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Five Business Priorities for the Future of Work

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Five Business Priorities for the Future of Work

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COVID-19 is ushering in an entirely different future in terms of working life. However, forces such as digitalization have been altering the workforce long before the pandemic.

OECD research suggests that 31% of jobs could be radically transformed as a result of automation. At the same time, specialized jobs are being created elsewhere. These big picture trends mean that many organizations are already preparing for a now-accelerated future.

This infographic from PwC identifies five priorities that can help provide a path forward for a company’s Future of Work plan—strengthened by responses from an ongoing survey of U.S. CFOs on their workforce strategy.

1. Business Strategy

According to the survey, 72% of U.S. chief financial officers (CFOs) say they that responding to COVID-19 with better resilience and agility will be a key factor to their company’s improvement in the long run.

Factor% Respondents
Work flexibility73%
Better resilience and agility72%
Technology investments56%
New ways to serve customers53%
Leaner inspirations50%
Community and societal engagement27%

Flexible ways of working, such as telecommuting or shorter workweeks, also can help improve productivity and work-life balance, further spurring this shift. Companies should avoid ignoring the needs of employees and invest in creating a thriving work environment.

2. Talent Planning

Hiring to accomplish workforce goals alone is not enough. Companies should think about three steps when building a strong talent pool:

  • Recruit well
    Assess your company’s values and mission, and keep an eye on diversity and inclusion while hiring. For example, it’s been proven that gender diversity initiatives are good for the bottom line, improving outcomes and increasing profits and productivity.
    • Retain talent
      At present, 55% of CFOs don’t feel very confident in their company’s ability to retain critical talent.
      Organizations should avoid hiring with a short-term mindset. Instead, focus on building employees’ skills, with emphasis on upskilling in digital tools and software.
      • Stay adaptable
        Businesses are increasingly leveraging the gig economy, as alternative models grow in popularity.

      3. Learning & Innovation

      Despite incoming automation threats, six in ten adults still lack basic information and communications skills. The good news? In the future, both digital and human skills will be in high demand.

      To keep up with these trends, upskilling—ranging from digital literacy to critical thinking—will be of the essence. It requires both an individual and an organizational commitment to create a culture of learning in the workforce.

      Currently, only 45% of CFOs feel very confident in their company’s ability to build the necessary skills for the future.

      4. Employee Experience

      These days, employees rarely approach their work as only a “Nine to Five” job. Instead, they seek meaningful work, relationships, and experiences—PwC notes that one in three workers would be willing to consider lower pay for a more fulfilling job.

      To that effect, there is a renewed spotlight on supporting individual needs and well-being. There are tangible benefits to an engaged workforce:

      • 41% reduction in absenteeism
      • 24-59% less turnover
      • 20% increase in sales
      • 17% increase in productivity

      For future success, organizations should build a holistic view of the employee experience. To that end, 49% of CFOs do not feel confident in their company’s ability to manage employee well-being and morale.

      5. Work Environment

      Flexible work is an essential component of the future of business, and it seems that it’s here to stay. 72% of CFOs believe that work flexibility will make their company better in the long run.

      This drives home the urgent need to reconfigure the traditional office and bolster remote work capabilities—enabling employees to work from wherever they want, whenever they want.

      It’s clear the Future of Work discussion isn’t happening in a bubble—these alternative workforce needs are simply speeding up the inevitable transition.

      Many companies only focus on two or three of the above priorities, but aligning all five will be crucial for the future of work.

      Note: All statistics are from the same PwC U.S. CFO Pulse survey unless otherwise stated.
      PwC surveyed 330 US CFOs and finance leaders between June 8-11, 2020. 88% percent of the respondents were from public and private companies in these top five sectors: health industries (9%), consumer markets (13%), financial services (23%), industrial products (23%), and technology, media and telecommunications (20%). Twenty-nine percent of respondents were from Fortune 1000 companies. The PwC CFO Pulse Survey is conducted on a periodic basis to track changing sentiment and priorities. Now in its sixth installment, the inaugural survey was conducted March 9-11, 2020.

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Decarbonization 101: What Carbon Emissions Are Part Of Your Footprint?

What types of carbon emissions do companies need to be aware of to effectively decarbonize? Here are the 3 scopes of carbon emissions.

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Scopes of Carbon Emissions Share

What Carbon Emissions Are Part Of Your Footprint?

With many countries and companies formalizing commitments to meeting the Paris Agreement carbon emissions reduction goals, the pressure to decarbonize is on.

A common commitment from organizations is a “net-zero” pledge to both reduce and balance carbon emissions with carbon offsets. Germany, France and the UK have already signed net-zero emissions laws targeting 2050, and the U.S. and Canada recently committed to synchronize efforts towards the same net-zero goal by 2050.

As organizations face mounting pressure from governments and consumers to decarbonize, they need to define the carbon emissions that make up their carbon footprints in order to measure and minimize them.

This infographic from the National Public Utility Council highlights the three scopes of carbon emissions that make up a company’s carbon footprint.

The 3 Scopes of Carbon Emissions To Know

The most commonly used breakdown of a company’s carbon emissions are the three scopes defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol, a partnership between the World Resources Institute and Business Council for Sustainable Development.

The GHG Protocol separates carbon emissions into three buckets: emissions caused directly by the company, emissions caused by the company’s consumption of electricity, and emissions caused by activities in a company’s value chain.

