The Future of Work: Five Priorities For Businesses to Consider
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Five Business Priorities for the Future of Work

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Five Business Priorities for the Future of Work

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COVID-19 is ushering in an entirely different future in terms of working life. However, forces such as digitalization have been altering the workforce long before the pandemic.

OECD research suggests that 31% of jobs could be radically transformed as a result of automation. At the same time, specialized jobs are being created elsewhere. These big picture trends mean that many organizations are already preparing for a now-accelerated future.

This infographic from PwC identifies five priorities that can help provide a path forward for a company’s Future of Work plan—strengthened by responses from an ongoing survey of U.S. CFOs on their workforce strategy.

1. Business Strategy

According to the survey, 72% of U.S. chief financial officers (CFOs) say they that responding to COVID-19 with better resilience and agility will be a key factor to their company’s improvement in the long run.

Factor% Respondents
Work flexibility73%
Better resilience and agility72%
Technology investments56%
New ways to serve customers53%
Leaner inspirations50%
Community and societal engagement27%

Flexible ways of working, such as telecommuting or shorter workweeks, also can help improve productivity and work-life balance, further spurring this shift. Companies should avoid ignoring the needs of employees and invest in creating a thriving work environment.

2. Talent Planning

Hiring to accomplish workforce goals alone is not enough. Companies should think about three steps when building a strong talent pool:

  • Recruit well
    Assess your company’s values and mission, and keep an eye on diversity and inclusion while hiring. For example, it’s been proven that gender diversity initiatives are good for the bottom line, improving outcomes and increasing profits and productivity.
    • Retain talent
      At present, 55% of CFOs don’t feel very confident in their company’s ability to retain critical talent.
      Organizations should avoid hiring with a short-term mindset. Instead, focus on building employees’ skills, with emphasis on upskilling in digital tools and software.
      • Stay adaptable
        Businesses are increasingly leveraging the gig economy, as alternative models grow in popularity.

      3. Learning & Innovation

      Despite incoming automation threats, six in ten adults still lack basic information and communications skills. The good news? In the future, both digital and human skills will be in high demand.

      To keep up with these trends, upskilling—ranging from digital literacy to critical thinking—will be of the essence. It requires both an individual and an organizational commitment to create a culture of learning in the workforce.

      Currently, only 45% of CFOs feel very confident in their company’s ability to build the necessary skills for the future.

      4. Employee Experience

      These days, employees rarely approach their work as only a “Nine to Five” job. Instead, they seek meaningful work, relationships, and experiences—PwC notes that one in three workers would be willing to consider lower pay for a more fulfilling job.

      To that effect, there is a renewed spotlight on supporting individual needs and well-being. There are tangible benefits to an engaged workforce:

      • 41% reduction in absenteeism
      • 24-59% less turnover
      • 20% increase in sales
      • 17% increase in productivity

      For future success, organizations should build a holistic view of the employee experience. To that end, 49% of CFOs do not feel confident in their company’s ability to manage employee well-being and morale.

      5. Work Environment

      Flexible work is an essential component of the future of business, and it seems that it’s here to stay. 72% of CFOs believe that work flexibility will make their company better in the long run.

      This drives home the urgent need to reconfigure the traditional office and bolster remote work capabilities—enabling employees to work from wherever they want, whenever they want.

      It’s clear the Future of Work discussion isn’t happening in a bubble—these alternative workforce needs are simply speeding up the inevitable transition.

      Many companies only focus on two or three of the above priorities, but aligning all five will be crucial for the future of work.

      Note: All statistics are from the same PwC U.S. CFO Pulse survey unless otherwise stated.
      PwC surveyed 330 US CFOs and finance leaders between June 8-11, 2020. 88% percent of the respondents were from public and private companies in these top five sectors: health industries (9%), consumer markets (13%), financial services (23%), industrial products (23%), and technology, media and telecommunications (20%). Twenty-nine percent of respondents were from Fortune 1000 companies. The PwC CFO Pulse Survey is conducted on a periodic basis to track changing sentiment and priorities. Now in its sixth installment, the inaugural survey was conducted March 9-11, 2020.

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Visualizing America’s Electric Vehicle Future

The U.S. is accelerating its transition to electric vehicles but obtaining the minerals and metals required for EVs remains a challenge. In this infographic, we explore America’s transportation future.

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Visualizing America’s Electric Vehicle Future

The U.S. is accelerating its transition to electric vehicles (EV) to address climate change. However, obtaining the minerals and metals required for EV batteries remains a challenge.

In this infographic from Talon Metals and Li-Cycle, we explore the country’s strategy to have vehicles, batteries, and key parts be made in the United States.

Then, we look at how this strategy could be fueled by domestic mining and battery recycling.

The All-Electric America

Gasoline-powered cars are one of the biggest sources of carbon pollution driving the climate crisis. As a result, the Biden Administration has set a target for EVs to make up 50% of all new car sales in the U.S. by 2030. Today, fewer than 1% of the country’s 250 million vehicles are electric.

In November 2021, Congress passed the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal, which includes:

  • Replacing the government’s 650,000 vehicle motor pool with EVs.
  • Electrifying 20% of the country’s 500,000 school buses.
  • Investing $7.5 billion to build out a network of 500,000 electric vehicle chargers across the country.

The idea also has popular support. According to a poll, 55% of voters in the U.S. support requiring all new cars sold in their state to be electric starting in 2030.

However, rising EV sales are already driving demand for battery metals such as nickel, lithium, and copper, threatening to trigger a shortage of these key raw materials. So, does the U.S. have the raw materials needed to meet this rising demand?

