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How Investment Goals Vary by Country and Age

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How Investment Goals Vary by Country and Age

How Investment Goals Vary by Country and Age

It goes without saying that investors want to see their money grow.

However, it turns out that why investors want their money to grow changes considerably, depending on who you are talking to.

Investment Goals by Geography

Today’s infographic from Raconteur first shows why people invest based on country of residence.

In the following table, we’ll show selected data to illustrate an interesting contrast between North American, Asian, and European cultures:

CountryPrimary Investing GoalPercentage
CanadaSaving for retirement78%
USASaving for retirement71%
UKSaving for retirement71%
Hong KongSaving for retirement48%
GermanySaving for retirement40%
FranceSaving for retirement27%
UAESaving to start a business31%
ChinaBeneficiaries / estate planning42%

In Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom, saving for retirement is the primary investment goal for 70% or more of all respondents. However, in Europe and Asia, there is a much wider diversity of investment goals.

In Germany and France, for example, close to a quarter of respondents mentioned that saving for an emergency was their primary goal, behind saving for retirement. Meanwhile, in the UAE and in China, the primary investment goal was not retirement – it was instead saving to start a business (UAE) and setting up family and/or beneficiaries for success (China).

Goals by Generation

It’s not just geographical boundaries, the level of economic development, and the local culture that impacts investment goals.

Another factor is generational: Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials are at very different stages of life, and each generation has their own quirky preferences, anyway.

Statement (I want to…)Highest AgreeanceLowest agreeance
Retire comfortablyBoomersMillennials
Make sure money is safeBoomersMillennials
Preserve as much wealth as possibleBoomersMillennials
Pass on wealth to my heirs and othersMillennialsGen Xers
Ensure I have funds to pay for important eventsMillennialsBoomers
Invest at the lowest cost possibleBoomersGen Xers
Have the best advice possible and am willing to payMillennialsBoomers
Retire earlyGen XersBoomers
Not miss out on market opportunitiesGen XersBoomers
Choose riskier investments to build wealth fastMillennialsBoomers

Not surprisingly, as people get older, their goals shift away from making immediate big-ticket purchases, and holding riskier investments for a higher rate of return. Later on in life, goals are more focused on retirement and maximizing wealth.

That said, there are some anomalies in the above data that are interesting.

For example, Millennials – not Baby Boomers – are most concerned about building wealth to pass onto their heirs. Finally, it is the Millennials that are willing to pay the most for investment advice, in order to get the best possible result.

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Ranked: The Largest U.S. Corporations by Number of Employees

We visualized the top U.S. companies by employees, revealing the massive scale of retailers like Walmart, Target, and Home Depot.

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The Largest U.S. Corporations by Number of Employees

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on Apple or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Revenue and profit are common measures for measuring the size of a business, but what about employee headcount?

To see how big companies have become from a human perspective, we’ve visualized the top U.S. companies by employees. These figures come from companiesmarketcap.com, and were accessed in March 2024. Note that this ranking includes publicly-traded companies only.

Data and Highlights

The data we used to create this list of largest U.S. corporations by number of employees can be found in the table below.

CompanySectorNumber of Employees
WalmartConsumer Staples2,100,000
AmazonConsumer Discretionary1,500,000
UPSIndustrials500,000
Home DepotConsumer Discretionary470,000
ConcentrixInformation Technology440,000
TargetConsumer Staples440,000
KrogerConsumer Staples430,000
UnitedHealthHealth Care400,000
Berkshire HathawayFinancials383,000
StarbucksConsumer Discretionary381,000
Marriott InternationalConsumer Discretionary377,000
CognizantInformation Technology346,600

Retail and Logistics Top the List

Companies like Walmart, Target, and Kroger have a massive headcount due to having many locations spread across the country, which require everything from cashiers to IT professionals.

Moving goods around the world is also highly labor intensive, explaining why UPS has half a million employees globally.

Below the Radar?

Two companies that rank among the largest U.S. corporations by employees which may be less familiar to the public include Concentrix and Cognizant. Both of these companies are B2B brands, meaning they primarily work with other companies rather than consumers. This contrasts with brands like Amazon or Home Depot, which are much more visible among average consumers.

A Note on Berkshire Hathaway

Warren Buffett’s company doesn’t directly employ 383,000 people. This headcount actually includes the employees of the firm’s many subsidiaries, such as GEICO (insurance), Dairy Queen (retail), and Duracell (batteries).

If you’re curious to see how Buffett’s empire has grown over the years, check out this animated graphic that visualizes the growth of Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio from 1994 to 2022.

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