Infographic: These Five Cognitive Biases Hurt Investors the Most
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These Five Cognitive Biases Hurt Investors the Most

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There is no shortage of cognitive biases out there that can trip up our brains.

By the last count, there are 188 types of these fallible mental shortcuts in existence, and they constantly impede our ability to make the best decisions about our careers, our relationships, and for building wealth over time.

Biases That Plague Investors

In today’s infographic from StocksToTrade, we dive deeper into five of these cognitive biases – specifically the ones that really seem to throw investors and traders for a loop.

Next time you are about to make a major investing decision, make sure you double-check this list!

The Five Cognitive Biases That Hurt Investors the Most

The moves that may seem instinctual for the average investor may actually be pre-loaded with cognitive biases.

These problems can even plague the most prominent investors in the world – just look at JPMorgan’s Jamie Dimon!

Biases to Avoid

Here are descriptions and examples of the five cognitive biases that can impact investors the most:

Anchoring Bias
The first piece of information you see or hear often ends up being an “anchor” for others that follow.

As an example, if you heard that a new stock was trading at $5.00 – that is the piece of information you may reference whenever thinking about that stock in the future. To avoid this mental mistake: analyze historical data, but don’t hold historical conclusions.

Recency Bias
Recency bias is a tendency to overvalue the latest information available.

If you heard that a CEO is resigning from a company you own shares of, your impulse may be to overvalue this recent news and sell the stock. However, you should be careful, and instead focus on long-term trends and experience to come up with a more measured course of action.

Loss Aversion Bias
No one wants to lose money, but small losses happen all the time even for the best investors – especially on paper.

Loss aversion bias is a tendency to feel the effects of these losses more than wins of equal magnitude, and it can often result in a sub-optimal shift in investing strategy. Investors that are focused only on avoiding losses will miss out on big opportunities for gains.

Confirmation Bias
Taking in information only that confirms your beliefs can be disastrous. It’s tempting, because it is satisfying to see your previous conviction in a positive light – however, it also makes it possible to miss important findings that may help to change your conviction.

Bandwagon Bias
No one wants to get left out, but being the last one to pile onto an opportunity can also be cataclysmic. If you’re going to be a bandwagon jumper, make sure you’re doing it for the right reasons.

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Mapped: GDP Growth Forecasts by Country, in 2023

The global economy faces an uncertain future in 2023. This year, GDP growth is projected to be 2.9%—down from 3.2% in 2022.

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GDP Growth

Mapped: GDP Growth Forecasts by Country, in 2023

This was originally posted on Advisor Channel. Sign up to the free mailing list to get beautiful visualizations on financial markets that help advisors and their clients.

Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine early last year, talk of global recession has dominated the outlook for 2023.

High inflation, spurred by rising energy costs, has tested GDP growth. Tightening monetary policy in the U.S., with interest rates jumping from roughly 0% to over 4% in 2022, has historically preceded a downturn about one to two years later.

For European economies, energy prices are critical. The good news is that prices have fallen recently since March highs, but the continent remains on shaky ground.

The above infographic maps GDP growth forecasts by country for the year ahead, based on projections from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) October 2022 Outlook and January 2023 update.

2023 GDP Growth Outlook

The world economy is projected to see just 2.9% GDP growth in 2023, down from 3.2% projected for 2022.

This is a 0.2% increase since the October 2022 Outlook thanks in part to China’s reopening, higher global demand, and slowing inflation projected across certain countries in the year ahead.

With this in mind, we show GDP growth forecasts for 191 jurisdictions given multiple economic headwinds—and a few emerging bright spots in 2023.

