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Lithium-Cobalt Batteries: Powering the Electric Vehicle Revolution

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The following content is sponsored by Fuse Cobalt.

Lithium-cobalt batteries in electric vehicles

Lithium-cobalt batteries

Lithium-Cobalt Batteries: Powering the EV Revolution

Countries across the globe are working towards a greener future and electric vehicles (EVs) are a key piece of the puzzle.

In fact, the EV revolution is well underway, rising from 17,000 electric cars in 2010 to 7.2 million in 2019—a 423x increase in less than a decade. At the same time, we often take for granted the variety of materials that make modern technology work. Going electric requires the use of strategic minerals, especially cobalt.

Today’s infographic comes to us from Fuse Cobalt and looks into how the cobalt in lithium batteries makes the difference for powerful and reliable battery technology.

Edging Over the Competition: The Lithium-Cobalt Combination

There are five primary lithium battery combinations for EVs, each with pros and cons:

  • Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminum (NCA)
  • Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC)
  • Lithium Manganese Oxide (LMO)
  • Lithium Titanate (LTO)
  • Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP)

From the plethora of lithium-ion battery compositions, EV manufacturers prefer the lithium-cobalt combination. As a result, NCA and NMC batteries are the most prevalent in EVs.

NCA batteriesNMC batteries
Offer high specific energy and power
Allow EVs to travel farther
Offer a similar caliber of performance
Use less cobalt, making them less expensive
More prone to overheating
Use more cobalt, making them more expensive
Higher overall safety
Commonly found in Tesla EVsCommonly found in Nissan, Chevrolet, and BMW EVs

The low energy density and power of the other batteries make them impractical for long-range EVs—and it’s partially due to the lack of cobalt.

Why Lithium-Cobalt?

When it comes to powering EVs, lithium-cobalt batteries are unmatched. Specific properties of cobalt make them stand out from the rest:

  • High energy density
  • Thermal stability
  • High specific power
  • Low self-discharge rate
  • Low weight
  • Recyclability

Not only do lithium-cobalt batteries allow EVs to travel farther, but they also improve safety and sustainability.

Cobalt: The Stable Battery Element

Cobalt’s high energy density allows batteries to pack more energy in smaller spaces, making them lightweight and powerful at the same time. In addition, its ability to withstand high temperatures increases the safety and reliability of EVs.

Furthermore, cobalt increases the longevity of batteries and remains highly recyclable, promoting a more sustainable battery supply chain.

Despite its advantages, EV manufacturers are making efforts to reduce the cobalt content of their batteries for various reasons associated with its supply chain:

  • Cobalt is a by-product of nickel and copper mining, which makes it harder to obtain.
  • Cobalt is expensive, at US$33,000/tonne—more than twice the price of nickel.
  • The general public associates cobalt mining in the Congo with child labor, tough conditions, and corruption.

Although cobalt may be associated with unethical mining practices, it still remains essential to EV manufacturers—as demonstrated by Tesla’s agreement to buy 6,000 tonnes of cobalt annually from mining giant Glencore.

Combating Cobalt’s Ethical Concerns

EV manufacturers and miners have joined forces with organizations that are making efforts to alleviate the ethical issues associated with cobalt mining. These include:

  • Fair Cobalt Alliance
  • Responsible Minerals Initiative
  • Responsible Cobalt Initiative
  • Clean Cobalt Initiative

As these initiatives progress, we may see a future with ethically mined cobalt in EV batteries, including cobalt mined in more jurisdictions outside of the DRC.

For the time being, it’s interesting to see how lithium-cobalt batteries power up an EV.

Breaking Down a Lithium-Cobalt Battery

Lithium-Cobalt batteries have three key components:

  • The cathode is an electrode that carries a positive charge, and is made of lithium metal oxide combinations of cobalt, nickel, manganese, iron, and aluminum.
  • The anode is an electrode that carries a negative charge, usually made of graphite.
  • The electrolyte is a lithium salt in liquid or gel form, and allows the ions to flow from the cathode to the anode (and vice versa).

