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Generation Z: Marketing’s Next Big Audience

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Generation Z: Marketing's Next Big Audience

Generation Z: Marketing’s Next Big Audience

Move over Millennials, there’s already a newer generation businesses are interested in, and it’s called “Gen Z”.

If you were not familiar with this new generation label, no one would blame you. Generation Z is currently under construction, with a vague birth range that starts in the mid-90’s to present day. This generation is the most tech savvy ever, period. They were born with cell phones, video games, non-dialup internet, and all the other tech perks you weren’t lucky enough to have when you were young.

However, it’s not all fun and tech games for Gen Z. As the first wave of Gen Z is set to graduate college within the next few years, they will be entering a competitive realm with fewer opportunities. The previous generation of Millennials still find themselves underemployed and competing for the same entry-level positions. Couple that with the ever-rising cost of living and housing, there is a bleak outlook for these youngsters.

Businesses will need to communicate with Gen Z differently than other groups. Investors should watch for macro trends in Gen Z demographics and psychographics to see what opportunities are worth taking advantage of. Here are some basics on Gen Z:

For starters, they are a multi-screen user demographic. As the infographic suggests, Gen Z’ers prefer to multi-task on up to 5 screens. The best way to get to their wallet is through the devices in their pockets. The majority of their screen time is spent on smartphones. Also, video content is huge for educating and connecting this demographic. It makes sense, as the average American’s attention is only 8 seconds and most people are visual learners; long winded messages or blocks of text are just not effective at getting people’s attention.

Although Gen Z’s purchasing power has not come to fruition yet, it is important for businesses to connect with them early on and maintain that connection as their incomes grow. Youth today want to connect and trust those that they buy from and do business with. Relationships are paramount for business, and Gen Z is no exception.

 

Original infographic from: Marketo

 

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Science

Visualizing the Average Lifespans of Mammals

While smaller animals such as weasels typically live 1-2 years, larger counterparts can thrive for decades.

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Infographic depicting the average lifespans of diverse mammals.

Visualizing the Average Lifespans of Mammals

This was originally posted on our Voronoi app. Download the app for free on iOS or Android and discover incredible data-driven charts from a variety of trusted sources.

Mammals, though comprising a small fraction of Earth’s creatures, hold vital ecological roles globally. They are crucial for maintaining ecosystem health through services like pollination, seed dispersal, and predator-prey dynamics.

In this visualization, we depict the average lifespans of mammals, using data from Discover Wildlife and the United Nations.

Human Lifespans on the Rise

Defined as warm-blooded creatures with hair or fur, mammals nurse their young with milk from mammary glands. While smaller animals such as weasels typically live 1-2 years, larger counterparts like elephants can thrive for decades, and bowhead whales can live for 200 years, or even longer.

AnimalAverage lifespan (years)
Weasel1 to 2
Hedgehog3
Wolverine12
Tiger14
Brown bear25
Lowland tapir30
Western gorilla35
Brandt's bat41
Humans (1950)47
Elephant56
Humans (2022)72
Bowhead whale200

Notably, human lifespans have experienced a remarkable surge. According to the UN Population Division, the global average life expectancy has surged from 47 years in 1950 to 72 years in 2022, marking a 25-year increase. This is attributed to advancements in nutrition, medication, and essential resources.

However, as human longevity flourishes, it can have an adverse effect on wildlife mammal populations. To put this into numbers, over the past 100,000 years, the surge in human population has precipitated an 85% reduction in wild mammal biomass.

Today, livestock dominates 62% of the world’s mammal biomass, with humans accounting for 34%, while wild mammals comprise only 4%.

Despite a decline in mammal diversity, the total biomass of terrestrial mammals has significantly increased, expanding approximately ninefold over the past 10,000 years.

Curious to learn more about mammals? Check out this graphic that shows the biomass of all the world’s mammals.

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