Country / Region2023 Real GDP % Change (Projected)
🇦🇱 Albania2.5%
🇩🇿 Algeria2.6%
🇦🇴 Angola3.4%
🇦🇬 Antigua and Barbuda5.6%
🇦🇷 Argentina*2.0%
🇦🇲 Armenia3.5%
🇦🇼 Aruba2.0%
🇦🇺 Australia*1.6%
🇦🇹 Austria1.0%
🇦🇿 Azerbaijan2.5%
🇧🇭 Bahrain3.0%
🇧🇩 Bangladesh6.0%
🇧🇧 Barbados5.0%
🇧🇾 Belarus0.2%
🇧🇪 Belgium0.4%
🇧🇿 Belize2.0%
🇧🇯 Benin6.2%
🇧🇹 Bhutan4.3%
🇧🇴 Bolivia3.2%
🇧🇦 Bosnia and Herzegovina2.0%
🇧🇼 Botswana4.0%
🇧🇷 Brazil*1.2%
🇧🇳 Brunei Darussalam3.3%
🇧🇬 Bulgaria3.0%
🇧🇫 Burkina Faso4.8%
🇧🇮 Burundi4.1%
🇨🇻 Cabo Verde4.8%
🇨🇲 Cameroon4.6%
🇰🇭 Cambodia6.2%
🇨🇦 Canada*1.5%
🇨🇫 Central African Republic3.0%
🇹🇩 Chad3.4%
🇨🇱 Chile-1.0%
🇨🇳 China*5.3%
🇨🇴 Colombia2.2%
🇰🇲 Comoros3.4%
🇨🇷 Costa Rica2.9%
🇨🇮 Côte d'Ivoire6.5%
🇭🇷 Croatia3.5%
🇨🇾 Cyprus2.5%
🇨🇿 Czech Republic1.5%
🇨🇩 Democratic Republic of the Congo6.7%
🇩🇰 Denmark0.6%
🇩🇯 Djibouti5.0%
🇩🇲 Dominica4.9%
🇩🇴 Dominican Republic4.5%
🇪🇨 Ecuador2.7%
🇪🇬 Egypt*4.0%
🇸🇻 El Salvador1.7%
🇬🇶 Equatorial Guinea-3.1%
🇪🇷 Eritrea2.9%
🇪🇪 Estonia1.8%
🇸🇿 Eswatini1.8%
🇪🇹 Ethiopia5.3%
🇫🇯 Fiji6.9%
🇫🇮 Finland0.5%
🇫🇷 France*0.7%
🇲🇰 North Macedonia3.0%
🇬🇦 Gabon3.7%
Georgia4.0%
Germany*0.1%
Ghana2.8%
Greece1.8%
Grenada3.6%
Guatemala3.2%
Guinea5.1%
Guinea-Bissau4.5%
Guyana25.2%
Haiti0.5%
Honduras3.5%
Hong Kong SAR3.9%
Hungary1.8%
Iceland2.9%
India*6.1%
Indonesia*4.8%
Iraq4.0%
Ireland4.0%
Iran*2.0%
Israel3.0%
Italy*0.6%
Jamaica3.0%
Japan*1.8%
Jordan2.7%
Kazakhstan*4.3%
Kenya5.1%
Kiribati2.4%
South Korea*1.7%
Kosovo3.5%
Kuwait2.6%
Kyrgyz Republic3.2%
Lao P.D.R.3.1%
Latvia1.6%
Lesotho1.6%
Liberia4.2%
Libya17.9%
Lithuania1.1%
Luxembourg1.1%
Macao SAR56.7%
Madagascar5.2%
🇲🇼 Malawi2.5%
🇲🇾 Malaysia*4.4%
🇲🇻 Maldives6.1%
🇲🇱 Mali5.3%
🇲🇹 Malta3.3%
🇲🇭 Marshall Islands3.2%
🇲🇷 Mauritania4.8%
🇲🇺 Mauritius5.4%
🇲🇽 Mexico*1.7%
🇫🇲 Micronesia2.9%
🇲🇩 Moldova2.3%
🇲🇳 Mongolia5.0%
🇲🇪 Montenegro2.5%
🇲🇦 Morocco3.1%
🇲🇿 Mozambique4.9%
🇲🇲 Myanmar3.3%
🇳🇦 Namibia3.2%
🇳🇷 Nauru2.0%
🇳🇵 Nepal5.0%
🇳🇱 Netherlands*0.6%
🇳🇿 New Zealand1.9%
🇳🇮 Nicaragua3.0%
🇳🇪 Niger7.3%
🇳🇬 Nigeria*3.2%
🇳🇴 Norway2.6%
🇴🇲 Oman4.1%
🇵🇰 Pakistan*2.0%
🇵🇼 Palau12.3%
🇵🇦 Panama4.0%
🇵🇬 Papua New Guinea5.1%
🇵🇾 Paraguay4.3%
🇵🇪 Peru2.6%
🇵🇭 Philippines*5.0%
🇵🇱 Poland*0.3%
🇵🇹 Portugal0.7%
🇵🇷 Puerto Rico0.4%
🇶🇦 Qatar2.4%
🇨🇬 Republic of Congo4.6%
🇷🇴 Romania3.1%
🇷🇺 Russia*0.3%
🇷🇼 Rwanda6.7%
🇼🇸 Samoa4.0%
🇸🇲 San Marino0.8%
🇸🇹 São Tomé and Príncipe2.6%
🇸🇦 Saudi Arabia*2.6%
🇸🇳 Senegal8.1%
🇷🇸 Serbia2.7%
🇸🇨 Seychelles5.2%
🇸🇱 Sierra Leone3.3%
🇸🇬 Singapore2.3%
🇸🇰 Slovak Republic1.5%
🇸🇮 Slovenia1.7%
🇸🇧 Solomon Islands2.6%
🇸🇴 Somalia3.1%
🇿🇦 South Africa*1.2%
🇸🇸 South Sudan5.6%
🇪🇸 Spain*1.1%
🇱🇰 Sri Lanka-3.0%
🇰🇳 St. Kitts and Nevis4.8%
🇱🇨 St. Lucia5.8%
🇻🇨 St. Vincent and the Grenadines6.0%
🇸🇩 Sudan2.6%
🇸🇷 Suriname2.3%
🇸🇪 Sweden-0.1%
🇨🇭 Switzerland0.8%
🇹🇼 Taiwan2.8%
🇹🇯 Tajikistan4.0%
🇹🇿 Tanzania5.2%
🇹🇭 Thailand*3.7%
🇧🇸 The Bahamas4.1%
🇬🇲 The Gambia6.0%
🇹🇱 Timor-Leste4.2%
🇹🇬 Togo6.2%
🇹🇴 Tonga2.9%
🇹🇹 Trinidad and Tobago3.5%
🇹🇳 Tunisia1.6%
🇹🇷 Turkey*3.0%
🇹🇲 Turkmenistan2.3%
🇹🇻 Tuvalu3.5%
🇺🇬 Uganda5.9%
🇺🇦 UkraineN/A
🇦🇪 United Arab Emirates4.2%
🇬🇧 United Kingdom*-0.6%
🇺🇲 U.S.*1.4%
🇺🇾 Uruguay3.6%
🇺🇿 Uzbekistan4.7%
🇻🇺 Vanuatu3.1%
🇻🇪 Venezuela6.5%
🇻🇳 Vietnam6.2%
West Bank and Gaza3.5%
🇾🇪 Yemen3.3%
🇿🇲 Zambia4.0%
🇿🇼 Zimbabwe2.8%