How it Works

When the battery is charged, lithium ions flow via the electrolyte from the cathode to the anode, where they are stored for usage. Simultaneously, electrons pass through an external circuit and are collected in the anode through a negative current collector.

When the battery is generating an electric current (i.e. discharging), the ions flow via the electrolyte from the anode to the cathode, and the electrons reverse direction along the external circuit, powering up the EV.

The composition of the cathode largely determines battery performance. For EV batteries, this is where the lithium-cobalt combination plays a crucial role.

The EV market could experience colossal growth over the next decade, but it faces several roadblocks. At present, EV charging infrastructure is expensive and not as convenient as the local gas station—and lithium-cobalt batteries could help overcome this obstacle.

Battery Storage: The Future of EV Charging Stations?

There are the two ways to charge an electric vehicle battery:

  1. Alternating Current (AC) chargers provide an alternating current, which periodically reverses direction.
  2. Direct Current (DC) fast chargers provide direct current that moves only in one direction.

But there’s a catch.

EV batteries can only store energy in the form of direct current. To charge an EV battery, the onboard charger must convert the alternating current from AC chargers into direct current, increasing charging times substantially.

Today, EV chargers are available in three different types:

Type of ChargerDescriptionMax energy drawn per hourCharge time
(60-kWH EV battery)
Alternating Current (AC) Level 1Charge via a 120-volt AC plug
1.4kW2,400 minutes
Alternating Current (AC) Level 2Charge via a 240-volt AC plug7.2kW500 minutes
Direct Current (DC)Charge EVs rapidly, but are more expensive to install and use50-350kWRange between 10-75 minutes

Meanwhile, several roadblocks still discourage EV buyers, from the lack of charging infrastructure to long charging times.

Stationary battery storage could be the solution.

Stationary Battery Storage: Solving the EV Charging Enigma

Charged batteries can provide EVs with direct current without drawing power from the grid during times of high demand. This can significantly reduce the demand charges of electricity, which account for a large portion of a charging station’s electricity bill.

The highest rate of electricity usage at a particular time determines the demand charges, separate from the cost of actual energy consumed. In other words, demand charges can be astronomical at times when multiple vehicles are charged via power from the grid.

Stationary battery storage systems could be charged from the grid at times of low demand, and used to provide direct current to vehicles during times of high demand.

As a result, this could dramatically reduce charging times as well as the cost of electricity.

Enabling Stationary Battery Storage

Developing stationary battery storage systems on a large scale is expensive. Lithium-cobalt batteries could mitigate these costs through their recyclability.

Unless damaged beyond repair, recycling companies can refurbish lithium-cobalt battery packs for a second life as stationary storage systems.

Re-using batteries promotes a circular economy and reduces waste, pollution, and costs. Not only would this improve charging infrastructure, but it would also create a more sustainable supply chain for EV batteries.

Lithium-Cobalt Batteries: Here to Stay

Despite efforts to reduce the cobalt contents in batteries, the lithium-cobalt combination remains the optimal technology for EV batteries.

Growth is imminent in the EV market, and lithium-cobalt batteries could take center stage in improving both vehicle performance, and charging infrastructure.

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The Carbon Footprint of Trucking: Driving Toward A Cleaner Future

The impact of booming ecommerce and international trade on trucking’s carbon footprint and GHG emissions is heavy—but there are solutions.

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The Carbon Footprint of Trucking: Towards a Cleaner Future

The pandemic may have temporarily curbed greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, but even a global recession can’t negate the impact of transportation—especially the carbon footprint of trucking.

In 2020, lockdowns resulted in an 8% average global decrease in GHG emissions over the first half of the year, when compared to 2019.

As this infographic from dynaCERT shows, trucking remains a significant contributor of GHGs amid booming ecommerce and increased international trade. But innovative solutions can help.

GHGs and the Impact of Trucking

Between 2005 and 2012, global GHG emissions plateaued but have risen every year since.