Scope 1: Direct emissions

These emissions are direct GHG emissions that occur from sources owned or controlled by the company, and are generally the easiest to track and change. Scope 1 emissions include:

  • Factories
  • Facilities
  • Boilers
  • Furnaces
  • Company vehicles
  • Chemical production (not including biomass combustion)

Scope 2: Indirect electricity emissions

These emissions are indirect GHG emissions from the generation of purchased electricity consumed by the company, which requires tracking both your company’s energy consumption and the relevant electrical output type and emissions from the supplying utility. Scope 2 emissions include:

  • Electricity use (e.g. lights, computers, machinery, heating, steam, cooling)
  • Emissions occur at the facility where electricity is generated (fossil fuel combustion, etc.)

Scope 3: Value chain emissions

These emissions include all other indirect GHG emissions occurring as a consequence of a company’s activities both upstream and downstream. They aren’t controlled or owned by the company, and many reporting bodies consider them optional to track, but they are often the largest source of a company’s carbon footprint and can be impacted in many different ways. Scope 3 emissions include:

  • Purchased goods and services
  • Transportation and distribution
  • Investments
  • Employee commute
  • Business travel
  • Use and waste of products
  • Company waste disposal

The Carbon Emissions Not Measured

Most uses of the GHG Protocol by companies includes many of the most common and impactful greenhouse gases that were covered by the UN’s 1997 Kyoto Protocol. These include carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, as well as other gases and carbon-based compounds.

But the standard doesn’t include other emissions that either act as minor greenhouse gases or are harmful to other aspects of life, such as general pollutants or ozone depletion.

These are emissions that companies aren’t required to track in the pressure to decarbonize, but are still impactful and helpful to reduce:

  • Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCS): These are greenhouse gases used mainly in refrigeration systems and in fire suppression systems (alongside halons) that are regulated by the Montreal Protocol due to their contribution to ozone depletion.
  • Nitrogen oxides (NOx): These gases include nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and are caused by the combustion of fuels and act as a source of air pollution, contributing to the formation of smog and acid rain.
  • Halocarbons: These carbon-halogen compounds have been used historically as solvents, pesticides, refrigerants, adhesives, and plastics, and have been deemed a direct cause of global warming for their role in the depletion of the stratospheric ozone.

There are many different types of carbon emissions for companies (and governments) to consider, measure, and reduce on the path to decarbonization. But that means there are also many places to start.

National Public Utilities Council is the go-to resource for all things decarbonization in the utilities industry. Learn more.

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The Paris Agreement: Is The World’s Climate Action Plan on Track?

This graphic shows how close we are to achieving the Paris Agreement’s climate action plan, and what happens if we fail to reach its goal.

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Climate Action Plan

Keeping Tabs on the World’s Climate Action Plan

When the Paris Agreement came into force in 2016, it was considered by many to be a step forward in the world’s climate action plan. In the five years that have followed, more and more countries have established carbon neutrality targets.

Has it been enough to keep us on track? This graphic from MSCI shows where we are in relation to the Paris Agreement goal, and what may happen if we fail to reach it.

What is the Paris Agreement?

The Paris Agreement is a legally binding international treaty that lays out a climate action plan. Its goal is to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), and preferably to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit), compared to pre-industrial levels.

A total of 191 countries have solidified their support with formal approval.

Tracking Our Progress

To date, signing nations are not close to hitting the goal set five years ago.

ScenarioGlobal Mean Temperature Increase by 2100
Pre-industrial baseline0℃ (0℉)
Paris Agreement goal range1.5-2.0℃ (2.7-3.6℉)
Government pledges3.0-3.2℃ (5.4-5.8℉)
Current policies3.5℃ (6.3℉)

Source: UN Environment Programme

Based on policies currently in effect, we are on track for 3.5 degrees Celsius global warming by 2100—far beyond the maximum warming goal of 2 degrees. Even if we take government pledges into account, which is the amount by which countries intend to reduce their emissions, we are still far from achieving the Paris Agreement goal.

What about the impact of reduced emissions due to COVID-19 lockdowns? The temporary dip is expected to translate into an insignificant 0.01 degree Celsius reduction of global warming by 2050. Without significant policy action that pursues a more sustainable recovery, the UN Environment Programme projects that we will continue on a dangerous trajectory.

“The pandemic is a warning that we must urgently shift from our destructive development path, which is driving the three planetary crises of climate change, nature loss and pollution.”
—Inger Andersen, Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme

The World Economic Forum agrees with this viewpoint, and identified climate action failure as one of the most likely and impactful risks of 2021.

The Potential Consequences

If we fall short of the climate action plan, our planet may see numerous negative effects.

  • Reduced livable land area: Due to rising sea levels and increased heat stress, low-lying areas and equatorial regions could become uninhabitable.
  • Scarce food and water: Global warming may increase water and food scarcity. In particular, fisheries and aquafarming face increasing risks from ocean warming and acidification.
  • Loss of life: The World Health Organization projects that climate change will cause 250,000 additional deaths per year between 2030 and 2050.
  • Less biodiversity: About 30% of plant and animal species could be extinct by 2070, primarily due to increases in maximum annual temperature.
  • Economic losses: At 4 degree celsius warming by 2080-2099, the U.S. could suffer annual losses amounting to 2% of GDP (about $400B). If global warming is limited to 2 degrees, losses would likely drop to 0.5% of GDP.

What steps can we take to reduce these risks?

Advancing Our Climate Action Plan

Everyone, including investors, can support green initiatives to help avoid these consequences. For example, investors may consider company ESG ratings when building a portfolio, and invest in businesses that are contributing to a more sustainable future.

In Part 2 of our Paris Agreement series, we’ll explain how investors can align their portfolio with the Paris Agreement goals.

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