*Reflect updated figures from the January 2023 IMF Update.

The U.S. is forecast to see 1.4% GDP growth in 2023, up from 1.0% seen in the last October projection.

Still, signs of economic weakness can be seen in the growing wave of tech layoffs, foreshadowed as a white-collar or ‘Patagonia-vest’ recession. Last year, 88,000 tech jobs were cut and this trend has continued into 2023. Major financial firms have also followed suit. Still, unemployment remains fairly steadfast, at 3.5% as of December 2022. Going forward, concerns remain around inflation and the path of interest rate hikes, though both show signs of slowing.

Across Europe, the average projected GDP growth rate is 0.7% for 2023, a sharp decline from the 2.1% forecast for last year.

Both Germany and Italy are forecast to see slight growth, at 0.1% and 0.6%, respectively. Growth forecasts were revised upwards since the IMF’s October release. However, an ongoing energy crisis exposes the manufacturing sector to vulnerabilities, with potential spillover effects to consumers and businesses, and overall Euro Area growth.

China remains an open question. In 2023, growth is predicted to rise 5.2%, higher than many large economies. While its real estate sector has shown signs of weakness, the recent opening on January 8th, following 1,016 days of zero-Covid policy, could boost demand and economic activity.

A Long Way to Go

The IMF has stated that 2023 will feel like a recession for much of the global economy. But whether it is headed for a recovery or a sharper decline remains unknown.

Today, two factors propping up the global economy are lower-than-expected energy prices and resilient private sector balance sheets. European natural gas prices have sunk to levels seen before the war in Ukraine. During the height of energy shocks, firms showed a notable ability to withstand astronomical energy prices squeezing their finances. They are also sitting on significant cash reserves.

On the other hand, inflation is far from over. To counter this effect, many central banks will have to use measures to rein in prices. This may in turn have a dampening effect on economic growth and financial markets, with unknown consequences.

As economic data continues to be released over the year, there may be a divergence between consumer sentiment and whether things are actually changing in the economy. Where the economy is heading in 2023 will be anyone’s guess.

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