This growth is not expected to slow in the coming years. Between 2019 and 2050, the amount of atmospheric CO2 is projected to nearly double, from 4.5 to 8.2 gigatons.

Carbon dioxide is not the only substance emitted by trucking that’s detrimental to the environment:

Greenhouse Gases (GHGs)Black Carbon (BC)

  • Include carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4)

  • Trap heat in Earth’s atmosphere resulting in a greenhouse effect, or “global warming”

  • Emitted during processes like combustion and livestock farming, and can remain suspended in the atmosphere for decades or even centuries


  • Fine particulate air pollution also known as "soot"

  • Emitted by combustion engines, BC is the second-largest contributor to climate change after CO2

  • BC can remain in the atmosphere for weeks before falling to Earth in rain or snow

Road vehicles have been major contributors to GHG and BC emissions for decades—particularly heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) and diesel-engine vehicles, like those used for long-haul trucking.

Below is a snapshot of trucking’s global carbon footprint, beginning with global road emissions:

Global Road TransportationHeavy-duty Vehicles (Trucks)Diesel Engines

  • Creates nearly 30% of all global CO2 emissions


  • Responsible for 80% of the global rise in GHGs (1970-2020)


  • Contributed 30% of all road transport CO2 emissions in 2015


  • Expected to contribute 41% of all road-vehicle CO2 emissions by 2030

  • Responsible for upwards of 80% of black carbon emissions

  • Larger contributors of CO2 and black carbon than gasoline engines and emit 10 times more N2O


  • Diesel HDVs contributed 86% of N2O emissions in 2015


  • 78% of all on-road diesel black carbon emissions in 2017 were emitted by diesel HDVs

Industry Impact: Logistics and Shopping Show No Signs of Stopping

Ecommerce has become one of the most popular online activities. As a result, we’ve become more dependent on trucking—long-haul and last-mile—for the delivery of our goods, both personal and for business.

That trend is expected to continue:

  • By 2040, it’s estimated that 95% of all purchases will be facilitated by ecommerce
  • By 2022, e-retail revenues are projected to double from $3.53 trillion in 2019 to $6.54 trillion
  • Logistics is already a $6.5 trillion industry, of which trucking makes up 43%

Combined with international trade, the impact on long-haul and last-mile transport—and CO2 emissions—becomes more pronounced every year, and has accounted for the 80% rise in worldwide GHG emissions from 1970 to 2010.

Although last-mile transport is increasingly reliant on electric vehicles, long-haul trucking still relies heavily on fossil fuels that emit GHGs like CO2.

As a result, road freight’s contribution to CO2 emissions is projected to grow to 56% by 2050.

The Carbon Market: Reducing Emissions and Improving Bottom Lines

In 1997, the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) developed a carbon credit proposal—the Kyoto Protocol—to reduce global carbon emissions. It has guided policies ever since, leading to a proliferation of green strategies that mitigate climate risk and improve business operations.

Companies can leverage this opportunity with a multi-pronged, integrated approach that results in a patented way to harness the carbon market, while improving operations and bottom lines:

The Carbon MarketTechnological Solutions & Carbon Credits

  • Carbon credits are released to companies, helping to reduce GHG emissions by incentivizing environmental measures


  • Allows for efficiencies and credit trading

  • By embracing technology that improves fuel efficiency and optimizes fleets, companies reduce emissions while storing credits for trading


  • Aided by dynaCERT and certified by Verra, extra carbon credits can be captured at a 50/50 shared value


  • Simultaneously, emission-reduction technology and routing software optimizes fleets, reduces GHGs, and enables carbon credit accumulation and trading


  • Responsible for upwards of 80% of black carbon emissions

The benefits of integrated solutions range from improved driver safety and retention to optimized routes, fuel savings, and carbon credit accumulation.

Heavy-Duty Solutions: Driving a Cleaner Future

The long-term impact of the ecommerce boom on CO2 emissions remains to be seen. But it’s coming up quickly on the horizon.

