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The Future of Collaboration in the Artificial Intelligence Era

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The Future of Collaboration in the Artificial Intelligence Era

The Future of Collaboration in the Artificial Intelligence Era

How humans collaborate with one another has been closely linked to technological progress.

Before the invention of the telephone, we had to be in the same room to communicate in real-time – and prior to the internet, we had to be in the same building to share our designs, new ideas, or other documents.

Collaboration has always been a moving target, and in modern times we shouldn’t be surprised that new technological innovations are again shifting how humans work and coordinate together.

The New Collaboration Cycle

Today’s infographic comes to us from Schneider Electric, and it shows that humans are no longer making things using a linear approach.

Instead, modern collaboration is a cyclical process with no defined start or end points – and it often involves more users and stakeholders, continuous access, and an increasingly decentralized workforce.

The 24/7 Knowledge Factory

All around the world, the way that teams work together is changing.

Instead of always being centralized at a local level, teams are adding talent from around the world who bring diverse perspectives and new ideas to the table.

The modern organization never sleeps – it has people from different countries, time zones, and cultures all working together to create new designs or products simultaneously.

Collaboration on projects is happening in real-time, at all times of the day, and this has several benefits. It brings together a broader range of skills and perspectives, makes teams more customer-centric, reduces errors and wasted money, and enhances both decision-making and product development cycles.

Working Together is Changing

How are teams collaborating 24/7 in real-time from locations around the world?

VR/AR
Designers, engineers, and other team members can collaborate in parallel, using mixed reality as a common medium.

Collaborative Intelligence (AI)
Multi-agent, distributed systems where each agent, human or machine, is uniquely positioned, with autonomy to contribute to a problem-solving network.

Advanced Modelling (3D and 4D printing)
Design and manufacturing can be integrated seamlessly, even to customize individual items. 4d printing (fourth dimension: movement) is a new frontier where printed objects adapt to various circumstances.

Crowd-based Collaboration
Design is no longer siloed and can be democratized between different stakeholders. Further, teams can work simultaneously from all over the world.

Computer Supported Collaborative Design (CSCD)
The synchronous sharing of information and interaction with ideas, in an AI-driven, data-intensive environment. Here, problem solving, data and service “agents” support, or replace, labor intensive work and possibly the human traits of intuition and decisi, as well.n making.

The Next Wave

How humans work together is changing, but also shifting is how humans and AI will collaborate together.

The new technological landscape creates many questions and uncertainties for companies today:

  • Will new “collaborative” technologies really change how we engage, and innovate with, our colleagues?
  • Will a hyper-networked, always-engaged global collaborative environment create “too many cooks in the kitchen”?
  • With more opportunity to get involved in processes, how does the role of the end-customer change?
  • Will traditional design and implementation switch to being more service-based, as time goes on?

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The Rise of Online Dating, and the Company That Dominates the Market

For the first time, more people meet online than any other way. Growth in online dating has created a giant market – and one company wants to own it all.

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The Rise of Online Dating, and the One Company That Dominates the Market

Couples used to meet in real life, but now more and more people are “matching” online.

While online dating was once considered taboo, the number of couples meeting online has more than doubled in the last decade to about 1-in-5. Nowadays, you’re much more likely to meet your next partner online rather than through your family or co-workers. But don’t worry, your friends are still a good help too.

The data used in today’s chart is from the “How Couples Meet and Stay Together” survey by Stanford University. This unique dataset charts a significant shift in the way couples meet each other, and demonstrates how our changing communication habits are driving massive growth in the online dating market.

The Rise of Dating Apps

The rise of online dating in the last decade goes hand in hand with the rise of dating apps.

Tinder globally popularized app-based matchmaking when it launched on iPhones in 2012, and later on Android in 2013. Unlike traditional dating websites, which required lengthy profiles and complicated profile searches, Tinder gamified online dating with quick account setups and its “swipe-right-to-like” approach. By 2017, Tinder had grown to 57 million active users across the globe and billions of swipes per day.

Since the launch of Tinder, hundreds of dating services have appeared on app stores worldwide. Investors are taking notice of this booming market, while analysts estimate the global online dating market could be worth $12 billion by next year.

But it might surprise you that despite the growing variety of dating options online, most popular apps are owned by just one group.

The Big Business of Dating Apps: Match Group

Today, nearly all major dating apps are owned by the Match Group, a publicly-traded pure play that was spun out of IAC, a conglomerate controlled by media mogul Barry Diller.

