2020 past winners

The Briefing

  • The 2020 UEFA European Football Championship will kick off Friday, June 11th 2021 after a year-long delay due to COVID-19
  • The tournament will take place across 11 host cities and feature new rules, reduced spectators, and fierce competition

The 2020 European Championship Returns with New Rules

After a year-long delay, the 2020 UEFA European Championship is set to kick off what will be the largest international sports tournament to take place since the pandemic.

While the final stage of the tournament typically takes place in one or two nations, this year’s will be played across 11 different countries.

Running from June 11th to July 11th 2021, the opening game between Italy and Turkey will kick off at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, and the final will take place at London’s Wembley Stadium.

COVID-19’s Impact on Teams and Spectators

Aside from the initial year-long delay, COVID-19 has changed how teams and spectators will participate in the tournament.

Squads have been expanded from 23 to 26 players, and coaches will be permitted to call up more players if COVID-19 infections force players into isolation.

For spectators, individual stadiums within host cities have announced varying capacities ranging from 20-100%, with strict stadium entry requirements across the board. Since these capacities are pre-tournament estimates, we’ll have to wait until matchday to see how many ticket-holders are comfortable attending the fixtures in person.

Host Stadium and CitySpectator Capacity
Johann Cruijff ArenA, Amsterdam25-45%
Baku Olympic Stadium, Baku50%
Arena Națională, Bucharest25-45%
Puskás Aréna, BudapestAiming for 100%
Parken Stadium, Copenhagen25-45%
Hampden Park, Glasgow25-45%
Wembley Stadium, LondonMinimum of 25%
Football Arena Munich (Allianz Arena), MunichMinimum of 14,500 spectators (~22%)
Stadio Olimpico, Rome25-45%
Estadio La Cartuja, Seville25-45%
Krestovsky Stadium (Gazprom Arena), Saint Petersburg50%

Source: UEFA

More Substitutions and the Video Assistant Referee System

This edition of the tournament will also feature two new rule changes to the action on the field.

Coaches will now be able to make up to five substitutions (six if the match goes to extra time), a change first introduced in domestic leagues to allow players more rest as match calendars became congested.

Another key change which was already in play at the 2018 FIFA World Cup is the Video Assistant Referee (VAR) system. This system appoints a match official who reviews the head referee’s decisions with video footage, and allows the head referee to conduct an on-field video review and potentially change decisions.

Strong Competition Among Euro 2020’s Favorites

Despite current world champions France remaining as undeniable favorites, bookies are putting England to win the tournament (despite a fairly young squad) partially due to the home field advantage in the semi-finals and final.

Spain, Germany, and Italy remain formidable competitors, and Belgium’s golden generation will have one final shot at silverware after their third place finish at the 2018 FIFA World Cup.

European champions Portugal are another obvious threat, as Cristiano Ronaldo will be looking to become the tournament’s top goalscorer of all time (currently tied with Michel Platini at 9 goals).

While the 2020 edition of UEFA’s European Championship features a variety of on-field and off-the-field changes, the trophy truly feels up for grabs and is a welcome return to international football for fans around the world.

»Like this? Then you might enjoy this article, The Top 10 Football Clubs by Market Value

Where does this data come from?

Source: UEFA

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Datastream

COVID-19 Vaccine Prices: Comparing the U.S. and EU

Compared to America, the EU has paid significantly less for a range of COVID-19 vaccines. Here’s a look at vaccine prices in each region.

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Vaccines Prices

The Briefing

  • The U.S. paid 32.1% more per dose for the Pfizer vaccine, compared to the EU
  • Between the two areas, the Sanofi vaccine has one of the smallest prices gaps of only 12.9%

Comparing COVID Vaccine Prices between the U.S. and EU

Over two billion COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered around the world.

But the price governments have paid for the vaccine varies, depending on the region or country. Here’s a look at five major vaccine manufacturers, and their price per dose in the U.S. compared to the EU.

COVID-19 Vaccine Prices: Cost Per Dose

Generally speaking, the EU has paid significantly less than America for a range of COVID-19 vaccines. Pfizer has the biggest price gap, with the U.S. paying 32.1% more per dose.

ManufacturerU.S. Price (per dose)EU Price (per dose)% Difference U.S. is paying
Pfizer/BioNTech$19.50$14.7632.1%
Moderna$15.00$18.00-20.0%
Sanofi$10.50$9.3012.9%
Johnson & Johnson$10.00$8.5017.6%
AstraZeneca$4.00$3.5014.3%

There are a few factors that might explain the price difference. One is early funding—Germany donated millions towards Pfizer’s development.

And while the U.S. did commit to purchasing hundreds of millions of doses of the Pfizer vaccine, the country didn’t provide any funding for the vaccine’s actual development.

Moderna is the only vaccine on the list that is actually cheaper in the U.S., at $15.00 per dose. However, considering that Moderna’s CEO had initially predicted governments would be charged $25-$37 per dose, it looks like both the U.S. and EU managed to negotiate a good deal.

Immunity is the Biggest Cost Saver

At the end of the day, the cost of the vaccine itself is pretty insignificant compared to the economic and emotional toll of an ongoing pandemic.

For instance, a study out of Harvard University estimated the total economic cost of COVID-19 in the U.S. to be in the $16.1 trillion range.

»Want to learn more? Check out our COVID-19 information hub to help put the past year into perspective

Where does this data come from?

Source: Unicef
Notes: Values are in $USD

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