When the weight of the pandemic is lifted, we are likely to encounter more than a transformed economy. An evolving global transport network—supported by technological innovation and new policies like those planned by the U.S. Biden government—is likely to enable more opportunities on the carbon market and pave the way for a greener future.

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More Than Precious: Silver’s Role in the New Energy Era (Part 3 of 3)

Long known as a precious metal, silver in solar and EV technologies will redefine its role and importance to a greener economy.

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Silver More Than Precious

Silver’s Role in the New Energy Era (Part 3 of 3)

Silver is one of the first metals that humans discovered and used. Its extensive use throughout history has linked its name to its monetary value. However, as we have advanced technologically, so have our uses for silver. In the future, silver will see a surge in demand from solar and electric vehicle (EV) technologies.

Part 1 and Part 2 of the Silver Series showcased its monetary legacy as a safe haven asset as a precious metal and why now is its time to shine.

Part 3 of the Silver Series comes to us from Endeavour Silver, and it outlines silver’s role in the new energy era and how it is more than just a precious metal.

A Sterling Reputation: Silver’s History in Technologies

Silver along with gold, copper, lead and iron, was one of the first metals known to humankind. Archaeologists have uncovered silver coins and objects dating from before 4,000 BC in Greece and Turkey. Since then, governments and jewelers embraced its properties to mint currency and craft jewelry.

This historical association between silver and money is recorded across multiple languages. The word silver itself comes from the Anglo-Saxon language, seolfor, which itself comes from ancient Germanic silabar.

Silver’s chemical symbol, “Ag”, is an abbreviation of the Latin word for silver, argentum. The Latin word originates from argunas, a Sanskrit word which means shining. The French use argent as the word for money and silver. Romans bankers and silver traders carried the name argentarius.

While silver’s monetary meanings still stand today, there have been hints of its use beyond money throughout history. For centuries, many cultures used silver containers and wares to store wine, water, and food to prevent spoilage.

During bouts of bubonic plague in Europe, children of wealthy families sucked on silver spoons to preserve their health, which gave birth to the phrase “born with a silver spoon in your mouth.”

Medieval doctors invented silver nitrate used to treat ulcers and burns, a practice that continues to this day. In the 1900s, silver found further application in healthcare. Doctors used to administer eye drops containing silver to newborns in the United States. During World War I, combat medics, doctors, and nurses would apply silver sutures to cover deep wounds.

Silver’s shimmer also made an important material in photography up until the 1970s. Silver’s reflectivity of light made it popular in mirror and building windows.

Now, a new era is rediscovering silver’s properties for the next generation of technology, making the metal more than precious.

Silver in the New Energy Era: Solar and EVs

Silver’s shimmering qualities foreshadowed its use in renewable technologies. Among all metals, silver has the highest electrical conductivity, making it an ideal metal for use in solar cells and the electronic components of electric vehicles.

Silver in Solar Photovoltaics

Conductive layers of silver paste within the cells of a solar photovoltaic (PV) cell help to conduct the electricity within the cell. When light strikes a PV, the conductors absorb the energy and electrons are set free.

Silver’s conductivity carries and stores the free electrons efficiently, maximizing the energy output of a solar cell. According to one study from the University of Kent, a typical solar panel can contain as much as 20 grams of silver.

As the world adopts solar photovoltaics, silver could see dramatic demand coming from this form of renewable energy.

Silver in Electric Vehicles

Silver’s conductivity and corrosion resistance makes its use in electronics critical, and electric vehicles are no exception. Virtually every electrical connection in a vehicle uses silver.

Silver is a critical material in the automotive sector, which uses over 55 million ounces of the metal annually. Auto manufacturers apply silver to the electrical contacts in powered seats and windows and other automotive electronics to improve conductivity.

A Silver Intensive Future

A green future will require metals and will redefine the role for many of them. Silver is no exception. Long known as a precious metal, silver also has industrial applications metal for an eco-friendly future.

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