IAC saw the online dating trend early, purchasing early online dating pioneer Match.com way back in 1999. However, with online dating shifting into the mainstream over recent years, the strategy quickly shifted to aggressively buying up major players in the market.

We’re highly acquisitive, and we’re always talking to companies. If you want to sell, you should be talking to us.

–Mandy Ginsberg, Match Group CEO

In addition to its prized app Tinder – which doubled its revenue in 2018 to $805 million – Match Group owns popular online dating services like OkCupid, Plenty of Fish, Hinge, and has even bought out international competitors like Meetic in Europe, and Eureka in Japan. The dating giant reported revenues of $1.73 billion in 2018.

match group timeline chart

According to reports, Match Group now owns more than 45 dating-related businesses, including 25 acquisitions.

As Match Group continues to swallow up the online dating market, it now boasts dating sites or apps in every possible niche – including the four most-used apps in the United States.

Match Group online dating users in U.S.

Despite Match Group’s dominant efforts, there are still two competitors that remain outside the dating giant’s reach.

The One That Got Away

In 2017, Match Group tried to acquire its last major competitor, Bumble – which had grown to over 23 million users in just three years – for $450 million. Bumble rejected the offer and by the next year, Match Group sued Bumble for patent infringement, for what some felt was a bargaining chip to force an acquisition.

Bumble responded with an ad in the Dallas Morning News denouncing Match Group: “We swipe left on your multiple attempts to buy us, copy us, and, now, to intimidate us. We’ll never be yours. No matter the price tag, we’ll never compromise our values.”

It remains to be seen if Match Group will be able to acquire Bumble, but another tech giant’s decision to launch its own dating service has also complicated Match’s conquest of the online dating market.

New Face in Town

In 2018, social media giant Facebook launched its own dating service—potentially leveraging its 2.2 billion active users—to join the online dating market.

While the announcement initially caused Match Group’s stock to drop 21%, it since has rebounded as Facebook has been slow to roll out their service.

Going forward, Match Group’s dominance may be hindered by anti-trust calls in the U.S., Bumble’s growth and direct competition to Tinder, and whether the sleeping giant Facebook can change the global online dating market with its own service.

Who will win our hearts?

Hat tip to Nathan Yau at Flowing Data, who introduced us to the data on how couples meet. His dynamic chart is worth a look as well.

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Animation: The Biggest Tech Companies by Market Cap Over 23 Years

In business, the only constant is change – and for tech companies, this is even more true. Here are the biggest tech companies over 23 years.

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The business world is certainly not a static one.

In the past, we’ve shown that the market leaders in the most stable industries are unlikely to keep their leadership positions over long periods of time.

But limit your window to just the dynamic world of tech and you’ll see an even more extreme example of this inherent volatility. Sometimes companies are able to separate from the rest of the pack for days or months, but it’s never an advantage that lasts for long.

Biggest Tech Companies by Market Cap

Today’s animation was originally posted to Reddit by /r/TheNerdistRedditor and captures the crazy world of tech valuations for public companies.

Watch the intense 1 minute animation below:


Note: the data here only lists companies traded on U.S. exchanges, and does not show every single valuation point.

Over just 23 years, the company topping the list flips eight separate times – and if you were to get more granular with the numbers (looking at daily valuations, for example), you’d see it happen far more often.

Today’s Market Cap Leaders

As we noted above, company valuations are constantly changing – and back in early September 2018, both Apple and Amazon even topped the $1 trillion milestone for a short period of time.

Using the same criteria as the above animation, which is based on U.S. listed companies, here are the top 10 tech companies based on data at time of publication:

RankCompanyTicker(s)Market Cap (March 18, 2019)
#1MicrosoftMSFT$902 billion
#2AppleAAPL$887 billion
#3AmazonAMZN$856 billion
#4AlphabetGOOG, GOOGL$824 billion
#5AlibabaBABA$471 billion
#6FacebookFB$458 billion
#7IntelINTC$243 billion
#8CiscoCSCO$236 billion
#9OracleORCL$192 billion
#10NetflixNFLX$159 billion

Based on March 18, 2019 data

This is not a comprehensive list globally, as it misses companies like Tencent which are listed on other exchanges such as the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Based on recent HKD/USD conversion rates, it’s estimated that Tencent would be roughly worth $450 billion today – good enough for 7th on the list.

Regardless, since change is the only constant in the tech world, it’s fair to say that the above list of the biggest tech companies will likely be much different in just a few months time.

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