Currently, the U.S. is import-dependent with large parts of the battery supply chain captured by China. Likewise, some essential metals for EVs are currently extracted from countries that have poor labor standards and high CO2 footprints.

Nickel in the Land of Opportunity

The Biden Administration’s 100-day review of critical supply chains recommended the government should prioritize investing in nickel processing capability.

Today, the only operating nickel mine in the U.S., the Eagle Mine in Michigan, ships its concentrates abroad for refining and is scheduled to close in 2025.

To fill the supply gap, Talon Metals is developing the Tamarack Nickel Project in Minnesota, the only high-grade development-stage nickel mine in the country. Tesla has recently signed an agreement to purchase 75,000 metric tonnes of nickel in concentrate from Tamarack.

Since the development and construction of a mine can take many years, recycling is considered an essential source of raw material for EVs.

The Role of Battery Recycling

Battery recycling could meet up to 30% of nickel and 80% of cobalt usage in electric vehicles by the end of the decade.

The bipartisan $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill already sets aside $6 billion for developing battery materials processing capacity in the United States.

By 2030, the U.S. alone is projected to have more than 218,000 tonnes of EV battery manufacturing scrap and 313,000 tonnes of end-of-life EV batteries per year, presenting a massive opportunity for recycling. Currently, Li-Cycle, a leading lithium-ion battery recycler in North America, can process up to 10,000 tonnes of battery material per year—and this capacity is set to grow to up to 30,000 tonnes by the end of 2022.

Li-Cycle also has a hydrometallurgy refinement hub under construction in Rochester, New York, which will process up to the equivalent of 225,000 EV batteries annually into battery-grade lithium, nickel, and cobalt when it is operational in 2023.

America’s Electric Vehicle Future

The auto industry’s future “is electric, and there’s no turning back,” according to President Biden. It’s expected that EV sales in the U.S. will grow from around 500,000 vehicles in 2021 to over 4 million in 2030.

With rising government support and consumers embracing electric vehicles, securing the supply of the materials necessary for the EV revolution will remain a top priority for the country.

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Retirement Spending: How Much Do Americans Plan to Spend Annually?

Retirement expenses can vary significantly from person to person. In this graphic, we show the range of expected retirement spending.

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Retirement Spending

Americans’ Expected Annual Retirement Spending

Planning for retirement can be a daunting task. How much money will you need? What will your retirement spending look like?

It varies from person to person, based on factors like your health, outstanding expenses, and desired lifestyle. One helpful trick is to break it down into how much you estimate you’ll spend each year.

In this graphic from Personal Capital, we show the expected annual retirement spending of Americans. It’s the last in a three-part series that explores Americans’ spending and savings.

The Range of Retirement Spending

To determine how much people expect to spend, we used anonymized data from users of Personal Capital’s retirement planning tool. It’s worth noting that these users are proactive regarding financial planning. They also have a median net worth of $829,000 compared to the $122,000 median net worth of the U.S. population overall.

Here is the range of expected annual retirement spending.

Expected Annual Retirement SpendingPercent of People
$10K1.3%
$20K3.3%
$30K7.5%
$40K9.8%
$50K5.2%
$60K12.7%
$70K10.2%
$80K6.4%
$90K9.1%
$100K5.4%
$110K1.5%
$120K9.7%
$130K1.5%
$140K2.8%
$150K2.2%
$160K0.9%
$170K0.4%
$180K2.7%
$190K0.7%
$200K0.8%
$210K0.5%
$220K0.2%
$230K0.1%
$240K1.6%
$250K0.3%
$260K0.2%
$270K0.1%
$280K0.1%
$290K0.1%
$300K0.7%
Over $300K2.1%

Users are a mix of single individuals and people in a relationship. In all cases, expected retirement spending is what the household expects to spend annually.

The most commonly-cited expected spending amount is $60,000. Interestingly, this is roughly in line with what Americans spend annually on their credit cards. This suggests that people may be using their current bills to help gauge their future retirement spending.

Median spending, or the middle value when spending is ordered from lowest to highest, falls at $70,000. However, average spending is a fair amount higher at $100,000. This is because the average is calculated by adding up all the expected retirement spending amounts and dividing by the total number of users. Higher expected spending amounts, some in excess of $300,000 per year, skew the average calculation upwards.

Of course, given their higher net worth, it’s perhaps not surprising that many Personal Capital users expect to spend larger amounts in retirement. How does this compare to the general population? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Americans age 65 and older spend about $48,000 per year on average.

Chances of Retirement Success

Once you’ve determined how much you’ll spend in retirement, your next step may be to wonder if your savings are on track. Based on an assessment of Personal Capital retirement planner users, here is the breakdown of people’s chance of success.

Retirement Spending Chance of Success

The good news: more than half of people have an 80% or better chance of meeting their retirement spending goals. This means they have sufficient financial assets and are contributing enough, regularly enough, to meet their expected spending amount. The not so good news: one in five people has a less than 50% chance of meeting their goals.

This problem is even more troublesome in the overall U.S. population. Only 50% of people have a retirement account, and the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College estimates half of today’s workers are unprepared for retirement.

Setting Your Own Retirement Spending Goals

While seeing the goals of others is a starting point, your annual retirement spending will be very specific to you. Not sure where to start?

Financial planners typically recommend that you should plan on needing 70-80% of your pre-retirement income in retirement. This is because people generally no longer have certain expenses, such as commuting or childcare costs, when they retire. However, keep in mind your expenses could be higher if you still have a mortgage, encounter unforeseen medical expenses, or want to splurge on things like travel when you retire.

It requires some upfront planning, but being realistic about your retirement spending can give you confidence in your financial future.

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