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The Evolution of Computer Science in One Infographic

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We take computing power for granted today.

That’s because computers are literally everywhere around us. And thanks to advances in technology and manufacturing, the cost of producing semiconductors is so low that we’ve even started turning things like toys and streetlights into computers.

But how and where did this familiar new era start?

The History of Computer Science

Today’s infographic comes to us from Computer Science Zone, and it describes the journey of how we got to today’s tech-oriented consumer society.

It may surprise you to learn that the humble and abstract groundwork of what we now call computer science goes all the way back to the beginning of the 18th century.

The Evolution of Computer Science in One Infographic

Incredibly, the history of computing goes all the way back to a famous mathematician named Gottfried Wilhem Leibniz.

Leibniz, a polymath living in the Holy Roman Empire in an area that is now modern-day Germany, was quite the talent. He independently developed the field of differential and integral calculus, developed his own mechanical calculators, and was a primary advocate of Rationalism.

It is arguable, however, that the modern impact of his work mostly stems from his formalization of the binary numerical system in 1703. He even envisioned a machine of the future that could use such a system of logic.

From Vacuums to Moore’s Law

The first computers, such as the IBM 650, used vacuum tube circuit modules for logic circuitry. Used up until the early 1960s, they required vast amounts of electricity, failed often, and required constant inspection for defective tubes. They were also the size of entire rooms.

Luckily, transistors were invented and then later integrated into circuits – and 1958 saw the production of the very first functioning integrated circuit by Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments. Shortly after, Gordon Moore of Intel predicted that the number of transistors per integrated circuit would double every year, a prediction now known as “Moore’s Law”.

Moore’s Law, which suggests exponential growth, continued for 50 years until it started scratching its upper limits.

It can’t continue forever. The nature of exponentials is that you push them out and eventually disaster happens.

– Gordon Moore in 2005

It’s now been argued by everyone from The Economist to the CEO of Nvidia that Moore’s Law is over for practical intents and purposes – but that doesn’t mean it’s the end of the road for computer science. In fact, it’s just the opposite.

The Next Computing Era

Computers no longer take up rooms – even very powerful ones now fit in the palm of your hand.

They are cheap enough to put in refrigerators, irrigation systems, thermostats, smoke detectors, cars, streetlights, and clothing. They can even be embedded in your skin.

The coming computing era will be dominated by artificial intelligence, the IoT, robotics, and unprecedented connectivity. And even if things are advancing at a sub-exponential rate, it will still be an incredible next step in the evolution of computer science.

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What is the Median Pay of Magnificent Seven Companies?

The Magnificent Seven companies are fueling stock market gains. In this graphic, we show the median pay of each company in 2023.

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This circle graphic shows the median pay of employees at the Magnificent Seven companies.

What is the Median Pay of Magnificent Seven Companies?

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

The Magnificent Seven are lifting the stock market to new highs, led by Nvidia, Microsoft, Apple, and Alphabet in particular.

In May alone, these tech giants added $1.4 trillion in market capitalization to the S&P 500—surpassing the combined gains of 296 other stocks during the same period. Notably, Nvidia contributed to more than half of this rise. As tech stocks boom, many are offering robust salaries with substantial stock option plans.

This graphic shows the median pay of the Magnificent Seven companies in 2023, based on analysis from The Wall Street Journal and MyLogIQ.

The Highest Paying Companies in the Magnificent Seven

Below, we show the median employee pay of the Magnificent Seven companies in 2023:

CompanyMedian Employee Pay
2023
CEO Total Pay
2023
Meta$379,050$24.4M
Alphabet$315,531$8.8M
Nvidia$266,939$34.2M
Microsoft$193,770$48.5M
Apple$94,118$63.2M
Tesla$45,811$0M
Amazon$36,274$1.4M

Data for Microsoft is from SEC filings. Total CEO pay includes equity awards and cash pay.

Meta ranks as the highest overall, with a median pay of $379,050, which is more than six times the national median salary.

Not only is it the leading company in the Magnificent Seven, it has one of the highest median pay across S&P 500 companies. Between 2022 and 2023, employee pay increased 28%, following four rounds of layoffs that slashed thousands of employees in its “year of efficiency”.

Following Meta is Google’s parent company, Alphabet, with a median pay of $315,531. The company operates a hybrid work policy, requiring employees to be in the office about three days a week. This mirrors a trend seen across Amazon and Salesforce to encourage in-person collaboration.

At Nvidia, employees received a median pay of $266,939, fueled by its soaring share price. Last year, over $300 million in value was delivered to its staff under its employee stock purchase plan. Along with a competitive pay package, the company offers an unlimited vacation policy along with 22-weeks of paid parental leave.

Falling near the bottom of the pack is Tesla, where the median salary for employees is $45,811. The automotive sector is notorious for steep wage gaps between CEOs and workers, with CEOs often earning 300 times more than the median employee.

In 2023, Tesla CEO Elon Musk earned no compensation, and is instead paid through incentive-based stock options. Recently, a judge invalidated a staggering $56 billion pay package for the executive, deeming it unfair to the company’s shareholders. This pay package was awarded in 2018, with stipulations that Tesla meet certain performance requirements over a 10-year timeframe.

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